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Posts Tagged ‘Chicago Sun-Times’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Raven to Retire From A&E | NBC Undecided on Virgin Galactic Series

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A&E Networks Chairman Abbe Raven to Retire (THR)
Cable pioneer Abbe Raven is set to retire. Her last day as chairman of A&E Networks will be Feb. 2. The news comes nearly a year after Raven’s protégé, Nancy Dubuc, was elevated to CEO and Raven to chairman. Deadline Hollywood Dubuc took oversight of the day-to-day operations of the company, while Raven remained in charge of A&E Networks’ long-term business and revenue opportunities, including distribution, as well as public policy initiatives and corporate outreach. A year ago, Dubuc also took over distribution. She will remain president and CEO. Variety Raven’s role as chairman will not be filled. Raven is without question one of key architects of A&E Networks’ growth, particularly in the past 15 years. The company, a joint venture of Hearst Corp. and Disney, is home to some of cable’s most prosperous channels, but as a private concern it is shielded from quarterly earnings scrutiny. Under Raven and Dubuc, A&E has rapidly expanded its domestic and international portfolio, which generates an estimated $3.8 billion in annual revenue. TheWrap Prior to her position as president and CEO, Raven held high level executive roles at the company’s properties A&E Network, The Biography Channel and The History Channel. WSJ The handoff also comes at a challenging time. After setting cable-television ratings records last year with hits like Duck Dynasty on A&E and The Bible on History, the company’s two biggest channels have endured sharp declines this year. A&E’s ratings are down 32 percent so far this year in total viewers and 25 percent in its target demographic of 25- to 54-year olds, while History’s ratings are down 15 percent in both total viewers and those 25 to 54.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Snyderman Back to NBC | World News Skips Midterm Coverage

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Despite Criticism, Dr. Nancy Snyderman Will Return to NBC News (TVNewser)
NBC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Nancy Snyderman will return to work, but it won’t be until next month. NBC News president Deborah Turness informed the network’s employees of the decision in an internal email Wednesday evening. CNNMoney The timing is noteworthy because Snyderman’s apparent violation of a voluntary quarantine scared some members of her New Jersey community and stoked a major controversy earlier this month. Questions about her credibility have lingered and she has not addressed those questions publicly. The Washington Post / Erik Wemple In the memo, Turness celebrates the recovery of freelance cameraman Ashoka Mukpo and the impending end of the 21-day quarantine binding on Snyderman and NBC News crew members who reported several weeks ago from Liberia. “While in Liberia Dr. Nancy and her team delivered first class, first-hand reporting from the front lines of this tragic and monumental story,” writes Turness. While with Snyderman and co. in Africa, Mukpo contracted the Ebola virus and was flown to a Nebraska hospital. Deadline Hollywood Tuesday, Mukpo, officially declared Ebola-free by experts at the Nebraska Medical Center bio-containment unit, celebrated by attempting to rescue Snyderman from the career-nuking situation she created when she violated the voluntary quarantine she’d agreed to, on-air, tweeting “Be nice to her plz.” TVNewser Expect to see Mukpo on NBC News. The network is already promoting “exclusive interviews” with him.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Lewis Katz Dies | Carney Steps Down | Zuckerberg Donates

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Co-Owner of Philadelphia Inquirer Dies in Plane Crash (Philly.com)
Lewis Katz, 72, co-owner of The Philadelphia Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News and Philly.com, died Saturday night in the crash of a private jet at a Massachusetts airfield. All seven people aboard were killed when the Gulfstream IV crashed about 9:40 p.m. as it was departing Hanscom Field in Bedford for Atlantic City International Airport, said a Massachusetts Port Authority spokesman. Boston Globe The plane exploded in a blast that sent a fireball and a large plume of black smoke into the air, said Bedford resident Jeff Patterson, 43, who lives beside the runway. The flames rose 60 feet in the air, he said. His 14-year-old son, Jared, said the explosion rattled the house. Bloomberg Katz and H.F. “Gerry” Lenfest won control of the Inquirer and its sister publication at a court-ordered auction four days earlier. A native of Camden, N.J., Katz was increasingly involved with his philanthropic giving. In May, Temple University announced it would name its medical school after Katz, who told the Inquirer that while his mother wanted him to be a doctor, he couldn’t stand the sight of blood. CNN Katz was formerly the principal owner of the NBA’s New Jersey Nets and the NHL’s New Jersey Devils. He was a shareholder of the Nets, the New York Yankees and the YES Network at the time of his death. New York Daily News The Yankees honored long-time minority owner Katz in the Bronx with a moment of silence before the national anthem on Sunday at the Stadium. Katz will be remembered for his hot-and-cold relationship with George Steinbrenner. NPR / The Two-Way Drew Katz, Lewis’ son, said in a statement that his father’s sudden death has brought “an incomprehensible amount of grief.” He added: “My father was my best friend. He taught me everything. He never forgot where and how he grew up, and he worked tirelessly to support his community in countless ways that were seen and unseen. He loved his native city of Camden and his adopted home of Philadelphia.” Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Comcast Courts FCC | Kasell to Retire From NPR | CNN’s Primetime Test

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Comcast Points to NBCU Deal to Convince Regulators (Financial Times)
Comcast is trumpeting its compliance with conditions attached to its 2009 acquisition of NBCUniversal as a model for how to convince regulators to approve its $45.2 billion bid for rival cable operator Time Warner Cable. Variety Comcast launched another prong in its strategy, announcing a pledge to continue offering basic broadband for $9.95 per month to low-income families indefinitely. Effectively, the cable giant is spinning the expanded low-cost Internet Essentials program as one of the key benefits of the proposed deal for Time Warner Cable — despite the fact that post-deal, Comcast would control nearly one-third of U.S. broadband market. CNET Comcast started the Internet Essentials program as part of a voluntary commitment it made to the Federal Communications Commission in order to get its merger with NBCUniversal approved. Back then, the company promised to keep the program up and running for three years. Adweek The program provides eligible low-income families with $9.95/month Internet service, an option to purchase a computer for under $150 and multiple options for digital literacy training. In two and a half years, Comcast has signed up 1.2 million low-income Americans or 300,000 families. Internet Essentials dovetails nicely with President Obama’s ConnectED program to increase digital literacy and the FCC’s recent plan to invest an additional $2 billion over the next two years to support broadband in schools and libraries. Bloomberg Comcast executive VP David Cohen will hold meetings at the FCC through Wednesday, said two agency officials knowledgeable about the plans. Comcast, the largest U.S. cable company, needs approval from the FCC and antitrust officials at the Justice Department for its proposed purchase of New York-based Time Warner Cable, the No. 2 carrier. The Time Warner deal would create “appropriate scale” that enables Comcast to invest in new services, and would create a new national advertiser to increase competition in that market, Cohen said.

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Roger Ebert Documentary Filmmaker on the Sequence He Was Happy to Let Get Away

ShutterstockRogerEbertThere was a fantastic interview over the weekend in Roger Ebert‘s paper of record, the Chicago Sun-Times, with the filmmaker getting ready to unveil at Sundance a feature documentary about the late critic.

Anyone who was a regular, early viewer of Siskel & Ebert likely recalls the pair championing Steve JamesHoop Dreams, long before there was a documentary renaissance and-or it was fashionable to hype non-fiction. As many have noted, it’s extra-special to now have James, a filmmaker who rose up alongside Ebert and his balcony-jousting partner, revisit the journalist’s life story posthumously.

At one point in the conversation with Sun-Times reporter Mike Thomas, James recalls the moments immediately following Ebert’s passing and how, although it would have made for an incredible sequence, he was glad in the end that one event turned out to be for his eyes and those of a few others, only:

“[His body] was in the chapel at the Rehab Institute. I said [to his wife Chaz], “Look, I brought the camera, but it’s sitting over there and we don’t have to film at all.” His body was lying in the chapel and there were a few close family [members] and friends and business associates, and I felt privileged to just be there among them. Everyone held hands and we all said the Lord’s Prayer, because that apparently was a prayer that Roger [liked] a lot.”

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Jim DeRogatis on Why ‘Monster’ R. Kelly Keeps Getting Free Media Pass

RKellyBlackPantiesThere’s some powerful history bonding Village Voice contributor Jessica Hopper to Jim DeRogatis, the journalist who some 15 years ago as a music critic for the Chicago Sun-Times exposed R. Kelly‘s shocking indiscretions with underage girls. The rapper was later acquitted.

Hopper recalls her feuding with DeRogatis and what it led to:

DeRogatis approached me offline and told me about how one of Kelly’s victims called him in the middle of the night after his Pitchfork [festival] review came out, to thank him for caring when no one else did. He told me of mothers crying on his shoulder, seeing the scars of a suicide attempt on a girl’s wrists, the fear in their eyes. He detailed an aftermath that the public has never had to bear witness to.

DeRogatis, now a teacher at Columbia College and host of a public radio show, remains steadfast. The media has and continues to ignore a story that is right under their noses:

“Rapes, plural. It is on record. Rapes in the dozen. So stop hedging your words, and when you tell me what a brilliant ode to pussy Black Panties is, then realize that the next sentence should say: ‘This, from a man who has committed numerous rapes.’ The guy was a monster! Just say it! We do have a justice system and he was acquitted. OK, fine. And these other women took the civil lawsuit route.”

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Nicole Remini Fact-Checks the Chicago Sun-Times

First, there was Paul Haggis; then, no doubt, the fear that Katie Holmes would speak out if wrongly handled. One summer later, after the Cruise-Holmes divorce, the Church of Scientology’s media relations folks (and outside crisis PR firm) must now deal with the media pit stops of Leah Remini‘s feisty older sister Nicole.

It started, as we reported, with a Minneapolis-St.Paul FM radio station (Remini lives in the area). Today, it continues – and oh, how it continues – with The Underground Bunker’s Tony Ortega.

One detail that jumped out for us is Nicole’s allegation that a portion of Bill Zwecker‘s Sun-Times column is completely erroneous. Here’s what Zwecker wrote:

Since then I’ve learned the two actresses [Leah Remini, Kirstie Alley] have chatted and there is no loss of friendship.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Rolling Stone Banned | Huntsman Joins MSNBC | Sun-Times Layoffs


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Rolling Stone‘s ‘The Bomber’ Issue Banned by CVS, Walgreens, Rite Aid And Kmart (HuffPost)
Multiple retailers and drug stores say they won’t be selling this week’s Rolling Stone, which features Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover. “As a company with deep roots in New England and a strong presence in Boston, we believe this is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones,” CVS wrote in a statement. Boston Herald Boston mayor Thomas M. Menino wrote to the publisher of Rolling Stone, telling him the decision to put accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover “rewards a terrorist with celebrity treatment” — treatment the magazine should have given to the survivors. “The survivors of the Boston attacks deserve Rolling Stone cover stories,” Menino wrote in a letter to Jann Wenner, “though I no longer feel that Rolling Stone deserves them.” Rolling Stone Our hearts go out to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing, and our thoughts are always with them and their families. The cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and Rolling Stone’s long-standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day. The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens. PRNewser A calm, eloquent response that respectfully explains the publication’s intentions, and defends the cover and article without actually sounding defensive. While this will likely do little to assuage those who are offended — it is not, by any means, an apology — it may at least open the floor for candid and civilized conversation. New Yorker / NewsDesk Just because something sparks outrage doesn’t mean that it is outrageous. The vitriol and closed-mindedness of the Web response to the Rolling Stone cover, before anyone had the chance to read the article itself, is an example of two of the ugly public outcomes of terrorism: hostility toward free expression, and to the collection and examination of factual evidence; and a kind of culture-wide self-censorship encouraged by tragedy, in which certain responses are deemed correct and anything else is dismissed as tasteless or out of bounds. Slate / BrowBeat By depicting a terrorist as sweet and handsome rather than ugly and terrifying, Rolling Stone has subverted our expectations and hinted at a larger truth. The cover presents a stark contrast with our usual image of terrorists. It asks, “What did we expect to see in Tsarnaev? What did we hope to see?” The answer, most likely, is a monster, a brutish dolt with outward manifestations of evil. What we get instead, however, is the most alarming sight of all: A boy who looks like someone we might know. Ad Age / Media News Rolling Stone may take a hit at the newsstands over its cover story, but provocative covers often encourage single-copy sales at the same time as they spark anger.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Sun-Times Staff Laid Off | Spin Fires EIC | New Robin Roberts Gig?


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Chicago Sun-Times Lays Off Its Photo Staff (Chicago Tribune)
The Chicago Sun-Times has laid off its entire photography staff, and plans to use freelance photographers and reporters to shoot photos and video going forward, the newspaper said. A total of 28 full-time staffers received the news Thursday morning at a meeting held at the Sun-Times offices in Chicago, according to sources familiar with the situation. Crain’s Chicago Business The Chicago Newspaper Guild, the union that represents the photographers, immediately said it would consider taking action against the company over the cuts. It’s in negotiations on a new contract for the reporters, photographers and other workers it represents. Before the cuts, it had about 150 members at the company. Gawker A photojournalist is a photojournalist, even in times when he maybe shouldn’t be. Which is why when Sun-Times photographer Al Podgorski discovered Thursday morning that his entire department was being wiped out, the first thing he did was reach for his camera to capture the moment. National Press Photographers Association The layoffs included Chicago photojournalism icon and Pulitzer Prize-winner John H. White. Rob Hart, a Sun-Times Media photojournalist at the suburban Pioneer Press and an adjunct faculty member at the Medill School of Journalism, was in the room Thursday morning with the entire staff when they were told of the layoffs. “Being in the room with John White when we got laid off was a highlight of my career,” Hart told News Photographer magazine. MediaJobsDaily Apparently the 10th largest circulating newspaper in the country plans to rely on freelancers and reporters using their smartphones. Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Sun-Times Staff Laid Off | Spin Fires EIC | New Robin Roberts Gig?


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Chicago Sun-Times Lays Off Its Photo Staff (Chicago Tribune)
The Chicago Sun-Times has laid off its entire photography staff, and plans to use freelance photographers and reporters to shoot photos and video going forward, the newspaper said. A total of 28 full-time staffers received the news Thursday morning at a meeting held at the Sun-Times offices in Chicago, according to sources familiar with the situation. Crain’s Chicago Business The Chicago Newspaper Guild, the union that represents the photographers, immediately said it would consider taking action against the company over the cuts. It’s in negotiations on a new contract for the reporters, photographers and other workers it represents. Before the cuts, it had about 150 members at the company. Gawker A photojournalist is a photojournalist, even in times when he maybe shouldn’t be. Which is why when Sun-Times photographer Al Podgorski discovered Thursday morning that his entire department was being wiped out, the first thing he did was reach for his camera to capture the moment. National Press Photographers Association The layoffs included Chicago photojournalism icon and Pulitzer Prize-winner John H. White. Rob Hart, a Sun-Times Media photojournalist at the suburban Pioneer Press and an adjunct faculty member at the Medill School of Journalism, was in the room Thursday morning with the entire staff when they were told of the layoffs. “Being in the room with John White when we got laid off was a highlight of my career,” Hart told News Photographer magazine. MediaJobsDaily Apparently the 10th largest circulating newspaper in the country plans to rely on freelancers and reporters using their smartphones.

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