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Posts Tagged ‘Christiane Amanpour’

Forbes Ranks The World’s 100 Most Powerful Women

Even though lists like Forbes’ 100 Most Powerful Women are essentially meaningless, the people included are usually worth noting, so they do serve a little purpose. This latest ranking from Forbes does a good job of picking women with real influence and bringing attention to those that don’t get enough credit.

Take the most powerful woman: Angela Merkel (right), the Chancellor of Germany. Her name might not ring a bell, but it should. There are a few more slightly obscure names in the list and some fairly obvious ones as well (Hillary Clinton checks in at number two).

We know — you want to hear who was the highest ranking New York media woman. We’ll give you one guess. If you’re thinking Sally Jessy Raphael, you’re creative, but wrong. It’s Jill Abramson, the new Executive Editor at The New York Times. She ranks eighth on the list.

Check out a few notable media names from the Most Powerful Women list after the jump.

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Former Longtime WNBC Anchor Carol Jenkins Says TV News Industry Going ‘Right Direction’ for Women, Blacks

Carol Jenkins was a top-notch broadcast journalist for several decades in New York. She is most remembered for her nearly quarter-century at WNBC as an anchor and reporter.

Since leaving the business a decade ago, Jenkins wrote a book and started formulating a second one.

“I thought I was going to have this grand producing career,” Jenkins admits. “My timing wasn’t [good]. I started trying to do documentaries just as reality television [took off].”

But her pet project was being a founding president of the Women’s Media Center.

Always an advocate for more women in newsrooms, Jenkins had the perfect forum for her cause.

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The Four New York Times Journalists Captured in Libya Have Been Released

Six days after being captured in Libya, the four missing New York Times journalists have been released. The journalists — Lynsey Addario, Anthony Shadid, Stephen Farrell, and Tyler Hicks — were released into the custody of Turkish diplomats Monday morning.

The first piece of good news surrounding the missing journalists came on March 17, when Saif Qaddafi told Christiane Amanpour on Nightline that the four journalists would be freed.

News of the actual release broke Monday morning over (how else?) Twitter, when Namik Tan, Turkey’s ambassador to the United States, tweeted that “the 4 @nytimes journalists are on their way to leave Libyan border and will be delivered to US officials.”

A Times spokesperson gave the following statement to Yahoo’s Cutline:

We are grateful that our journalists have been released, and we are working to reunite them with their families. We have been told they are in good health and are in the process of confirming that. We thank the Turkish, British, and U.S. governments for their assistance in the release. We also appreciate the efforts of those in the Libyan government who helped secure the release this morning.

New York Times Journalists to be Freed

Here’s some good news about a bad situation: Last night on Nightline, Christiane Amanpour spoke with Saif Qaddafi, who stated that the four New York Times journalists who went missing Tuesday, would be freed at some point today. Qaddafi, the son of Libyan leader Moammar Qaddafi, told Amanpour:

You know, they entered country illegally and when the army, when they liberated the city of Ajdabiyah from the terrorists and they found her there and they arrest her because you know foreigners in this place. But then they were happy because they found out she is American, not European. And thanks to that she will be free tomorrow.

No word on why he singled out photographer Lynsey Addario, but according to the Times, all four journalists were able to call home late last night, and the Libyan government has assured them that they will all be released.

Settle Down Internet | Covered | Great Journalism

The Daily Beast/Newsweek Brings Aboard Kathy O’Hearn As VP

Our friends over at WebNewser report that Kathy O’Hearn is ditching TV news for the VP role at the newly formed Newsweek Daily Beast company.  O’Hearn most recently worked at CNN where, among other roles, she was executive producer of both Campbell Brown’s and Christiane Amanpour’s shows.

O’Hearn also served as executive producer of This Week before leaving in 2008 to manage ABC’s special event politics coverage.

Forbes World’s 100 Most Powerful Women List Loaded With Media Figures

Last evening, Forbes released their annual ranking of the World’s 100 Most Powerful Women on their official website, Forbes.com.  The list included 18 media and publishing personalities and made it clear that the women controlling the industry have no shortage of creativity, wealth, and executive power.  Take a look at the major players that Forbes recognized this year:

Oprah Winfrey, talk show host and media mogul, #3
Arianna Huffington, editor and co-Founder, Huffington Post, #28
Anna Wintour, editor-in-chief, Vogue, #56
Tina Brown, The Daily Beast, #34
Cathleen Black, chair, Hearst Magazines, #67
Janet Robinson, CEO, The New York Times, #85
Nikki Finke, founder, Deadline Hollywood Daily, #79
Suze Orman, author, CNBC host, #61
Rachael Ray, talk show host and author, #78
Meredith Viera, co-anchor, The Today Show, #40
Ellen DeGeneres, talk show host,  #10
Christiane Amanpour, news anchor, ABC’s This Week, #73
Anne Sweeney, co-chair, Disney Media Networks; President,Disney/ABC TV Group #69
Katie Couric, anchor, CBS Evening News, #22
Diane Sawyer, news anchor, ABC’s World News, #46
Sarah Palin, television commentator, Fox News, #16
Rachel Maddow,  anchor, The Rachel Maddow Show, #50
Martha Stewart, talk show host, author, #99

The full list can be viewed in the Forbes October 25 issue, on newsstands today. 

Amanpour Interviews Tina Brown, Harold Evans|WSJ Covers Tiger Woods Scandal, After Keith Kelly|Hearst To Launch New Site Next Year|E&P Still Has A Chance|HuffPost Profiled

CNN: Watch The Daily Beast‘s Tina Brown and her husband, Sir Harold Evans, this Sunday on Christiane Amanpour‘s CNN show.

Wall Street Journal: Media scandal of the day: The Wall Street Journal published a story today about Tiger Woods‘ shady deal with Men’s Fitness publisher American Media Inc. without giving any credit to New York Post columnist Keith Kelly, who broke the story two weeks ago.

WWD: Hearst MagazinesChuck Cordray promises a new digital vertical to launch next year “is not one you’d expect from us.” Also, Hearst is planning to relaunch its teen network over the summer.

Huffington Post: Editor & Publisher editor Greg Mitchell blogs about the demise of his magazine, and says there is a “decent chance” that it will be resurrected.

Los Angeles Times: James Rainey profiles The Huffington Post and the challenge of making money on the Web.

Christiane Amanpour|THR, Variety Plan Changes|GalleyCat Correctly Predicts Oprah’s Book Club Selection|WSJ Reveals Pricey Mobile App Pay Structure|Diller Will Use Cash To Reinvest

TVNewser: CNN correspondent Christiane Amanpour celebrated the launch of her new show “Amanpour” at Michael’s yesterday, and chatted with Kevin Allocca. Says Kevin: “After the interview, Amanpour remarked, ‘That’s the tiniest lens I’ve every looked into.’”

FishbowlLA/Folio: Nikki Finke reports that The Hollywood Reporter will be going online only next year, while another entertainment trade Variety will be erecting pay walls. But Folio reports that THR owner Nielsen Business Media says it has no plans to shut down the trade pub’s print edition.

GalleyCat: Back in August, GalleyCat senior editor Ron Hogan correctly predicted that Oprah Winfrey‘s next book club selection would be Say You’re One of Them by Uwem Akpan. The Washington Post made it official this afternoon, citing unintentionally leaked info. Winfrey is set to announce her book club choice during her show tomorrow.

Ad Age: The Wall Street Journal has announced plans to start charging for its mobile app available on iPhones and Blackberrys, and the cost is surprisingly high. Readers that don’t subscribe to the WSJ either in print or online will have to pay $2 per week for the app — or $104 a year. Subscribers to either medium will only be charged $1 a year and those who subscribe to both will get mobile access for free.

Bloomberg: IAC CEO Barry Diller says he will use his cash to repurchase stock, not invest in other companies like NBC Universal.

Sanford Fesses Up|Doppelt, Brown Together Again|New York Mag Digs Up Info On Rohde Kidnapping|If Amanpour Is Ever Kidnapped, She Wants It Publicized|Why Does The Public Hate The Media?

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

TVNewser: The strangest mea culpa press conference ever: Gov. Mark Sanford admits to affair.

FishbowlLA: W‘s Gabe Doppelt is moving to Tina Brown‘s The Daily Beast‘s LA bureau. This is the first time Doppelt and Brown have worked together — Doppelt started her career as Brown’s assistant at Tatler and also worked as an editor at large at Brown’s Talk magazine.

New York Magazine: We were blown away by the in-depth reporting that went into Matthew Cole‘s account of New York Times reporter David Rohde‘s kidnapping and the measures taken to try to get him out.

wowOwow: “60 Minutes” contributor Lesley Stahl interviewed CNN‘s Christiane Amanpour about foreign reporting and the crisis in Iran. “If I’m kidnapped I want you, personally, to lead the charge and make sure people know about it,” Amanpour told Stahl, in response to the David Rohde kidnapping.

Vanity Fair: Matt Pressman examines why the public hates the media

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