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Posts Tagged ‘Caitlin Flanagan’

The Atlantic–150 Years Old

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The Atlantic celebrates 150 years of publishing with a special anniversary issue. Also, there’s an essay contest for readers on The American Idea in 200 words or less, which is a blog post.

Benjamin Schwarz reviews a couple of books on Hollywood history and comes to a conclusion all his own:

Moviemaking in Hollywood’s classical period was colossally complex, backbreakingly difficult, obscenely expensive–and it almost always failed.

One of the books is by Jeanine Basinger, who encouraged Michael Bay, which is enough to damn her to a slummy corner of hell. (James Harvey is a better historian and writer, too.)

Schwarz writes “No wonder Hollywood’s “golden age” is a history of driven, freakishly hardworking, unhappy people, including its show-horse stars” which is dramatic but overlooks the hundreds of talented craftspeople and artists (many of them gay) employed by the studios who wouldn’t have flourished back home on the farm, especially during the Depression. Making movies was as close to making art as many working people were ever going to get, and Hollywood still resonates with their legacy. So, while he’s a wonderful writer, we don’t agree.

Caitlin Flanagan, whom so many love to hate, knocks out a killer piece about another woman who inspires mixed emotions–Hilary Rodham Clinton. It all started with Socks.

Semi-new Angelena Virginia Postrel writes about real estate, and philosophically compares Dallas to LA.

Michael Hirschorn wonders if celebrities can survive too much information. He writes:

Justin Timberlake, like Nick Carter a veteran ’90s boy-bander (in his case N’Sync), may be the only truly bankable star of the blogger era. He deftly melds old-school Rat Pack glamour with new-school multimedia omnipresence, talent, and taste.

Also, Timberlake can make fun of himself, ala Dick in a Box. Like he has a choice.

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The Atlantic: July/August Issue

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The Atlantic crosses the Pacific, for a China-themed issue.

National correspondent James Fallows, who moved to Shanghai in 2006, has a cover story on China’s riseas a manufacturing is good. Fallows writes:

Here is an uncomfortable truth I’m waiting for some Chinese official to point out: The woman from the hinterland working in Shenzhen is arguably better off economically than an American in Chicago living on minimum wage. She can save most of what she makes and feel she is on the way up; the American can’t and doesn’t.

How Fallows knows what a minimum-wage earning woman in Chicago feels isn’t stated–maybe she’s a PA for Oprah, living at home, and she’s thrilled.

The magazine must have gone to press before the food additives scandal surfaced.

Also in this issue:

Caitlin Flanagan on on-line predators,while confessing to a little weird stalking thing of her own.

Virginia Postrel on Hollywood’s master glamour photographer, George Hurrell.

Corby Kummer on fresh sardines, now available up and down the California coast.

April Atlantic Preview

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Caitlin Flanagan reviews College Girls: Bluestockings, Sex Kitten and Co-eds by Lynn Peril Norton in the April Atlantic. Flanagan, whom we quite like, makes the dubious case that leaving home is harder on girls than on boys. Flanagan needs to wait til her kids grow up before she decides this stuff, as her own experience isn’t universal.

James Fallows weighs in on a reality show in China, Ying Zai Zhongguo, or Win in China, which is not unlike The Apprentice. He learned of the series “from a Chinese-American friend, Baifang Schell, who was involved in the production.” Schell’s married to Orville Schell, the dean of the J-School at UCBerkley. Oddly, FBLA can’t think of many American reality shows with that kind of imprinteur. Fallows went to China for the final episode, which he found fascinating, but it’s unlikely he’s watched very many other reality shows. There’s a video segment with business types praising the show against a music track so soul-stirringly uplifting and gloppily romantic that it could be an promo for a very special Oprah segment.

Andrew Sullivan’s daily blog is also on the site, and today, he’s after Dinesh D’Souza.