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Posts Tagged ‘Chloe Sevigny’

Chloe Sevigny Exits Greenwich Village

ShutterstockChloeSevignyA couple of fun media strands to note in Marlow Stern‘s solid Daily Beast Q&A with actress Chloe Sevigny, whose Amazon series The Cosmopolitans debuts August 28.

Shortly after departing SoHo restaurant Balthazar, where she had sat down last week for lunch with the reporter, Sevigny was snapped and her outfit turned into a Daily Mail summer item. Meanwhile, the woman whose personal New York scene was once celebrated in the pages of The New Yorker by Jay McInerney has made a decision on that front; one that some other media coverage didn’t quite prepare her for:

“[I moved to Brooklyn] two weeks ago. I just sold my apartment a year ago. After ten years of living in the East Village, I was on 10th St. between 2nd and 3rd, I was like, “Get me the fuck out of here.”

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Roman Coppola Vampire Spoof Checks Into Hollywood’s W Hotel

At the opposite end of Kickstarter and Indiegogo lie the independent short film realms of corporately co-sponsored contests and content. Ventures like “Four Stories,” an Intel-W Hotels initiative that came to a close last night in Westwood.

The global screenplay competition, curated by filmmaker Roman Coppola and (his) LA talent agency The Directors Bureau, asked back in August for submissions meeting two simple criteria. Plots had to anchored to a W Hotel and feature an Intel Ultrabook laptop as a central narrative component.

Last night at the Bruin Theatre, four winning filmed entries were screened, as chosen by Coppola, actor judges Chloe Sevigny, Michael Pitt, PJ Ransone and W Hotels global music director Michaelangelo L’acqua. There was also a fifth bonus entry from Coppola himself, vampire spoof Hollywood: Die Again, Undead One, starring Jason Schwartzman. That one was filmed across the street from The Pantages.

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LA Times Promotes Joy Press to Books and Culture Editor

Sixteen years after co-authoring The Sex Revolt: Gender, Rebellion, and Rock’N'Roll, cool LA journo couple Simon Reynolds and Joy Press are still going strong. He just had a piece in The Guardian about the explosive expansion of the U.S. electronic dance music scene, while she was promoted Wednesday to a choice new LA Times position.

Per the memo from editor Davan Maharaj and assistant managing editor Alice Short, Press has been tapped to replace Jon Thurber as the paper’s books and culture editor:

Joy has been Calendar’s pop culture and deputy television editor for two and a half years. During her tenure, she developed a Sunday TV page and played a major role in growing our successful Show Tracker blog, which doubled its readership and has become a key site for television news and series recaps…

In addition to her editing duties, Joy has written about some of the talked-about shows on TV, including Girls and Game of Thrones. She has profiled Chloe Sevigny, Mindy Kaling and Enlightened creator Mike White, and recently reported on the art activities that preceded the London Olympics.

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Vice Still Has Money to Burn, Thanks to Viacom

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Vice Magazine was once a staple of the New York late 90s/early millennial underground scene, featuring articles on shooting up heroin, interviews with up-and-comers Chloë Sevigny, and pics of naked people from Ryan McGinley. They also had the severely un-P.C. Do’s and Don’ts thanks to co-founder Gavin McInnes, who left the mag in 2007 when big corporate bought Vice away from its grime roots with VBS.TV (Vice‘s web station), and made it into a glossy product with lots of advertising.

And hey, that’s not entirely a bad thing. According to Page Six, Vice still has money to burn, thanks in no small part to the success of spin-off projects like their record label, clothing company, and naturally, VBS.

Now in a time when everyone is talking about frugality and cutbacks, the New York-based Vice headquarters is throwing a gigantic Halloween party in Brooklyn, which will either “be the final gentrification nail in the coffin of what was once Williamsburg, or it will just be an insane extravaganza of decadence and fun.” Which sort of sounds like two sides of the same bougie coin, and as far away from what Vice‘s original mission was as humanely possible. Expect tons of corporate sponsorship on everything from the beer (PBR?) to the costumes (Where the Wild Things Are?), and if not exactly reminiscent of the old Vice parties, than the old Si Newhouse-sponsored ones.

Related: So What Do You Do, Vice Editor-in-Chief Jesse Pearson?

American Film Market Unspools For 29th Time in Santa Monica

The American Film Market, which each year represents the diamonds and the dregs of the film business worldwide, opened its doors for a week at the Santa Monica Loews Beach Hotel on Wednesday with dozens of scurrying international sales reps, low-brow producers and a few dozen media.walken.jpg

The studios usually steer clear of AFM week, leaving it to what some have termed the subcutaneous elements of the film business to ravage about for deals.

This year, market honchos were loving the outlook for the market.

“It should be a great market,” said one buyer, who didn’t want to be named. “There are dozens of great films here this week. How about that phenomenal Walken film?”

The unknown buyer was referring to “The Maiden Heist,” which premieres in Santa Monica starring (Christopher) Walken, Morgan Freeman and William H. Macy and produced by Bob Yari’s The Yari Film Group.

Other premieres expected this week include “The Killing Room” with Tim Hutton, Chloe Sevigny, Nick Cannon and Peter Stormare; and “Powder Blue,” starring Forest Whitaker, Jessica Biel, Kris Kristofferson, Ray Liotta and Patrick Swayze.

More than 500 other films, including 102 world premieres and 375 market premieres will be screened during the market, which stretches to Nov. 12.

Vice Books Launches

deardiary_cover.jpgHaving successfully launched a record label and published a series of wildly popular guidebooks, the impossibly-irreverent Vice magazine is launching a full-on book division.

Two titles — Lesley Arfin‘s Dear Diary (a Go Ask Alice for the post-Kids generation) and Chris Nieratko‘s faux-porn reviews, Skinema — are both due in June.

Speaking of Kids, Chloe Sevigny contributes the foreword for Dear Diary; Johnny Knoxville (could this be considered the post-Jackass already?) provides the foreword for Skinema.

LA Times IMAGE Section Debut

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The newest LA Times section, Image, debuted today, and it’s a welcome addition to the other features, once the truly dreadful printing problems are fixed. (The photos in our home-delivery edition weren’t just blurry, they were surreally blurry. We actually thought it was a stylistic choice for about 15 seconds.)

Chloe Sevigny is profiled, and while there’s nothing much new about her clothes-horse qualities, Rose Apodaca makes it interesting. But an Inside the Closet sidebar needs photos of exactly what’s inside–which ankle boots, please.

David Keeps finds a new trend in men’s fashion, and takes a couple of hundred words to describe steampunk. Allegedly this combo of Victorian and hooligan pops up on Deadwood, the cancelled HBO series.

Just in time for summer in Southern California, Amy Scattergood has a how-to piece about that cutting edge trend, knitting. Next fall’s fashions might feature chunky scarves and sweaters, but a beach wear story might have been more helpful–the last line of the story suggests the look might be outdated by the time a knitter finishes a project.

There are a number of other sort of ho-hum pieces, including a really dense story on the science of skin creams that never came out and said which ones are worth the money.

Adam Tschorn, who’s married to fashion critic Booth Moore, wrote some of the liveliest pieces: one on Justin Timberlake’s stylist and a step-by step guide to growing a mustache. Both were fun to read–too bad Moore’s story about fashion gossip was so stale.

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is off to a good start. If the Times editors can resist using the same old pool of predictable writers and done-to-death ideas (no stories on couture for kids or little dogs, please), reading about fashion might be as much fun as shopping.