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Posts Tagged ‘Ciro Scotti’

Reuters Trio Rewarded with Choice New Assignments

TiffanyWuHeadshotReuters Americas desk editor and deputy regional editor Ciro Scotti is moving on to a position as-yet to be announced. Replacing him is a veteran reporter who has been with the wire service since 1998.

From today’s memo by Reuters Americas editor Dayan Candappa:

Tiffany Wu has done many of the key jobs at Reuters – reporter, bureau chief, top news editor and regional specialist editor who had responsibility for the companies desking team – giving her a rounded view of the editing desk’s pivotal role.

Tiffany moved to New York eight years ago as our tech, media and telecoms editor, and was promoted to run Company News in the Americas in 2010. She joined the Top News Team in September 2012 and has helped guide our coverage of a wide range of front page stories, from cyber attacks and the fallout from the Edward Snowden leaks to big corporate shake-ups and the Quebec train derailment disaster.

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BusinessWeek’s New Hires Include New York Magazine Steal

zooooom.jpgSo the exciting news today is the new Bloomberg LP-owned BusinessWeek, which laid off so many back in October, now officially includes some big-name new hires, the biggest of which may be Hugo Lindgren as executive editor.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek‘s steal of New York magazine’s editorial director is surprising, as Lindgren was Adam Moss‘ right hand man. He’ll begin his new role on March 8.

Also on the Josh Tyrangiel-assembled dream team is Eric Pooley, formerly managing editor of Fortune, who will be taking on the position of deputy editor at Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Ellen Pollock and Ciro Scotti remain the two holdovers from the original magazine to round out the top editorial roster.

Of the staffing announcements made today, Slate‘s James Ledbetter said, “It’s a little like the reuniting of a rock supergroup,” but adds, “it’s not necessarily what the publication truly needs.”

Can’t hurt the image though, after the beating the business magazine took when top editors like John Byrne and Stephen Adler, and president Keith Fox, dropped out of BW once Bloomberg bought it.

Read More: The BusinessWeek Supergroup –Slate

BW names exec editor, deputy editor in first move by new chief — Talking Biz News

Previously: John Byrne BusinessWeek Departure Rumors Turn True, More Employees Fleeing BusinessWeek?

Bloomberg Starts To Put Together BusinessWeek Staff

businessweek_3.pngToday’s New York Times “Media Decoder” blog post about the restructuring of BusinessWeek post-Bloomberg LP‘s acquisition has a funny ring to it. We already know that editor Stephen Adler is stepping down, as well as president Keith Fox. So who will be manning the new magazine?

Apparently, the people who decided to stick around. But, unless you’re reading carefully, you’d never know it. The Times mentions Bloomberg “has selected a few staff members to make the leap to Bloomberg BusinessWeek,” but you can’t tell right away if those staffers are from the magazine or Bloomberg. Except if you are intimately familiar with the BusinessWeek masthead.

The “new” magazine editors — Ellen Pollock, John Byrne, and Ciro Scotti — are actually just continuing in their former positions. (Mainly, it seems like the story is just there to address rumors of Pollock and Byrne’s departures.) Jessica Sibley, who came in to help the ailing magazine in the role of senior vice president and worldwide publisher back in February of 2008 will be the new magazine’s publisher as Fox stays behind at McGraw-Hill. The Times post is titled “Bloomberg Builds a Staff For BusinessWeek” but it should really be “Bloomberg Announces Who’s Decided Not To Leave.”

Someone who is leaving — Roger Neal, the current general manager of BusinessWeek.com. His staff will now report to Bloomberg’s Kevin Krim.

Also of note: All BusinessWeek employees will be moving to Bloomberg headquarters on December 4, unless they already work in New York, in which case they can stay at their former offices until the Bloomberg building has room for them.

Memo to BusinessWeek staffers after the jump.

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Bloomberg “Most Aggressive” Bidder For BusinessWeek

businessweek cover.jpgAlthough BusinessWeek‘s media columnist Jon Fine has already departed for his six-month sabbatical, his publication is still closely tracking its own sale.

Bids for the business magazine were due yesterday to BusinessWeek‘s owner McGraw-Hill, and at least four parties have submitted revised bids, according to Tom Lowry, who has taken over Fine’s “On Media” column:

“Among those submitting revised bids were financial data giant Bloomberg LP, private equity firm Open Gate Capital, and investment firm ZelnickMedia LLC. At least one other bidder, which BusinessWeek was not able to identify, also submitted a bid.”

Although details of the bids are unknown, Lowry said Bloomberg has been “the most aggressive in its pursuit of BusinessWeek.” According to Lowry, Bloomberg’s chief content officer Norm Pearlstine met with various members of the BusinessWeek editorial team last week, including editor-in-chief Stephen Adler, executive editors Ellen Pollock and John Byrne and Ciro Scotti, BusinessWeek‘s managing editor. These meetings discussed topics like the possibility of integrating content from Bloomberg into the magazine and adding more editorial pages to the book, which “suggests Bloomberg might be looking at tinkering with BusinessWeek‘s traditional 60-40 mix of editorial pages to ad pages,” Lowry said.

Right now, it’s all speculation. The sales process is just at the beginning, but we’re bound to learn more as it progresses. But a successful media company like Bloomberg taking over the reins of a struggling pub like BusinessWeek certainly seems promising, even if the editorial mix of the mag may change in the future. If BusinessWeek survives in any form, and jobs are saved, it’s better than the fate suffered by other magazines, like Portfolio.

BusinessWeek Accepts Revised Bids From Potential BuyersBusinessWeek

Earlier: Getting The Skinny On The BusinessWeek Deal As Bid Deadline Looms