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Posts Tagged ‘Clive Goodman’

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The New York Times Replaces Abramson as Executive Editor (NYT)
Jill Abramson has been dismissed as executive editor of The New York Times and is being replaced by Dean Baquet, the managing editor, an abrupt change in leadership at one of the nation’s largest daily newspapers. FishbowlDC Abramson served as executive editor since 2011 and was the first woman in the role. According to the Times‘ coverage of the announcement, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the publisher of the paper and the chairman of The New York Times Company, told a stunned newsroom that had been quickly assembled that he had made the decision because of “an issue with management in the newsroom.” Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Despite significant achievements, Abramson’s tenure was marred by tension with Sulzberger and disagreements with Times Co CEO Mark Thompson, who took an unprecedentedly hands-on approach to managing the paper’s editorial resources. Abramson also suffered from perceptions among staff that she was condescending and combative. Mashable Abramson previously served as the Times‘ Washington bureau chief and managing editor before taking the executive editor role. People with knowledge of the Times newsroom said some staffers questioned how much Abramson enjoyed running the paper. She was sometimes conspicuously absent from the newsroom; one notable occasion was the day after Hurricane Sandy slammed into the New York region. New York Post / AP Baquet, 57, who is the first African-American to hold the newspaper’s highest editorial position, received a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting in 1988. Baquet originally joined the Times in 1990 as a reporter and held positions including deputy metropolitan editor and national editor. He left the paper for the LA Times in 2000, where he served as managing editor and then editor. Baquet rejoined the Times in 2007 and was Washington bureau chief before becoming the managing editor for news in Sept. 2011. FishbowlNY Former FishbowlNY editor Dylan Stableford was prophetic when he covered a breakfast event in 2008 and wrote: “Dean Baquet looked an awful lot like the next executive editor of The New York Times.” The New Yorker / Currency As with any such upheaval, there’s a history behind it. Several weeks ago, I’m told, Abramson discovered that her pay and her pension benefits as both executive editor and, before that, as managing editor were considerably less than the pay and pension benefits of Bill Keller, the male editor whom she replaced in both jobs. “She confronted the top brass,” one close associate said, and this may have fed into the management’s narrative that she was “pushy,” a characterization that, for many, has an inescapably gendered aspect.

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News of The World Letter Casts Additional Shadows on Scandal

An explosive letter written by former News of The World correspondent Clive Goodman in 2007 is going to make things a lot more difficult for News International and News Corporation. In the letter, Goodman – who was fired from News of The World for hacking and then served four months in prison – complains about his dismissal to the paper’s human resources department.

But it’s not the typical complaints: Goodman claims that he shouldn’t have been fired because he only conducted phone hacking “with the full knowledge and support” of several senior News of The World editors, and that payoffs to private investigators were arraigned by senior officials as well. The Guardian reports that these allegations carry a lot of weight:

The letters from Goodman and from the London law firm Harbottle & Lewis are among a cache of paperwork published by the Commons culture, media and sport select committee. One committee member, the Labour MP Tom Watson, said Goodman’s letter was ‘absolutely devastating.’ He said: ‘Clive Goodman’s letter is the most significant piece of evidence that has been revealed so far. It completely removes News International’s defence. This is one of the largest cover-ups I have seen in my lifetime.’

If Goodman’s claims are true it’s going to lead to much more trouble for a company that is desperately trying to silence this scandal. It seems that the longer it goes on, the louder everything gets.

Cell Phone Hacking Allegations Against Murdoch’s British Papers Get Investigated

news of the world.pngYesterday, U.K. newspaper The Guardian published a story revealing that Rupert Murdoch‘s British newspaper subsidiary News Group News­papers had paid more than £1 million ($1.4 million) to settle claims that its reporters had illegally hacked into the cell phones of government officials and celebrities.

The allegations set off a firestorm of controversy in the U.K., with Scotland Yard launching an inquiry into the claims.

According to the Guardian the payments were made to Gordon Taylor, CEO the Professional Footballers’ Association, who sued News Group after a private investigator who worked for the company, Glenn Mulcaire, was jailed and admitted to hacking into phones of various targets, including Gordon and model Elle MacPherson. Another News Group staffer, Clive Goodman, a reporter for Murdoch owned News of the World was also jailed for hacking.

Although News Group denied any knowledge of its employees’ actions, Gordon still sued claiming the company did know what was up. His suit led to a £700,000 pay-out, which the Guardian claimed included more than £400,000 in damages. Two other football figures also sued the media company, resulting in the additional £300,000 in payments. All of the settlements included clauses preventing the parties from discussing the case, and Taylor’s case was sealed by the court, the Guardian added.

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