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Posts Tagged ‘BusinessWeek:’

Businessweek Pulls Article Ranking Schools by Girls’ ‘Hotness’ [Update]

Businessweek is in hot water for a piece ranking business schools according to the attractiveness of its female students. When the poll was published, the backlash began. On Twitter, people were genuinely shocked and upset that such a piece would run in the magazine. Even the poll itself — now yanked from Businessweek’s site — caught angry comments from readers.

“BusinessWeek, this demeans women by suggesting our function is to be ‘decorative’, demeans those considering business school by suggesting this is a ‘story that matters’, and demeans your publcation by suggesting that you think this kind of thing is acceptable,” wrote one woman.

Here is the Google cache version of the “hotness” poll, via Daily Dot. The piece and the tweet about the poll are both gone, but there has yet to be a statement about it from Businessweek.

UPDATE:

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Doug Cantor, Others Join Businessweek

Doug Cantor is joining Businessweek as its new technology editor. Capital New York reports that Cantor will succeed Barrett Sheridan, who is leaving for a fellowship at Columbia University’s journalism school. Cantor comes to Businessweek from Popular Science, where he served as senior editor since 2006.

Additionally, Jeff Muskus and Nick Summers have joined the magazine. Muskus was most recently a senior editor at The Huffington Post and is now an associate editor at Businessweek. Summers comes to Businessweek from Newsweek/The Daily Beast. Summers is now a finance correspondent.

Cover Battle: Businessweek or Fortune

We have a dilemma here at FishbowlNY. We can’t decide which cover we came across this morning we like best. Businessweek’s is fantastic (cover story about Karl Rove’s power moves) but so is Fortune’s (cover story about Hostess going bankrupt again).

So we leave it up to you, dear readers. Which cover is better? Also, and you might not be able to answer this — if Hostess does finally disappear, does that mean Ding Dongs do too? Because if so, we’ve got some stockpiling to do.

Josh Tyrangiel and Businessweek’s Impossible Goal

Much has been made of Josh Tyrangielthe Editor-in-Chief of Bloomberg Businessweek — and his success at reinventing the magazine since he was brought aboard, and rightfully so: He has done a great job, and FishbowlNY has never been shy at pointing out how much we love the title.

When WWD profiled Tyrangiel back in February, he said that his mission was to make Businessweek more appealing, and today Adweek reports that while ad pages are up and the rate base is increasing, newsstand sales keep falling. Not the darkest news, but it makes us wonder if Businessweek will ever be the “must read” Tyrangiel wants it to be.

It’s not that Tyrangiel doesn’t have a good plan; he does. Bringing in Richard Turley to design the magazine was a brilliant move. He also understands what readers want out of a print experience.

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Did BusinessWeek Waste $20 Million on Website Before Sale to Bloomberg?

Whoops! A private direct message exchange between tech blogger Anil Dash and designer/publisher Jeffrey Zeldman accidentally wasn’t so private after all, and broadcast to the entire Twitterverse that BusinessWeek wasted $20 million on a publishing platform before the losses became too much, New York Observer reports.

“They bought a $20 million b*llshit CMS then laid off staff and went bankrupt as a direct result. Bloomberg bought them and laid off more staffers. Staffers were blameless in $20 M CMS debacle yet they took the hit for it,” Zeldman wrote.

And then: “Oh sh*t I thought those were DMs… Probably wasn’t public knowledge until 2 min ago.”

Uh oh! (And, how exciting!) But bear in mind that $20 million is an astronomical amount of money for a CMS system, so seems inaccurate. Moreover, former BusinessWeek creative director David Sleight tweetedBusinessWeek did not go bankrupt or buy a $20M CMS.”  He said he believes Zeldman may have been referring to technology that was bought for McGraw Hill’s Business Exchange.

FT Appointments|Nielsen’s New Ratings|McGraw-Hill Earnings|Davos Colors|WSJ‘s Travel Agency

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Editor & Publisher: The Financial Times makes a number of staff appointments.

AdAge: Nielsen will combine TV and online ratings.

New York Times: Former BusinessWeek publisher McGraw-Hill today posted increased earnings for the fourth quarter.

The Business Insider: Reporters at the World Economic Forum in Davos are getting color coded.

MediaPost: In search of another source of revenue, The Wall Street Journal is launching a travel agency this week.

Variety For Sale|AOL Hires Gourmet Editors|BusinessWeek Pulls Twitter Article|Ruth Reichl

The Wrap: Variety is up for sale after all.

NY Post: Amidst layoffs, AOL is still hiring, picking up a dozen staffers formerly of Conde Nast‘s shuttered Gourmet magazine to work for a food site the company hopes to launch next month.

Talking Biz News: BusinessWeek pulled a story about Twitter from its Web site after some bad math “rendered its premise incorrect.”

Mediaite: Ruth Reichl talks about the shock of Gourmet‘s closing.

FishbowlNY Readers Respond: The Media’s Biggest Misstep In 2009 Was Gourmet‘s Closing

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Wow, people really cared about Condé Nast‘s epicurean magazine Gourmet, huh? Not only did our readers vote it the saddest magazine closing in 2009, but also the biggest media misstep (by 39 percent) made in a year that was chock-full of wrong turns and dead-ends.

Surprisingly, nobody thought BusinessWeek‘s sale to Bloomberg LP was the biggest mistake (except for former BusinessWeek employees, of course), while only 4 percent thought that The New York Post‘s firing of editor Sandra Guzman after speaking out against its controversial cartoon was the biggest blunder. In fact, what about the cartoon itself, which we didn’t put on our poll but certainly belongs in the Top 10 “D’oh!” moments of 2009.

Meanwhile coming in second place was our all-encompassing reference to “Everything the Tribune Co. has done this year,” which ranges from endlessly pushing back their filing of a Chapter 11 reorganization plan while their lenders grew impatient, to letting some of their best writers and editors go over to the Chicago News Cooperative. All of those things lead to 24 percent of our readers shaking their heads at the many, many mistakes of Sam Zell and Tribune Co.

With 12 percent of the votes, readers chose to pick Rupert Murdoch‘s war with Google as the biggest mistake of the year…although since Murdoch has yet to act on his threats, and the move to Microsoft’s Bing might actually be beneficial to Murdoch and other news companies in the long run, we’ll have to wait to see how that pans out.

Coming in with four percent was Long Island newspaper Newsday‘s decision to put up a pay wall for its Web site, so have fun paying for your news next year, guys. Also given four percent of the vote was Reader’s Digest‘s bankruptcy filing, though the publisher’s decision to shut down Purpose Driven Connection was probably one of the best moves of the year.

And of course, nine percent of our readers decided to be contrary and choose “Other.” Maybe they were thinking that the government’s lack of a bailout for the media was the biggest misstep we saw in 2009?

Previously: Reader’s Digest Files For Ch. 11, What Was The Media’s Biggest Misstep in 2009?, Video: News Corp. Gets Grinchy With Google , Is the New York Post Comparing Obama to a Rabid Monkey?

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: New York Media’s Biggest Business Decisions

4 times square.jpgNew York is home to some of the biggest media companies in the country, like Condé Nast, The New York Times Co., News Corp., Hearst and Time Warner, just to name a few.

This year, those companies were imperiled, struggling to survive like many other companies around the world. But as print media disputed declarations that its days were numbered, these once-great companies that made their money from print pubs were fighting hard to keep their heads above water. In order to do that they made some decisions — like bringing in new investors, closing publications and selling them off. It was in no way a big year for media deals, but there were a few. Below, our list of the biggest business stories to come out of the New York media world this year.

Bloomberg LP Buys BusinessWeek

After seeking a buyer for BusinessWeek for most of the fall, publisher McGraw-Hill finally cut a deal with Bloomberg LP, which snapped up the magazine in October. The result? Bloomberg BusinessWeek, a new vision of the mag that has a new editor and a smaller staff.

After the jump, Carlos Slim invests in the Times, classical music and the Comcast-NBCU deal.

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FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

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