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Posts Tagged ‘Bob Dylan’

A Bob Dylan Set List Sanctioned by China

There was no cry of “Hello Beijing!” from 69-year-old Bob Dylan when he performed Wednesday night at the Worker’s Gymnasium in Beijing (pictured). Also missing, per an entertaining dispatch from LA Times special correspondent Benjamin Haas, were several of the troubadour’s best known songs:

Conspicuously absent from the program were “The Times They Are A-Changin’” and “Blowin’ in the Wind.” Dylan’s set list had to be sanctioned beforehand by the Ministry of Culture, which in its formal invitation decreed that he would have to “conduct the performance strictly according to the approved program.”

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Clive Davis Would Like to Hear a Little Less Dance Music

There are some bonafide music industry legends lined up for Sunday’s Grammy show – Mick Jagger, Bob Dylan, Barbra Streisand. But towering above them all, per usual, will be current Sony Music maestro Clive Davis, whose Saturday night party at the Beverly Hilton is a bigger deal for the artists than the show itself.

Earlier this week, the New York Times did a brief Q&A with the 78-year-old Davis on the occasion of the Grammy Museum in downtown LA christening a 200-seat auditorium in his name. Along with explaining how hard it has become to say no to some of those who want to attend his party (“This year I really can’t go out to public restaurants”), Davis had some interesting thoughts on the state of the music industry. He says while the singles industry has come back with a vengeance, the radio end of things is in bad shape:

What I do find challenging is that radio is more restrictive these days, in changing Top 40 to rhythm, almost totally and exclusively. It’s fine to have dance music, it’s fine to have rhythmic music. But we must have our troubadours. We must have our poet laureates. We must have our new Dylan’s and new Springsteen’s.

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Google Offers Illustrators Opportunity To Work For Free

1goochro.jpgGoogle recently annoyed dozens of illustrators when it approached them about contributing art to the new Google Chrome browser. The artists would receive exposure as compensation for their work- and nothing else. From the NY Times:

In the first quarter of this year alone, Google reported profits of $1.42 billion, an increase of 8 percent over the same period last year.

In a statement responding to questions, Google said that the project was modeled after a similar one last year for iGoogle, a personalized home page, where artists and companies (including Jeff Koons, Bob Dylan and Gucci) contributed images to be used as skins.

“While we don’t typically offer monetary compensation for these projects,” the statement said, “through the positive feedback that we have heard thus far we believe these projects provide a unique and exciting opportunity for artists to display their work in front of millions of people.”

But exposure often is a given for illustrators, who are rankled that Google is asking them to work for exposure alone.

“I have done gift cards for Target that are in stores nationwide and animations for Nickelodeon that run 24 hours a day worldwide on cable TV,” Melinda Beck, an illustrator who is based in Brooklyn, wrote in an e-mail message to Google rejecting its offer. “Both of these jobs were high-profile and gave my work great exposure but both clients still paid me.”

Fade In Editor-in-Chief Speaks Out About TheWrap Story

6a00d8341bfc7553ef00e54f2bd4cf8833-640wi.jpgWe posted a story that TheWrap did about the screenwriting contest at Fade In. There had been several reports from people that won the contest and didn’t get their promised prizes over the years. Then we got a threatening letter from Fade In‘s lawyers (which is all our lawyers say we can say about it).

Then the editor-in-chief of Fade In, Audrey Kelly sent us this email last night.

AN IMPORTANT LETTER FROM FADE IN’S EDITOR IN CHIEF

Well, they’ll stone ya when you’re trying to be so good,
They’ll stone ya just a-like they said they would.
They’ll stone ya when you’re tryin’ to go home.
Then they’ll stone ya when you’re there all alone.
But I would not feel so all alone,
Everybody must get stoned.

- Bob Dylan

WRAP THIS
Did a new entertainment media competitor maliciously attack Fade In and its editor in chief in order to attract readers to its new website or is there something more sinister going on besides sloppy reporting? You decide.

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Film Threat Unveils 50 Most Frigid In Hollywood

heath.jpgFilm Threat, the snarky, biting answer to the film industry’s constant inhouse sniping, opens its 50 Most Frigid in Hollywood with Heath Ledger and the politically incorrect, bad taste query: “Why so deceased?”

Heath Ledger was an actor on the climb, albeit a rather subtle one, to the upper ranks of his profession. While “10 Things I Hate About You” and “A Knight’s Tale” weren’t necessarily Oscar-contenders, at least one of them was based on Shakespeare. And while playing second fiddle to Mel Gibson in “The Patriot” wasn’t a star-making turn, playing the skin flute with Jake Gyllenhaal in “Brokeback Mountain” and playing pseudo-Bob Dylan in “I’m Not There” were worthy of increased respect and recognition. Everything was pointing up and Ledger’s role as the Joker was the prize fruit he’d been climbing towards.

The pesky mag goes on to bemoan:

Carmen Electra: Mindless tits and ass have their place in society, but her body has been duping people into paying for shit cinema for far too long, and it’s not even as if folks are paying to see her naked! We’re not saying the only good Carmen Electra is a naked Carmen Electra (okay, maybe we are), but how bad is it when Pamela Anderson is making more informed, and memorable, career decisions?

Pacino and De Niro: “Everybody said how great it was that De Niro was getting together with Pacino again after teaming up in ‘Heat,’ conveniently forgetting that one of the things that made ‘Heat’ so effective was the fact they were only in one scene together…”

Katherine Heigl: “It’s so simple it’s cliche, but if she doesn’t have anything nice to say, and she wants to keep working, she might want to shut up…”

You said it, Film Threat…

Jack A. Weil: Where All The Cowboys Have Gone

15weil.span.jpg
The oldest CEO in the world Jack A. Weil, inventor of the snap button cowboy shirt has died at age 107.

AP reports:

Weil’s shirts have been worn in movies by Elvis Presley, Clark Gable (in his last film, “The Misfits”) and Heath Ledger (“Brokeback Mountain.”) Bob Dylan, John Fogerty and Eric Clapton also have sported the shirts.

The price of a shirt has gone from about $2 in the 1940s to $60 and up today, mostly because the Weils kept manufacturing operations in the United States.

Jack Weil remained chief executive officer of Rockmount and went to work daily until a few days before his death, his grandson said.

We also like the quote from the NYTimes about why he still made his clothes in the US:

“I never wanted to be the richest man in the cemetery,” he said.

The weird thing is that the LAT doesn’t have an obit up for him as of this posting. Tough town.

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