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Posts Tagged ‘blogging’

Jozen Cummings on How He Became the NY Post‘s Dating Reporter

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It’s safe to say Jozen Cummings never imagined he’d become a professional matchmaker of sorts. The former arts and entertainment writer is now a dating reporter for The New York Post‘s Meet Market column, where he sets up singles on blind dates in New York City.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Cummings discusses what it’s like setting up blind dates for strangers, the accidental success of his blog and how he scored his dream job:

Your background is in arts and entertainment, so how did you end up a dating reporter?
It was the first job that I ever got where I went in not knowing anyone. But when I saw the opening for Meet Market, I said “This is the job for me. This is the job I want.” I know that people know about my blog, but I never use it as a way to sell myself or my qualifications. I still feel strongly about this: you want a professional job, you’ve got to show the most professional work that you possibly can. So none of my clips were dating-related or anything like that. But I knew that it would help to show that I care a lot about this topic of dating, so I did send a link to my blog. Kind of like a bowtie.

To hear more about his writing process and how he cultivated an audience for his blog, read: So What Do You Do, Jozen Cummings, Blogger And Dating Columnist For The New York Post?

– Aneya Fernando

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How to Monetize Your Blog

Everyone has a blog nowadays, but not everyone manages to make money from it. If you’ve managed to strike upon a large readership for your blog, thanks to breaking news or a great idea, your road to monetizing is far from over. Just because the masses come to you for info or entertainment does not mean advertisers will do the same, or that a book deal is in the bag. In the latest Mediabistro feature, Blair Koenig shares her experience from building a successful blog STFU, Parents, which gets 1.5 to 2 million page views a month:

When you’re building your own personal blog, it’s up to you to figure out how to make money — whether it’s from ad networks, independent advertisers, book deals, stores or through other media outlets. Koenig jokes, “I know there’s a lot out there that makes it sound like if you’re a popular blogger someone’s going to just ring your doorbell and be like, ‘Hey, I want to make a movie [based on your blog]!’ But it’s really, really hard and usually a lot of that stuff is created from the blogger [rather] than the other way around.”

Koenig uses three different ad networks and a couple of independent advertisers to earn money on her blog. She landed a book deal after completing the grueling process of writing a 60-page book proposal. She has plans to build a store within her website featuring STFU, Parents-themed merchandise as well. But money doesn’t suddenly start flowing in when your blog becomes popular, according to Koenig. She’s appeared on Good Morning America and various news outlets to talk about her blog, and although these appearances spike traffic to her site, she’s not getting paid outright for any publicity.

For more tips and advice on blogging, read What You Need to Know About Writing for Blogs.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

On The Menu: Melissa Lafsky Talks About Covering Infrastructure, Horror Films And 2012

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Blogger Melissa Lafsky, the latest editor of the blog The Infrastructurist, joined the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast today, where she chatted with hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven about the site that she described as an “ongoing conversation about how we get around and how we’ll get around in the future.”

“The joke with infrastructure is that no one pays much attention to it until it breaks down,” she said. “And right now we’re looking at a pretty existential break down [in] that we rely on certain fuels in order to get us to work in the morning and to get us around period, and these fuels are limited in capacity and will eventually run out. So the larger conversation is what’s the future of energy that’s going to run this country as well as the rest of the developed world.”

After talking about infrastructure in the U.S. and around the world, particularly in China and India, Melissa talked about another one of her gigs, as the “Horror Chick”, writing about horror movies for The Awl. Then, Jason asked her for a reaction to Roland Emmerich‘s latest disaster film, 2012, from a horror and infrastructure point of view. Melissa said she boycotted the film because she hates “apocalypse porn” but she still had something to say about it.

“The point of film is to take you to somewhat dark places,” she said. “A movie like this is raw, unbridled apocalypse porn. The premise is so ridiculous I don’t even have to tell you…But the point of this movie is just, ‘We’re going to take Independence Day and make it look like Little Miss Sunshine.’ That is probably the conversation that they had in the greenlight producer’s office.”

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Where’s The Best Place For Freelancers To Work In NYC?

coffee shop.jpgYesterday, a story we came across in The Wall Street Journal got us thinking: where do New York’s laptop-toting freelancers and bloggers like to work when they step out of their home offices?

Coffee shops, cafes, delis, libraries, book shops and even bars offer wireless Internet access, but it seems that more and more are making those of us looking for a place to work feel unwelcome. Wouldn’t it make your life easier if there was a list of the best places to work in the city?

Well, we’re on the case. Send us an email or leave a note in the comments letting us know your favorite laptop-friendly haunts. We’ll gather all your tips, take a trip there ourselves and compile the results for you. We’ll rank places based on quality and reliability of the Internet connection, friendliness of the staff, selection of coffee and snacks, access to electrical outlets, difficulty finding a place to sit, and any other factors we decide are important (if we missed anything, let us know).

We can’t wait to hear from you and start investigating the best places to work in the city.

Related: New York Coffee Shops Hate On Laptops

Advice On Blogging For A Living From A Rogue Blogger Chick

Last week, after mediabistro.com’s panel about business models for online media, we caught up with “rogue blogger chick” Maegan Carberry and asked her to tell us just how she does what she does. Her advice on how to make a living as a blogger is above. It may look like Maegan is telling a ghost story — the lighting was pretty awful — but what’s she’s saying is informative, not scary!

“What’s most important for you to understand is what role your blog plays in the written universe,” Maegan said. “If you don’t have a clear perspective about what you offer, you’re not going to succeed.”

More insight from Maegan and what earns her the most money out of all her projects, after the jump.

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What’s Next For Digital Publishing

mbcircus1.jpgThis morning, PCMag.com executive editor Dan Costa hosted a panel at Mediabistro Circus where he discussed the future of digital journalism with Anil Dash from Six Apart, Blurb founder Eileen Gittins and Rob Samuels, the director of mobile product development for the The New York Times.

Costa opened the discussion with a story about a freelance writer who pitched him recently. The writer said his rate was 15 cents per word. Is this this future of journalism?

Both Dash and Gittins agreed that measuring the rate a writer is paid based on number of words is outdated. Today, it’s all about being entrepreneurial, creating a brand and building a following. “If you can go to Dan and show that you have 10,000 avid followers, your rate per word will go up,” Gittins said.

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