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Posts Tagged ‘Brandon Holley’

Anna Wintour’s Hand of Death Hovers Over Glamour

Death gaze!

Ever since Anna Wintour was named artistic director of Condé Nast, her power and influence have grown. As we’ve mentioned, that has meant bad things for Condé editors who aren’t up to snuff. The New York Times reports that Wintour’s death gaze has now turn to Glamour, which means Cindi Leive, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, had better look alive. While she can.

Recently Wintour signed off on the firing of Klara Glowczewska (the longtime editor of Condé Nast Traveler) and Brandon Holley (the editor of Lucky). Pilar Guzmán and Eva Chen — their replacements, respectively — were Wintour endorsed. With that done, Wintour’s icy hand of death has started flipping the pages of Glamour:

Now Ms. Wintour is turning her attention to Glamour, which has lost over 28 percent of its newsstand sales in the year ending in June, and perhaps other magazines as well. According to a magazine executive at a competing company with direct knowledge of the discussions, a creative director at his company was approached about working in a similar role for Glamour, and told that the post would report to Ms. Wintour, not Cindi Leive, the magazine’s editor. (Mr. Townsend acknowledged the discussions, but said the reporting line detail was “dead wrong.”)

Of course Wintour maintains that editors shouldn’t feel like her presence means they should update their wills.

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John Sykes, Tommy Hilfiger and a Real-Life Warrior Princess

1003_mockup.gifAs the faithful readers of this column already know, lunch at Michael’s is never really just about lunch, but it is (usually) a lot of fun. And today was no exception. I was invited to join a ‘girl’s lunch’ for author Mindy Budgor hosted by Jolie Hunt, AOL’s former chief marketing officer. Jolie, who knows practically everyone in New York, told me she decided to get a group of women together for Mindy, who recently moved here from Chicago, and “pop her Michael’s cherry.” Alrighty then. When Mindy asked if she knew “any interesting women in New York,” Jolie sprung into action and gathered The Wall Street Journal‘s media editor Keach HageyKyle Gibson, executive producer of Newsweek The Daily Beast‘s Women in the World; Deborah Needleman, editor of The New Yorks Times T magazine; recently departed Lucky EIC Brandon HolleySara Nelson, Amazon editorial director of books and Kindle, Wenda Harris Millard and yours truly to dine and dish at Table One. Mindy brought along former Today show senior producer-turned-media trainer Amy Rosenblum and Andrea Lustig, author and contributing editor for Glamour.

I chatted (OTR, sorry) with newlywed Sara Nelson (Congrats!) and Brandon Holley before we sat down for lunch. Uber chic Brandon, who I first met during her days at Yahoo! Shine, told me she’s planning to spend the summer with her family in Montauk. I can’t say I blame her. When the rest of the gang arrived we sat in rapt attention as guest of honor Mindy told the story behind her new book, Warrior Princess, My Quest to Become the First Female Maasai Warrior (Allen & Unwin). I hadn’t known what to expect when Jolie told me she was hosting this gathering for her friend who was — really — the first ever female Maasai warrior. I certainly didn’t expect her to be the sweet 30-year-old woman sporting a Bulgari pendant I mistook for some tribal gem who regaled the group of tales of slaughtering goats and cows and drinking their blood (so much for my appetite.)

Jolie Hunt, Mindy Budgor and Diane Clehane

It turns out a woman’s magazine has an exclusive on Mindy’s story — the details are very hush-hush — so I’m not allowed to share the jaw-dropping tale she told us over lunch. Before I was advised of the embargo, I asked why this self-described “nice, Jewish girl” decided to quit her job in Chicago and go off to Kenya, and she told me, “I felt my values were out of whack.”

I’m sworn to secrecy on the rest of her story (a first at Michael’s, I know), but I can share what’s on Mindy’s own website. The Santa Barbara native bought a ticket to Kenya and set off to volunteer building schools and hospitals in the Maasai Mara. While she was there, she asked the chief why there were no female warriors. After being told that women “are not strong enough or brave enough,” Mindy and her fellow volunteer, Becca, knew what they had to do. Her journey from bored MBA student to fearless female warrior is definitely inspiring. No doubt there’s plenty of lessons in the book (and some interesting photos from her time in Kenya) for those of us trying to survive in the concrete jungle. I’m starting Warrior Princess tonight.  Read more

The Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for The Week

Here’s a look at the FishbowlNY stories that made the most buzz this week.

1) Bill Evans and Wife Charged with Assault and Disorderly Conduct

2) Janice Minn Announces Five Promotions, Nine More Hires

3) Brandon Holley Out at Lucky, Eva Chen Succeeds Her

4) Rolling Stone Writer Stands by Report of Serena Williams’ Rape Comments

5) Bauer Publishing to Launch Three New Magazines Because Why Not?

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Michael Hastings Dies | Holley Out at Lucky | NYT Blogs Shuttering


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Michael Hastings, Rolling Stone Contributor, Dead at 33
(Rolling Stone)
Michael Hastings, the fearless journalist whose reporting brought down the career of General Stanley McChrystal, has died in a car accident in Los Angeles, Rolling Stone has learned. He was 33. Hastings’ unvarnished 2010 profile of McChrystal in the pages of Rolling Stone, “The Runaway General,” captured the then-supreme commander of the U.S.-led war effort in Afghanistan openly mocking his civilian commanders in the White House. The maelstrom sparked by its publication concluded with President Obama recalling McChrystal to Washington and the general resigning his post. BuzzFeed We are shocked and devastated by the news that Hastings is gone. He was a great, fearless journalist with an incredible instinct for the story, and a gift for finding ways to make his readers care about anything he covered from wars to politicians. BuzzFeed / Ben Smith Hastings was really only interested in writing stories someone didn’t want him to write — often his subjects; occasionally his editor. While there is no template for a great reporter, he was one for reasons that were intrinsic to who he was: ambitious, skeptical of power and conventional wisdom, and incredibly brave. And he was warm and honest in a way that left him many unlikely friends among people you’d expect to hate him. Slate / Weigel As one of the journalists who was lucky to know him, first admiring his work as a reader, then thinking “Oh thank God” whenever we reconnected on the 2012 campaign trail, I’m having trouble working through the pathetic injustice of this situation. GalleyCat Hastings was the author of The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan and I Lost My Love in Baghdad. NY Mag / Daily Intelligencer “A lot of people in the news business want to seem unafraid,” Rachel Maddow said on her show. “Hastings was actually unafraid. To the point where he radiated a sort of energy that made you realize he was unafraid, and it made you treat him differently than other people in the business.” Read more

Brandon Holley Out at Lucky, Eva Chen Succeeds Her

The Brandon Holley era at Lucky is over. Eva Chen has been named the new editor-in-chief of the magazine, thus officially ending Holley’s three-year run.

Holley was a veteran of Condé Nast. She was a senior editor at GQ from 1998 to 2000 and served as editor-in-chief of Jane, from 2005 to 2007. She came to Lucky in 2010. Holley told Mediabistro that as editor, she wanted to do right by its readers. “I’ve been talking to a lot of women,” she explained. “They love this magazine. So it’s my job just to bring my take to it. It’s not about scrapping it. It’s a really great magazine and women really do love it. And I’m going to bring my angle.”

Holley, according to Condé Nast, is now leaving the company. We’ve reached out to Condé for further comment, and we’ll update when we hear back.

Chen has been serving as a consultant for Lucky, working closely with Anna Wintour. So it’s of little surprise that Wintour was pleased with the move. In a statement, Wintour called Chen “The quintessential Lucky girl.”

Lucky is Sorry for Making Britney Spears Look Terrible

Hell hath no fury like a Britney Spears fan scorned. If the editors of Lucky magazine didn’t know this already, they do now. Fans of the pop star directed their outrage at the magazine for its December cover, which features a seriously plastic-looking Spears donning a wig.

On Twitter, Spears enthusiasts blasted Lucky for the photo, calling it “horrendous” and “lazy & unprofessional.” One fan even asked the magazine to do another shoot with the real Spears.

The backlash was so excessive, Lucky issued the following apology:

Read more

Lucky and Architectural Digest Launch iPad Editions

Lucky and Architectural Digest have finally come to the iPad. As of now, the only Condé titles not on the iPad are Details, W and Teen VogueWWD reports that the move to the iPad is especially important for Lucky, as ad pages are down 20 percent through September.

One of Lucky’s biggest lures on the iPad is giving users the ability to click on any single product and be directed to the designer’s site so they can purchase it. Brandon Holley, editor-in-chief of Lucky, told WWD that the app is, “The most shoppable digital edition of any magazine.” She’s surely not being biased.

Both Lucky and AD’s iPad apps are free for print subscribers. Single issues, monthly and yearly app subscriptions are also available.

Ann Curry, Calvin Klein and a Real-Life Seinfeld Character

1003_mockup.gifForget about the dog days of summer. The stifling heat couldn’t keep the faithful away from Michael’s today. In fact, many of the power lunchers showed up early to escape the oppressive temps which made for a jam packed dining room. The always unflappable Loreal Sherman kept everything running smoothly as usual, finding just the right table for everyone despite the SRO crowd. At Michael’s, you are where you sit after all.

I was joined today by Scott Singer, managing director of Discover Digital Group where he helps media companies identify and build e-commerce businesses, as well as assisting them in growing their existing digital assets. When he’s not navigating his clients through the changing world of social media and mobile advertising, Scott is also a passionate author. In his first book, How to Hit a Curveball: Confront and Overcome the Unexpected in Business (Portfolio, 2010), Scott took on the question on everyone’s mind at the time: how to survive and thrive after the 2008 financial meltdown and subsequent Great Recession. “I’ve spent my career advising companies (including CBS/Viacom and Disney) on how to overcome and confront change,” Scott told me. After enduring his own series of personal and professional ‘curveballs’ —  his job as head of digital media and internet infrastructure at Bear Sterns was a fatality of the tech bubble, his brother was in one of the towers at the World Trade Center on 9/11 but thankfully survived and he got divorced (“My marriage ended in a death spiral,” he writes in the book), Scott told me he learned that “None of us know what the future holds but, once you’ve learned how to confront and overcome the unexpected, it will stop making you anxious. Tomorrow will no longer be something to fear and that’s a great feeling.”

Diane Clehane and Scott Singer
Diane Clehane and Scott Singer

Cleverly outlining his insights using baseball terminology, Scott leads the reader from ‘spring training’ all the way through ‘an extra inning’ and includes the wisdom of those who have always aimed for the fences, like CBS honcho Les Moonves, former Time Warner CEO Jerry Levin and Michael J. Fox.

Scott’s best advice: Step up to the plate and accept what is, be the batter and keep your eye on the ball. A self-proclaimed enthusiast for the latest and best gadgets on the market, Scott says these rules are easily applicable in business, especially when it comes to new technology. Change is happening every minute and the only way to win is to embrace it and be an early adapter. Just look at our kids.

“Every child today is born digital. It’s in their DNA, while those people that are passing away are analog. We’re digital immigrants,” he says. “My 14 year-old son is my IT support. It’s amazing to think of all the innovations the digital generation is going to create.”

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Lucky‘s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

Media Beat banner

In the final segment of our Media Beat interview with Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley, the print vet talked about the explosion of street style, where women can find designer goods (or versions of them) for cheap, and that hot-button issue every magazine editor grapples with: Photoshop.

Sure, a petition against Seventeen has the pub pledging to feature more “healthy, real women,” but is it even possible for a magazine to succeed without airbrushing its models? Uh, no, said Holley.

“I’ve done a bunch of focus groups, and women will constantly say, ‘Why don’t you just put a real person on the cover? I don’t wanna see a celebrity.’ That cover would sell 10 copies,” said Holley. “So, what women say they want and what they want are two different things sometimes. I mean, we do need to show more women with real bodies, absolutely. But I don’t think that should be a dead set rule.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

Media Beat banner

In the final segment of our Media Beat interview with Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley, the print vet talked about the explosion of street style, where women can find designer goods (or versions of them) for cheap, and that hot-button issue every magazine editor grapples with: Photoshop.

Sure, a petition against Seventeen has the pub pledging to feature more “healthy, real women,” but is it even possible for a magazine to succeed without airbrushing its models? Uh, no, said Holley.

“I’ve done a bunch of focus groups, and women will constantly say, ‘Why don’t you just put a real person on the cover? I don’t wanna see a celebrity.’ That cover would sell 10 copies,” said Holley. “So, what women say they want and what they want are two different things sometimes. I mean, we do need to show more women with real bodies, absolutely. But I don’t think that should be a dead set rule.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

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