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Posts Tagged ‘CNBC’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Silver Dishes on NYT Exit | Bartiromo Bolting CNBC? | NY Post Ailing?


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Nate Silver Went Against The Grain for Some at The Times (NYT / Public Editor’s Journal)
I don’t think Nate Silver ever really fit into the Times culture and I think he was aware of that. He was, in a word, disruptive. Much like the Brad Pitt character in the movie Moneyball disrupted the old model of how to scout baseball players, Nate disrupted the traditional model of how to cover politics. A number of traditional and well-respected Times journalists disliked his work. The first time I wrote about him I suggested that print readers should have the same access to his writing that online readers were getting. I was surprised to quickly hear by email from three high-profile Times political journalists, criticizing him and his work. They were also tough on me for seeming to endorse what he wrote, since I was suggesting that it get more visibility. FishbowlNY This is all understandable. Old people don’t like change, and writers have egos. And maybe Silver acted a bit too above everyone else and that earned him some pages in the Times’ burn book. HuffPost / The Backstory On Monday afternoon, this reporter asked Silver about the Times public editor’s column, whether he felt constrained by the Times newsroom culture, and if he had enough support from colleagues. “I had plenty of support, I felt, from [executive editor Jill Abramson] and from other key people at the Times,” Silver said. “I don’t really want to dwell too much to my relationships there. It was not — I would say, I love the people at ESPN.” Silver added that any cultural issue was “not a big factor” in his decision. NY Mag / Daily Intelligencer “I’m interested in running a website, building out a business here, and having my opportunity to weigh in on different topics,” Silver said, responding to Times public editor Margaret Sullivan’s comments. “I’m not interested in who I’m getting a beer with. I have plenty of people in my social circles for that.” TheWrap / MediaAlley In a conference call with the press, ESPN president John Skipper said FiveThirtyEight will be similar to Bill Simmons’ Grantland, which is also owned by ESPN. The FiveThirtyEight name and URL were purchased for an undisclosed amount. Previously, Silver owned those rights and licensed them to The New York Times for a three-year contract. Its deal with Silver is a “long-term, multi-year deal.” TVNewser Put another way: If Silver leaves ESPN in a few years, FiveThirtyEight will not be going with him, but rather staying with ESPN and ABC. paidContent Silver stressed that “we’re not pulling back from politics. We’ll probably hire at least one more person to cover politics fulltime” and said that the new site’s only guaranteed coverage areas will be sports, politics and some economics. As for other topics, “if we find the right person, we might hire in that vertical… We’re looking for people who can think, do math and write. Those skills don’t always overlap, so it’s going to be an intense search process for us.” TVNewser Silver’s migration from the Times to ESPN represents more than a new URL — it augurs a sea change in the news business itself, experts say.

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Veteran of Bloomberg Radio and CNBC, Jim Kingsland Dies at 49

Jim Kingsland had business news in his blood. He worked for every major financial media company, including Bloomberg LP, from 1992 to 2006. Kingsland died this week at age 49 after a long illness.

He had severe diabetes, which led to a liver transplant several years ago. His eyesight was poor and his pancreas was compromised.

At Bloomberg for much of the time, he was news director at WBBR.

Wes Richards was host of Bloomberg on the Weekends.

“He had the right stuff, he did the right thing,” Richards tells FishbowlNY. “He was a pleasure to work for and work with and an island of calm and rationality in a sea of chaos.”

Kingsland bookended Bloomberg with FNN/CNBC and Fox Business Network from 2007 to 2010 as assignment editor.

The business journalist also had a passion for numismatics–the study of currency–founding JK Numismatics in November 2006, according to his LinkedIn page.

Kingsland worked at a pair of small suburban stations early in his career. He also was a 1010 WINS traffic reporter via Shadow Traffic in the mid 1980s.

Jim is survived by his wife, Melissa, and three children, Rachel, Benjamin, and Nathan.

Photo credit: www.coinnews.net

Barbara Walters, Joe Kernen and One Republican’s Response to the Debate

1003_mockup.gifAfter last week’s head-spinning scene where real-life democrats took campaign advice from fictional politicians (Chris Noth, you’ve got my vote), I thought I’d pretty much covered the landscape of presidential politics among the Wednesday Michael’s crowd. Nothing doing. Before I could settle in for my lunch with PR maven Leslie Stevens and cosmetics entrepreneur Patti Pao, CNBC’s Joe Kernen called me over to meet Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin who was on the air with Joe earlier today deconstructing last night’s debates (We suggest a whip and a chair for the moderator of next week’s match-up) and is scheduled to appear on Sean Hannity‘s broadcast on Fox this evening.

The guys told me they were looking for “equal time,” since last week’s column was all about the democratic point of view. I’m always happy to chat with Joe whose fabulously smart 12-year-old daughter, Blake Kernen is one of my favorite young writers.  Not surprisingly, Senator Johnson told me he thought Mitt Romney won the debate hands down. “He shattered the caricature (the Obama campaign) has been pushing. It’s hard to paint that picture when (Romney) came out so strong and showed such a command of the issues. He  offered the specifics that Obama did not. Last night did nothing to stop the momentum (Romney) has been gathering.” He also called out the president for being “purposely misleading” on Libya.  While the senator admitted the president was “a little more energetic” he concluded, “He’s got nothing.”

Senator Johnson, who predicts it’s going to be a ”close election,” says Vice President Joe Biden‘s “rude” performance during his debate with Representative Paul Ryan had a lingering negative effect on the president’s favorable ratings and pointed to CNN’s recent poll which showed most viewers gave last night’s segment on the economy to Romney as an indication that the republican challenger is winning on the issue voters care most about. “In both debates, Romney showed that he can work with the other side. Americans have to ask themselves, ‘Do we want four more years of gridlock and a president who doesn’t know how to lead?”

Leslie Stevens, David Patrick Columbia, Patti Pao and Diane Clehane

Things lightened up considerably when I joined Leslie and Patti at our table to talk about the launch of Patti’s new skincare line Restorsea, which debuted at Bergdorf Goodman on Monday. Smart, savvy and absolutely passionate about skincare, Patti has built an impressive track record in the beauty business with stints at Avon and Elizabeth Arden. The Harvard Business School graduate introduced glycolic acid to the beauty industry and made Avon’s Anew the industry standard that is today.

She has continued to search out the latest innovations for the luxury market in her own consulting firm Pao Principle which she launched in 2005. Utilizing her deep ties to China, Patti created a survey asking 353 billionaires in the country (yes, you read that right) questions relating to handbags and fine jewelry. Doing so created a much sought after database when the survey findings made The New York Times, Women’s Wear Daily, Forbes and Fortune. That stroke of marketing genius branded her LVMH’s luxury expert, and she picked up three clients in Norway which turned out to be a fateful turn of events.

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Report: Local Newscasts Outpace Cable Networks in New York

Viewers would rather get their news from local anchors in New York than the cable news networks, a report by trade association TVB indicates.

The report says New York’s early and late evening newscasts combined to outdraw the five highest-rated cable networks by 18 percent.

The data is conclusive in highlighting the enormous audience reach and composition balance advantages local broadcast TV news provides advertisers compared [to] national cable primetime news networks,” TVB president Steve Lanzano told Broadcasting & Cable.

The report, which examined Nielsen figures of nightly programming on CNN, Fox News Channel, CNBC, MSNBC, and HLN, says those networks contribute to only three to eight percent of the total evening news audience.

Haines: Year Later | Yahoo Redesign | Long Form Tweets

TVNewser: Hard to believe 365 days have passed since CNBC mainstay Mark Haines passed away. Former colleagues reflected on their longtime friend.

SocialTimes: Yahoo is giving its visitors a new experience with Axis. The search engine takes you from desktop to tablet.

10,000 Words: Twitter is just short on art for telling a story in 140 characters or less. New Yorker is taking it to the next level, tweeting an entire, 8,500-word short story. That should make for interesting RTs!

Veteran of WABC-TV, WNBC-TV to Host Business Show on WLIW/Channel 21

Longtime broadcast journalist Jim Paymar is joining Public Television. Paymar anchors and executive produces Long Island Business Report starting tonight at 10:30 on Channel 21/WLIW.

WLIW21’s new local production Long Island Business Report provides an in-depth look at what needs to be done to make Long Island a better place to live and work by exploring the economic and business trends that impact the nearly 3 million people who call Nassau and Suffolk counties home.

In the half-hour special, Paymar investigates the Fortune 1000 companies on Long Island, the cost of doing business, the cost of living, the state of Long Island’s infrastructure and the efforts to rebuild and revitalize its downtown areas.

“No future plans are confirmed at this time,” A WLIW/21 spokeswoman tells FishbowlNY. “We hope the viewer response to tonight’s premiere is positive.”

In his five decades in the TV business, Paymar made several New York stops. He was an anchor/correspondent at WNBC/Channel 4 in the mid 1990s. Paymar also had four-year stint at CNBC, ending in 2002.

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Trish Regan Joins Bloomberg TV

Bloomberg Television has hired Trish Regan as an anchor for its “Street Smart” program, which airs from 3 pm to 5 pm during the week. Regan comes to Bloomberg TV from ABC, where she worked as an economic expert; prior to that she was an anchor at CNBC.

In addition to her work on Street Smart, Regan will be appearing in primetime specials and help Bloomberg TV with its 2012 presidential election coverage.

“I’m thrilled to join Bloomberg Television,” said Regan. “We’re at a critical moment where the ability to cover business, the economy, and politics has never been more important to the audience.  Bloomberg has the worldwide resources to provide viewers with outstanding insight and true global coverage.”

Regan starts on January 9.

Former Bloomberg Radio Morning Anchors Ben Farnsworth and Peter Schacknow Knew Something Was ‘Very, Very Wrong’ as They Covered 9/11

During an 11-year span in the 1970s and 1980s, Ben Farnsworth (left) was known to millions as the afternoon co-anchor at WCBS NewsRadio 88.

But it was at Bloomberg Radio/WBBR where Farnsworth informed listeners about the tragedy of 9/11.

FishbowlNY continues our exploration of the tenth anniversary with 9/11: New York Remembers.

“It was just amazing,” Farnsworth says. “It just kind of came out of the blue.”

The day was even more bittersweet for the veteran Farnsworth.

“The irony is that 9/11 is my birthday,” Farnsworth tells FishbowlNY.  “It certainly affects my life every year on my birthday.”

Farnsworth did morning drive with Peter Schacknow from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. The team was only in its second week together when the attacks shocked the city.

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WSJ.com Managing Editor Blumenstein Named Journal Deputy Editor

journal logo 2.pngWall Street Journal managing editor Robert Thomson sent a memo to the paper’s staff yesterday announcing the appointment of Rebecca Blumenstein as international editor and deputy managing editor of the paper. Blumenstein, who was just appointed managing editor of WSJ.com in June, is replacing Nik Deogun, who is leaving print journalism altogether — he’s joining CNBC as the network’s managing editor.

Before joining WSJ.com earlier this year, Blumenstein served as international news editor and China editor at the paper, making her the perfect candidate to oversee the Journal‘s international coverage, Thomson pointed out. “[S]he is well aware of the challenges of life as a correspondent and acutely conscious of our digital potential, which she will continue to realize with her customary vigor and creativity,” he said in his memo.

Thomson’s full memo after the jump. Bonus points to anyone who can explain what the “troika” is at WSJ. (Update: We’ve learned that Thomson coined the term, which refers to the three deputy managing editors who coordinate the news teams and coverage for the Journal, in a memo last year. The troika is now made up of national editor Matt Murray, Page One editor Mike Williams and Blumenstein.)

Related: Rebecca Blumenstein Named WSJ.com Managing Editor –WebNewser

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It’s Official: Comcast Acquires NBCU Stake

Well the big media deal that has been much talked about all fall has finally been officially announced.

This morning, Comcast and General Electric announced that they are entering a joint venture that will include NBC Universal — valued at $30 billion — as well as Comcast’s cable nets, including E!, Versus and the Golf Channel, and its regional sports networks, among other Comcast assets — with a value of $7.25 billion. Comcast will now own 51 percent of the new venture, after paying $6.5 billion to GE in cash.

Now, the deal heads to the regulators for approval, and all media watchers are looking forward to see how the government handles the first big media deal under the Obama administration. The New York Times has gotten its hands on a memo sent today from NBCU CEO Jeff Zucker to his staff. Zucker has been put in charge of the new venture, and he will be reporting to Comcast’s COO. Said Zucker:

“We expect regulatory approvals to take 9 to 12 months. So, for now, it remains business as usual. And in fact, I expect this will be the case for the vast majority of you even after the deal closes. NBC Universal will continue to be, first and foremost, a world-class content company.”

After the jump, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt and Comcast CEO Brian Roberts in their first post-deal interview on CNBC this morning, in which they talk about their reasons behind seeking the deal, the future of their joint venture and what they think about the upcoming regulator approval process.

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