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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Anderson’

Scott Dadich Named EIC of Wired

Scott Dadich has been named the new editor-in-chief of Wired. This marks a return to Wired for Dadich, who served as the magazine’s creative director from 2006 to 2010. During his time there Wired won three straight NMA’s for Design. Dadich most recently served as Condé Nast’s vice president of editorial platforms.

“Scott has been at the forefront of the company’s digital innovation for the past three years, developing the design for a digital magazine that has become an industry standard,” said Condé’s editorial director, Tom Wallace, in a statement. “His return to Wired, where he served as creative director and won three National Magazine Awards for Design, will ensure that it continues its pace-setting growth.”

“I’m excited to return to Wired, which has had such a tremendous impact on my life and my career,” Dadich said, in a statement. “I’m honored to have the chance to build on the legacy of innovation that Louis and Jane started some 20 years ago. And I am grateful to my friend and colleague Chris and the incredible Wired staff. I look forward to finding new opportunities to delight and surprise the Wired community, both with the stories we tell and in the ways in which we tell them.”

Dadich succeeds Chris Anderson, who left to dedicate more time to his robotics company.

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Wired Magazine and TED Come to Long Beach

Wired magazine was in town last week, hosting a tech-centric TED gathering in Long Beach last Thursday at the 555 East American Steakhouse. Most of the Wired bigwigs, including publisher Howard Mittman, EIC Chris Anderson, and super-awesome contributing editor Clive Thompson (pictured above on the left with Conde Nast‘s Scott Dadich; NBC Universal International’s Roma Khanna; and Wired managing editor Jacob Young) were there. The Daily Show‘s Jon Hodgman and Boing Boing‘s Mark Frauenfelder also made appearances, among others. No video, unfortunately. But we do have plenty of glamor shots!

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Chris Anderson Discusses Wired

Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief at Wired, talked to Columbia journalism students yesterday about his publication and the future of the Internet. He said Wired would be getting subscriptions for its iPad edition, but couldn’t say when or how it would work.

He also mentioned that the covers of Wired sometimes don’t tell the real story, and are merely meant to grab the attention of consumers. “We put things on the covers that sell, and sometimes its relationship to the interior is not 100 percent.” Not shocking news, of course.

The best part of the talk might have been when he boasted about parent Condé Nast, saying, “We had our best year in history last year.”

Hmmm… Something about that comment doesn’t seem 100 percent accurate.

Tracy Morgan On Letterman| McClatchy Bucks The Trend | Bayh-be, Bayh-be Not | Teaching Old Media Dogs New Tricks | Wired Vs Weird

Huffington Post: Tracy Morgan continues to battle Joaquin Phoenix for craziest talk show guest in history award.

Editor & Publisher: McClatchy is expanding its Sunday Select program so more non-subscribers can read its newspapers for free.

New York Observer: Condé Nast, MTV rebrands. A sign of the times?

TVNewser: What should be Evan Bayh‘s next career move? Voe here.

FishbowlLA: Sarah Silverman versus Wired‘s TED conference organizer Chris Anderson in a Twitter flame war? Lets all meet behind the school after math class and watch them fight!

Joanne Lipman: A New Prototype of Feminism in Journalism?

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One year ago, Portfolio was on its last legs. After the market saw the biggest plummet in decades, the cover of the business magazine had American Apparel founder Dov Charney on the cover: A misstep for the magazines that some say it never recovered from. The waiting game of Portfolio‘s cut from the Conde Nast empire wasn’t long, and many blamed editor-in-chief Joanne Lipman for the bad turns the title had taken.

Six months later, Lipman is back, in a New York Times weekend editorial, talking about feminism and inequality in the workplace, which some groups have read as her bitter grapes towards Si Newhouse for killing off Portfolio. But her argument is more than just sarcasm towards a former boss: If you don’t think there are still issues of gender divided in the newsroom bullpen, then maybe you should go back and read some Nan Robertson.

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Wired Editor Chris Anderson Squares Off Against Macmillan CEO John Sargent on Free and Paid Content

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Photo: (left to right) Chris Anderson, Gary Hoenig, John Sargent, Alan Murray

Last night’s discussion, Free AND Paid Content: Business Models That Work, hinged on whether consumers of news and books should and will pay for content online. But it became a tense intellectual slugging match between John Sargent, CEO of Macmillan Publishing, and moderator Chris Anderson, most recently the author of “Free: The Future of a Radical Price.”

“We have not grown up in an atmosphere of free books” — Sargent

Anderson contended that free digital copies could bring books back into the “cultural conversation,” while Sargent held steady as the consistent voice of dissent, expressing a grim forecast for the publishing industry and noting that it’s “hard to imagine books as a growth business.” Not even “freemiums” will work, Sargent said, warning of the “danger of the experimental stage,” in which giving away free books may increase sales the first year and even the second, only to see them disappear completely long-term. “It’s early,” he said. “We need a device or two and we definitely need a new screen.”

Anderson and Sargent were joined by panelists Gary Hoenig, ESPN Publishing’s general manager and editorial director, and Alan Murray, deputy managing editor and executive online editor of the Wall Street Journal, each of whom provided moderate voices amid Anderson’s proselytizing and Sargent’s foreboding.

Anderson moderated the panel hosted in the Condé Nast building where he works as editor-in-chief of Wired. As the group’s ostensible mediator, he served more as an antagonist to the three panelists, especially Sargent, highlighting the fact that all are generals in a war that seeks to have readers pay for a product that, in many cases, they can get for free.

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It’s Adland On The Menu: Author James P. Othmer Talks Advertising & Media Headlines

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Today on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven were joined by James P. Othmer, author of “ADLAND: Searching for the Meaning of Life on a Branded Planet,” to discuss the day’s big media headlines.

Today’s podcast became a lengthy discussion about charging for media content versus giving it away for free, and the power of writing for free as a blogger.

Barry Diller, Chris Anderson and Malcolm Gladwell should be thrown into a cage match,” Othmer said. “And the winner can get to determine the economic model for all media content for the next 100 years.”

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

CNN May Be Sued Over MJ Footage|Jackson Family Hires Power Publicists|CBS Snags Gawker’s Lawson|Layoffs At Spin|This Week’s Best Media Throwdowns

Embedded video from CNN Video

TVNewser: CNN has warned staffers that it may become subject to lawsuits alleging unauthorized use of Michael Jackson footage over the past few days. Those responsible for the broadcast of the footage in question “may feel the financial effect in year-end bonuses,” the network told staffers in an email.

PRNewser: Meanwhile, the Jackson family has hired publicists to the stars Ken Sunshine and Shawn Sachs and announced that there will be no viewing — public or private — of the pop star at his former home Neverland. A public memorial is in the works.

Silicon Alley Insider: CBS has poached Gawker‘s star television recapper Richard Lawson to write for TV.com.

Gawker: There are rumors that Spin magazine has cut 20 percent of its staff. Not a good week for music magazines.

Daily Intel: A run-down of the week’s best Web feuds featuring Rolling Stone writer Matt Taibbi vs. Goldman Sachs, CNBC‘s Dennis Kneale taking on the blogosphere (will they ever learn?), Chris Anderson and Malcolm Gladwell throwing down over “Free” and author Alice Hoffman and her critic Roberta Silman.

FishbowlNY Editor Amanda Ernst Visits The Menu

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Today on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu, host Jason Boog of GalleyCat was joined by FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst and author and blogger Alex Irvine.

Amanda talked about the news that Wired editor Chris Anderson pulled passages from other sources like Wikipedia and included them, unattributed, in his new book “Free,” as well as the Virginia Quarterly Review blogger who discovered the plagiarism.

Also discussed: Michael Jackson‘s death and the subsequent media coverage, a Jackson-related scene from the upcoming Sascha Baron Cohen movie “Bruno” that is now of questionable taste, how book reviews are becoming less available to authors as a source of promotion for their books and Alex’s upcoming projects.

How VQR‘s Jaquith Found Anderson’s Plagiarism (Hint: It’s In Parentheses)

free.pngVirginia Quarterly Review blogger Waldo Jaquith made quite a stir with his discovery that portions of Wired editor Chris Anderson‘s new book “Free” were pulled from unattributed sources, namely Wikipedia. But we wondered, how did Jaquith happen upon Anderson’s plagiarized sections?

We tracked down Jaquith — as he was en route to a vacation in Virginia Beach — and asked him how he made the connection between “Free” and Wikipedia.

For Jaquith, it all started with a parenthetical. During the passage from “Free” in which Anderson describes the saying “There’s no such thing as a free lunch,” Jaquith noticed that something was amiss. “It mentioned Crescent City and then, parenthetically, said New Orleans,” he said. “At first, I was thrown off. I thought that maybe that before it was called New Orleans it was called Crescent City and I was mad at myself for not knowing that.”

The reference needled at Jaquith so he did some research. His first stop: Wikipedia. To his surprise, the Wikipedia entry for New Orleans only mentioned Crescent City as a nickname. So he Googled the citation just as Anderson had written it in his book. That’s how he found an entry for explaining free lunch on Wikipedia.

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