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Posts Tagged ‘Bill Gates’

Bill Gates is (Once Again) Forbes’ Richest Person in America

unnamedForbes has released its annual Richest Americans list, and for the 21st straight time, Bill Gates claims the number one spot with a net worth of $81 billion. Gates is followed by a bunch of other obscenely wealthy old white dudes (Warren Buffett, $67 billion; Larry Ellison, $50 billion; David and Charles Koch, $42 billion each).

There are some women on the Forbes 400 list — 47, to be exact. That’s down from 48 last year. The youngest woman on the list is Elizabeth Holmes (#110), founder of the medical technology company Theranos. The youngest male is Mark Zuckerberg (#11).

If you’re in the mood to applaud the .03 percent, check out the entire list.

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Michael Bloomberg is Worth $27 Billion

According to Forbes’ latest billionaire list, Michael Bloomberg — mayor, media maven, soda hater — is worth $27 billion. That’s an increase from 2012, when he was worth a pathetic $22 billion.

Despite all that money, Bloomberg only ranks as the 13th wealthiest person in the world. The number one spot is held down by Carlos Slim and family, with $73 billion. He is followed by Bill Gates ($67 billion), Amancio Ortega ($57), and Warren Buffett ($53.5).

For the full list of people with way more money than all of us combined, click through. Ladies, we suggest you don’t even bother. Out of the 1,426 total people on the list, only 138 of them are women.

Forbes Lists 400 Richest (White) People in America

The economy is still in the crapper, so why don’t we celebrate that by looking at Forbes’ list of the 400 richest people in the nation? As usual, pretty much everyone on the list is white. If that surprises you, please read the following very carefully: White people own everything. It’s not fair, but it’s true.

Bill Gates leads the pack this year with a total net worth of $66 billion, followed by Warren Buffett ($46 billion) and Larry Ellison ($41 billion).

As for New York media moguls, our Mayor, Michael Bloombergcomes in at a respectable 10th, with $25 billion. Rupert Murdoch is tied for 36th with Mark Zuckerberg, at $9.4 billion. We’re pretty sure that makes them best friends, but we’re still waiting on confirmation of that.

A few others: Samuel Newhouse comes in at 46 with $7.4 billion; Donald Newhouse ranks 51st, with $6.6 billion; and Mort Zuckerman ranks 190th, with $2.4 billion.

For the full list, click through.

Corbis Acquires Leading Product Placement Agency

It can be tough sometimes for reporters to liven up a dry bit of business news such as the acquisition of LA’s Norm Marshall & Associates by the Bill Gates-owned Corbis. But tipped ahead of Monday’s press release, New York Times writer Stuart Elliott managed to add some good color.

That’s because Marshall is a seasoned, fun interview. In addition to telling Elliott that his movie and TV product placement agency has previously turned down more than a half-dozen acquisition offers, he had this response when the reporter inquired about the Microsoft-minted price tag:

Mr. Marshall and [Corbis exec] Mr. Shenk said they could not discuss the financial terms of the deal. “Bill has a thing about not divulging financial stuff,” Mr. Marshall said, referring to Mr. Gates, adding that Mr. Shenk had told him, “‘Norm, if I do it, Bill will fire me.’”

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Tom Brokaw, Vernon Jordan and the Shy Divorcee

1003_mockup.gifIt was SRO at Michael’s today. The dining room was so jam packed every sqaure inch was occupied by a mogul (Mel Karmazin!), media heavyweight (Tom Brokaw, Jon Meacham, Jeff Zucker), or social swan (divorcee of the moment, Mercedes Bass who moved to the Garden Room with pal Lynn Nesbitt when the decibel level and fabulousness of it all got to be too much).  Just a thought: if you’re looking for a quiet, out of the way lunch spot, you might want to consider going somewhere else on Wednesday.

I was joined today by Forbes‘ new editor, Randall Lane. In his new position, Randall is presiding over familiar territory to him: the lives of the ridiculously rich and ambitious. In a previous life, he was the editor of Trader Monthly which chronicled the age of excess of the Wall Streeter of days gone by.  That experience later provided plenty of fodder for his book, The Zeroes: My Misadventures in the Decade When Wall Street Went Insane. In the interim, he’s been an editor at large for Newsweek and written for The Daily Beast. Having worked with him years ago when he was the editor in chief on the startup Justice, which covered the hot trials and legal issues of the day, I was thrilled when I heard he’d gotten the top job at Forbes back in September.

Randall first worked at Forbes fresh out of college in the nineties and spent six years “chasing rich people” and working on the franchise’s venerated power lists which required (and still do) hundreds of hours of research and manpower. “In some ways, it feels like I never left,” he tells me.

Diane Clehane and Randall Lane
Randall Lane and yours truly

Since taking the helm, Randall has been on a mission to make the book more visually exciting with interesting photography (the arresting cover image of Bill Gates in the “World’s 70 Most Powerful People” issue is a winner), fresh design elements courtesy of the Brooklyn-based shop Athletics, a livelier front of book section and more in-depth profiles on people the Forbes reader wants to know about.  Exhibit A: The cover story in the November 7 issue on Dropbox’s Drew Houston, the 28 year-old mogul who turned down Steve Jobs and is now worth $600 million which drew one million hits on Forbes.com.

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A Photojournalist’s Tale of Woe

It’s not just print journalists taking it on the chin these days. Per a long and highly informative article at ConsortiumNews.com by Don North, the acquisition of agencies Bettman Archives and Sygma by Bill Gates has done little to bring order to the domain of photo rights compensation.

In fact, fueled by the Internet’s power to at once disperse and devalue image assets, today’s consolidated photo news industry has become a virtual war zone. North zeroes in on an awful chapter involving photographer Dominique Aubert (pictured):

In 2000, during a trip to Los Angeles, Aubert discovered that some of his photos were being used in magazines for commercial advertising, which he had not authorized and had not been paid for.

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Former Herald-Examiner Staffer Remembers Her ‘Hacking’ Days

Barbara Sehr, who once worked for the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner and now does both stand-up in Seattle and the occasional blog entry for Seattle PI, has a fun piece framed within the context of the sordid NOTW scandal.

As a cub reporter for the long gone LA daily, Sehr writes that she was working in the halo of 1976 Oscar winning film All The President’s Men. In those days, there were no concerns about protecting voice mail PIN codes:

The only hacking going on back then was the occasional techno-wizard who could figure out how to make a free call from a pay phone (anyone remember pay phones?) or better yet, make a free long distance call…

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Bill Gates Buys Into LA’s Splash News

As Seattle Times business reporter Melissa Allison so aptly puts it today in her article lede about Corbis Images’ acquisition of 21-year-old LA outfit Splash News, Bill Gates now owns a piece of Angelina Jolie. Or at least a piece of her luscious lipped photographic image.

The two biggest consumer photo licensing companies, Corbis and Getty Images, are both now headquartered in Seattle. To a certain extent, the decision by Corbis to purchase Splash for an undisclosed amount is just one more example of the “TMZ-ization” of the media. Per today’s press release:

””We are thrilled to join Corbis and will continue to do what we do best–deliver the authentic, breaking content that connects the media with its audience,” said Splash CEO Gary Morgan. “We look forward to providing our global network of photographers the ability to expand beyond their current reach through Corbis’ global footprint.”

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LA Startup Not Waiting for Superman

There’s a very informative interview today over at SoCalTech.com with CauseCast.com head honcho Ryan Scott. The Culver City firm, nurtured in 2008 by Arianna Huffington (who remains on the Advisory Board), is mainly about helping non-profits master the web and create online pathways at pinnacle media-attention moments.

FishbowlLA had no idea that CauseCast’s co-branded blogger ranks had passed the 1,000-person threshold. Thanks to contributors like George Lucas and Bill Gates, the site gets over a million uniques per month. Scott shares a great example of how the company was able to help extend the underlying mission statement of Davis Guggenheim‘s most recent documentary:

We launched an education section–partially in response to the Changing The Equation effort by the White House, but also because of the Waiting for Superman movie, which catalyzed a lot of the current talk about reforming education. We launched that section with Paramount, with the movie ad as the lead sponsor. It’s doing very well.

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Berkeley Journalism Grad Up for Student Academy Award

If Clare Major wins a 2011 Student Academy Award for Best Documentary, she will have the opportunity to thank two most impressive patrons – Bill Gates and his wife Melinda. Feast & Sacrifice, her 26-minute look at the day-to-day life of a family in Senegal, Africa, was funded in part by a grant from the couple’s foundation.

Major served with the Peace Corp in Senegal from 2004 to 2006, later turning those experiences into her graduate thesis film at Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, where she completed her studies in 2010. Per the film’s official website:

Living for two years with the Bah family in Saare Muudu, I was intrigued by how the village existed at the intersection of First and Third Worlds. This film is an attempt to convey some of the stories of individuals – men working abroad, women left at home, and children confronting the divergent paths before them.

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