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Posts Tagged ‘Barbra Streisand’

Barbra Streisand Asks Australian Reporter: ‘Are There Kangaroos Popping Around There?’

“I love the way you talk… It’s such a great accent.” That’s how Barbra Streisand begins a 1964 interview in her Funny Girl dressing room at the Windsor Garden Theatre on Broadway with the late Australian radio reporter Binny Lum, who passed away last year at age 97.

Thanks to Australia’s National Film & Sound Archive, that conversation and many other Lum celeb chats can now be accessed over the Internet. The institute has lovingly archived the work of Lum, who hosted an afternoon show on Melbourne’s 3XY. Per the institute, here’s how Lum in her memoirs framed the Streisand conversation:

I guess Barbra looked fairly basic, in slacks and a sloppy joe top, but her personality was a different thing. She had a disarming, down-to-earth naturalness which the Americans might call “kooky”…

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EXCLUSIVE: Dick Clark ‘Lost’ Interview – Part 2

[Editor's Note: The following, never-before-published interview (Part 1 here) was conducted via telephone on December 23, 1993 by the late Jim Mitteager. The tape, part of a much larger collection bequeathed to Hollywood private eye Paul Barresi, was only recently discovered and graciously provided to FishbowlLA. Our thanks to Barresi for allowing us to share this great bit of nostalgia with our readers, on the anniversary of Clark's April 18, 2012 death.]

Mitteager: Has MTV impacted in a negative way on talent? There’s a lot of packaging that’s going on now that involves skills other than the ability to sing and write good songs. Is it impacting on new talent as opposed to the old days?

Clark: I wouldn’t blame it all on MTV. I’d blame it on the consolidation of the music business, between five or six nationally owned companies. You’ve got all of these big debts that they’ve got to pay. They’ve got them on a timetable, and that includes videos and personal appearances and promotions and all of that. So some new guy, it makes it very difficult to get launched. That’s the whole thing about what’s wrong with the business these days. It’s tough to break through.

Mitteager:  What would be your best advice to an aspiring artist out there that is in that pickle right now, that have no representation and has some talent?

Clark: I would try to get to one of the cities where people find talent, LA, New York, Nashville, Seattle… Get out there and showcase yourself.

Mitteager: I want to rack your brain about people that got there start on Bandstand, or with you in general and have now become award winners on the American Music Awards.

Clark: New Edition, they debuted on Bandstand.

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Upcoming Documentary Will Offer a Big Hooray for Canadians in Hollywood

Once again this holiday season, they’re everywhere on the American pop culture firmament. Martin Short hosted SNL’s Christmas show; Seth Rogen is road-tripping on the big screen with Barbra Streisand; and Cirque du Soleil is winding down Iris at the Dolby Theatre.

To celebrate the contributions of these and many other south-of-the-border entertainment industry Canucks, the British Columbia duo of Ian Ferguson and Leslie Bland are preparing the 2013 book and documentary double whammy Gone South: How Canada Invented Hollywood. As they recently explained to a reporter for their Victoria hometown newspaper the Times-Colonist, the goal with the doc is to have fun:

In lieu of typical talking-heads footage, they plan to shoot conversations with stars engaged in activities, such as potential sequences in which Lost star Evangeline Lilly would point out Canadian stars on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. If he’s available, Short might speak while shooting pool, or Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek could chat while slapping pucks around.

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Brooklyn Youth Chorus with Barbra Streisand at Barclays

The Barclays Center opened last week with a series of concerts by Jay-Z. He is part owner of the Brooklyn Nets, who will play at the Barclays starting this month. But for many, the arena is gets its official “welcoming committee” next week when Brooklyn’s own Barbra Streisand takes the stage for two shows. It marks the legendary performer’s first show on her home turf since her days in the Erasmus High School chorus. Streisand, 70, graduated from Erasmus in 1959.

The October 11 and October 13 concerts will flashback to the old days. Not only will the audience see a rare Streisand live performance, and even rarer, one in Brooklyn, the famed Brooklyn Youth Chorus will join Streisand on stage for a pair of encores.

The teens will accompany Streisand on the West Side Story classic Somewhere and Make Your Garden Grow from Candide, the Daily News reports.

Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz was quoted in the newspaper saying, “It’s fabulous, just fabulous.”

Photo credit: showbiz411.com

New York Native, Composing Great Marvin Hamlisch Succumbs to Short Illness

He was one of this country’s most decorated composer. Marvin Hamlisch died suddenly yesterday after a brief illness. No other details are available. Hamlisch was 68.

Hamlisch is one of only a handful of people to win the “Big Four” awards–an Oscar, Grammy, Emmy, and Tony. The air gets even more rarefied when a Pulitzer Prize is included (Richard Rodgers is the other).

Hamlisch, according to wikipedia, grew up in New York City to Viennese Jewish parents. By five, the child prodigy began emulating the piano he heard on the radio.

In 1951, he was accepted by the Julliard School Pre-College Division. He was seven at the time.

His first job was as the rehearsal pianist at Funny Girl starring Barbra Streisand, which came to Broadway in 1964. The two would become life-long friends.

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Playwright/Screenwriter Arthur Laurents Dies at 93

Tony Award-winning playwright Arthur Laurents died yesterday of complications from a bout of pneumonia. He was 93.

Laurents was perhaps best known for his work on the stage, most famously penning the book for West Side Story. But he had an extensive film and television career as well. He produced and wrote the screenplay for the Robert Redford/Barbra Streisand love story The Way We Were as well as the Shirley MacLaine/Anne Bancroft film Turning Point. Both film were nominated for multiple Oscars, although neither won. Laurents’ other screenwriting credits include Alfred Hitchcock‘s Rope, and Anastasia, starring Ingrid Bergman.

RIP.

Up for Bid: Marlon Brando’s Personal Phone Book

According to the old adage, Hollywood’s greatest actors are ones who can triumph even if the script is a phone book. In Marlon Brando‘s case, Julien’s Auctions in Beverly Hills has the next best thing this weekend – the late actor’s actual personal phone book.

The starting bid for this item is $500, and while many of the numbers may no longer be in service, it’s still a great dinner party conversation starter:

A burgundy leather three-ring binder telephone book circa 2003 containing hundreds of Brando’s personal friends and business contacts worldwide. Some names include Michael Jackson, Johnny Depp, Alec Baldwin, Johnnie Cochran, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert De Niro, Jane Goodall, Faye Dunaway, Jane Fonda, Madonna, Jack Nicholson, Robert Redford, John Travolta, Barbra Streisand as well as noted scientists in various fields of study, press contacts and the United Nations and many other noteable entries.

If that’s not good enough, you can also bid this weekend on a Golden Globe the actor refused to accept for his portrayal of Don Corleone in The Godfather.

Clive Davis Would Like to Hear a Little Less Dance Music

There are some bonafide music industry legends lined up for Sunday’s Grammy show – Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan, Barbra Streisand. But towering above them all, per usual, will be current Sony Music maestro Clive Davis, whose Saturday night party at the Beverly Hilton is a bigger deal for the artists than the show itself.

Earlier this week, the New York Times did a brief Q&A with the 78-year-old Davis on the occasion of the Grammy Museum in downtown LA christening a 200-seat auditorium in his name. Along with explaining how hard it has become to say no to some of those who want to attend his party (“This year I really can’t go out to public restaurants”), Davis had some interesting thoughts on the state of the music industry. He says while the singles industry has come back with a vengeance, the radio end of things is in bad shape:

What I do find challenging is that radio is more restrictive these days, in changing Top 40 to rhythm, almost totally and exclusively. It’s fine to have dance music, it’s fine to have rhythmic music. But we must have our troubadours. We must have our poet laureates. We must have our new Dylan’s and new Springsteen’s.

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Lunch: Glenn Close Talks Fatal Attraction

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— DIANE CLEHANE

I love when the stars align just right on a Wednesday at Michael’s, and I get to chat with a star I’ve always admired. I hit the jackpot today when I spotted Glenn Close in the dining room. Just last week, I’d seen Glenn on Oprah Winfrey‘s Oscar special where she and Michael Douglas did their first joint television interview about Fatal Attraction. “It was great fun,” Glenn, who looked positively radiant, told me. “We’d never done that before and it brought it all back for us.”

I don’t think anyone who saw the iconic thriller (nominated for six Academy Awards, including a best actress nod for Glenn) could ever forget her portrayal of book editor Alex Forrest. While audiences pegged Glenn’s character as a home wrecker and bunny boiler, the actress, after doing tons of research for the part, saw her much differently. “I never thought of her as a villain,” she says. Instead, she viewed the character as an unstable woman driven to madness over an affair gone wrong. Audiences made it the second highest grossing film of 1987, and it became a cautionary tale for men everywhere who thought twice, at least for five minutes, about having that one night stand. “We had no idea we were going to be part of a social phenomenon,” says Glenn, who happened to be lunching with Stanley Jaffe, the film’s producer. “But it was right at the time when there was a lot of feminist anger, and we touched something that was right below the surface.” I’ll say.

I was joined today by Myrna Blyth, who after spending two decades as editor-in-chief of Ladies Home Journal and later launched MORE, is now at the helm of BettyConfidential.com. (Full disclosure: I write a parenting blog for the site). Since launching two years ago, the site, which was co-founded by Deborah Perry Piscione and Shaun Marsh, now ranks seventh in comScore’s top ten in the Beauty/Fashion/Style category and was recently nominated by MIN for editorial excellence for their Best of the Web Awards — competing with Conde Nast and The Daily Beast. “What’s great about being online is that you can talk to women about what they want to talk about when they want to talk about it,” says Myrna. While so many in print are bemoaning the decline of magazines, Myrna doesn’t have time for all the whining: “The web is great. You can’t go backwards and you can’t fight it, so you’ve got to get with it.”

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. Today show co-hosts Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb with Sunny Luciani. The gals ducked out early for their weekly Broadway outing.

2. Michael Fuchs and a blonde mystery gal

3. ‘Mayor’ Joe Armstrong and Paula Zahn

4. Jonathan Wald and The Financial TimesChrystia Freeland. I told Jonathan that his Facebook posts on Sunday had reassured me that Cablevision and WABC-TV would, in fact, come to their senses and restore service so that their 3.1 million viewers could watch the Oscars. “It will be settled in time,” he predicted when things didn’t look good later that afternoon, and lo and behold, the show appeared 13 minutes into the telecast. Whew!

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PR Legend Lee Solters Dead at 90

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Nikki Finke reports and we confirmed that Lee Solters passed away early this morning at the age of 90.

Solters was the pub for people such as Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, Michael Jackson and many others.

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