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Posts Tagged ‘Blake Edwards’

How William Friedkin Gunned His Way to The Exorcist

One of the most enjoyable anecdotal aspects of William Friedkin’s new autobiography The Friedkin Connection involves the late Blake Edwards. In 1966, when Friedkin was just getting started as a director on the TV side, he had the privilege of being asked to read the script for a planned feature film version of Edwards’ earlier TV series Peter Gunn. But it’s what happened at a subsequent Monday morning breakfast meeting that really made the difference:

“So what do you think?” Edwards asked.
I chose my words carefully, but I had to say what I felt and accept the consequences. “Blake, I think the script is a piece of sh*t.”
He looked up in shock, his English muffin poised in midair. “What?” He set his muffin down and looked at me directly, not so much mad as confused. “What did you just say?” A bitter smile crossed his lips.

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LA Author Still Dissecting Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Because the subject matter is Audrey Hepburn, there really is no end to the shelf life of a 2010 book about one of the actress’ most beloved movies, 1961′s Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Author Sam Wasson visits Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts tonight for a chat and screening of the movie, in connection with his tome Fifth Avenue, 5 a.m.

Wasson has also written a book about Tiffany’s director Blake Edwards called, memorably, Splurch in the Kisser. But in advance of tonight’s Texas apperance, it is film critic Joe Leydon who shares the Audrey Hepburn anecdote of the week. It happened in Florida in the early 90s, where Leydon, while chatting at a film festival soiree with a Newsweek reporter, suddenly noticed the movie goddess searching for a light.

I immediately take my leave of the Newsweek scribe, rush over to a nearby bar and implore the bartender for a book of matches. I toss him a tip and I race over to the Hollywood icon who’s jonesing for a nicotine rush.

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The Uneven Brilliance of Blake Edwards

Here’s an odd premise that Blake Edwards, who passed away in Santa Monica Wednesday at the age of 88, would have appreciated. The best first-wave remembrance comes not from Hollywood but rather Hollywood North.

Edwards would also have chuckled at the title of Macleans Magazine writer Jaime Weinman‘s piece, because it’s so true: “Blake Edwards: The Genius Without Quality Control.” No danger of an overly reverential obit here. While Weinman applauds Edwards’ Billy Wilder-like talents and flair for the visual, he also ponders one of the writer-director’s most prominent flaws:

The trouble is, along with the good scenes in bad movies, you get the bad scenes in good movies. And there are lots of them. I’m not a big fan of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, but it’s sort of emblematic: one of the most popular and beloved movies of his career, and every so often it’s interrupted by Mickey Rooney as a Japanese guy. Who thought this was a good idea?

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