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Posts Tagged ‘CNBC’

Former Bloomberg Radio Morning Anchors Ben Farnsworth and Peter Schacknow Knew Something Was ‘Very, Very Wrong’ as They Covered 9/11

During an 11-year span in the 1970s and 1980s, Ben Farnsworth (left) was known to millions as the afternoon co-anchor at WCBS NewsRadio 88.

But it was at Bloomberg Radio/WBBR where Farnsworth informed listeners about the tragedy of 9/11.

FishbowlNY continues our exploration of the tenth anniversary with 9/11: New York Remembers.

“It was just amazing,” Farnsworth says. “It just kind of came out of the blue.”

The day was even more bittersweet for the veteran Farnsworth.

“The irony is that 9/11 is my birthday,” Farnsworth tells FishbowlNY.  “It certainly affects my life every year on my birthday.”

Farnsworth did morning drive with Peter Schacknow from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. The team was only in its second week together when the attacks shocked the city.

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WSJ.com Managing Editor Blumenstein Named Journal Deputy Editor

journal logo 2.pngWall Street Journal managing editor Robert Thomson sent a memo to the paper’s staff yesterday announcing the appointment of Rebecca Blumenstein as international editor and deputy managing editor of the paper. Blumenstein, who was just appointed managing editor of WSJ.com in June, is replacing Nik Deogun, who is leaving print journalism altogether — he’s joining CNBC as the network’s managing editor.

Before joining WSJ.com earlier this year, Blumenstein served as international news editor and China editor at the paper, making her the perfect candidate to oversee the Journal‘s international coverage, Thomson pointed out. “[S]he is well aware of the challenges of life as a correspondent and acutely conscious of our digital potential, which she will continue to realize with her customary vigor and creativity,” he said in his memo.

Thomson’s full memo after the jump. Bonus points to anyone who can explain what the “troika” is at WSJ. (Update: We’ve learned that Thomson coined the term, which refers to the three deputy managing editors who coordinate the news teams and coverage for the Journal, in a memo last year. The troika is now made up of national editor Matt Murray, Page One editor Mike Williams and Blumenstein.)

Related: Rebecca Blumenstein Named WSJ.com Managing Editor –WebNewser

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It’s Official: Comcast Acquires NBCU Stake

Well the big media deal that has been much talked about all fall has finally been officially announced.

This morning, Comcast and General Electric announced that they are entering a joint venture that will include NBC Universal — valued at $30 billion — as well as Comcast’s cable nets, including E!, Versus and the Golf Channel, and its regional sports networks, among other Comcast assets — with a value of $7.25 billion. Comcast will now own 51 percent of the new venture, after paying $6.5 billion to GE in cash.

Now, the deal heads to the regulators for approval, and all media watchers are looking forward to see how the government handles the first big media deal under the Obama administration. The New York Times has gotten its hands on a memo sent today from NBCU CEO Jeff Zucker to his staff. Zucker has been put in charge of the new venture, and he will be reporting to Comcast’s COO. Said Zucker:

“We expect regulatory approvals to take 9 to 12 months. So, for now, it remains business as usual. And in fact, I expect this will be the case for the vast majority of you even after the deal closes. NBC Universal will continue to be, first and foremost, a world-class content company.”

After the jump, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt and Comcast CEO Brian Roberts in their first post-deal interview on CNBC this morning, in which they talk about their reasons behind seeking the deal, the future of their joint venture and what they think about the upcoming regulator approval process.

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Daily News Loses Two Editors|Conn. University Student Paper Takes Heat|Maria Bartiromo Dropped From BusinessWeek|Forbes Buys FlipGloss|Comcast CEO Roberts

New York Post: The New York Daily News has lost two top editors, executive editor, David Ng and the deputy city editor Marilyn Matlick.

Connecticut Post: The Fairfield University independent student paper that published an offensive column earlier this year now faces harassment charges before the Connecticut school’s Student Conduct Board.

Talking Biz News: CNBC‘s Maria Bartiromo‘s BusinessWeek column will not be making the move to the Bloomberg-owned version of the magazine.

paidContent: Forbes Media bought photo publishing and online distribution platform FlipGloss.

New York Times: A profile of Comcast CEO Brian L. Roberts, who is currently negotiating a deal to buy a majority stake in NBC Universal.

News Corp.’s Carey: Consistency For Pay Walls Is Key

carey.jpgWhen Chase Carey speaks, the media world listens. And rightfully so. As Rupert Murdoch‘s number two, News Corp.‘s COO’s opinions do have a certain amount of clout.

This morning, at the Media and Money Conference, hosted by Nielsen and Dow Jones, Carey spoke about a number of topics — from Comcast seeking majority ownership of NBC Universal to the future of network television to pay walls for online journalism.

Carey said he thought the NBCU deal “makes sense for Comcast,” adding that it is a “pretty smartly structured deal” for the company. He also seemed pretty excited about the fact that the deal would test the regulatory waters under the new administration, perhaps setting the stage for or heading off other deals in the future. “These are uncharted waters with major issues with two big companies,” he said.

Carey seemed positive that the major players involved would be left with “regulatory baggage” after the deal was completed, although he doubted any assets would have to be sold.

As for pay walls, which News Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal has excelled at and Murdoch has pushed to extend across all his brands, Carey emphasized consistency. He said he was interested in “creating a great experience around content itself,” adding that people will pay for value and a good experience. “Quality journalism has value,” he said.

Later, when a reporter quizzed him about Murdoch’s plans to take his sites off Google and the Journal‘s leaky wall, Carey said he wanted the pay wall to remain consistent — if only subscribers can access certain content on WSJ.com, then others shouldn’t get it for free. But, there is some content you can get for free on the site, Carey pointed out. He didn’t outline any plans for creating the consistency he championed.

More from the Media and Money Conference, after the jump

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Business & Financial Reporting Emmy Noms Announced|CNN Protest In LA|A Look At McSweeney’s Broadsheet|Staten Island Advance Seeks To Trim Staff|Google’s Schmidt Values Editors

TVNewser: Nominees for the Business and Financial Reporting Emmy Awards we announced today. CBS gathered the most nods with 15 while PBS garnered four and CNBC and BBC America each received three.

FishbowlLA: 60 to 70 protesters gathered outside CNN‘s Los Angeles office today, protesting biased reporting by the news network of the debate over a public health insurance option.

BayNewser: A sneak peek at McSweeney’s upcoming broadsheet project.

Editor & Publisher: State Island Advance is looking for 40 staffers to take buyouts in order to avoid layoffs. The buyout offers include two weeks’ pay for every year of service up to six months of salary, along with medical coverage.

Nieman Journalism Lab: Google’s Eric Schmidt answered questions about how and why Google now distinguishes between news organizations and blogs in its search. “My guess is…it has a lot to do with the infrastructure around the writer. So a blog that’s associated with a major, legitimate organization…would be, I think, treated differently than an individual blogger who’s using his or her right of free expression to say whatever he thinks. So the presence of an editor, as an example. You know, an editor that’s not your mom.”

Media Moguls Make Their Mark On Fortune‘s “40 Under 40″ List

jmurdoch.jpgFortune magazine has revealed its “40 Under 40″ list — a compilation of the youngest and the brightest minds in the business world. And we were pleased to see a number of media executives making the cut and ranking near the top. Our industry could use all the young blood and new ideas it can get right now.

Topping the list are Google’s Sergey Brin and Larry Page — tied for first. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg is number two.

And coming in at number three is the first media mogul, News Corp. heir James Murdoch (above). Rupert Murdoch’s youngest son, James currently serves as chairman and CEO for News Corp.’s operations in Europe and Asia. Fun fact: he raised his desk so he can work standing up. So the key to rising to the top of an international media conglomerate by age 36 is never sitting down. We bet being the son of a media czar helps, too.

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Will Comcast Buy NBC Universal From GE?

nbcu.jpgRumors, theories and conjectures have been swirling since The Wrap reported yesterday that a deal between cable provider Comcast and GE-owned NBC Universal “had already been completed at a purchase price of $35 billion.”

But reps from Comcast later told Bloomberg, “the report that Comcast has a deal to purchase NBC Universal is inaccurate.”

However, that same report revaled that “negotiations for Comcast to buy about 50 percent of NBC Universal have been under way for at least two months.” Such a deal would depend on whether French company Vivendi SA decides to sell its 20 percent stake in NBCU.

After the jump, what some people around the industry are saying about the possible deal.

Update: Our sister blog TVNewser has an email from NBCU CEO Jeff Zucker to employees. Of the future of Vivendi’s stake, Zucker said, “They have not yet made us aware of any final decisions about their future with us; should they choose to exit, there are a number of possible things that could happen.”

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HuffPost Technology|CNBC Cancels Kneale|A Newspaper Bailout Bill?|Atlantic.com Blogger’s Plea Could Save Magazine|Times Co. Corrects SEC Filing

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

WebNewser: The Huffington Post launched its new technology section today. It’s being edited by former Washington Post national reporter Jose Antonio Vargas.

TVNewser: CNBC canceled former Forbes managing editor Dennis Kneale‘s “CNBC Reports,” but he’ll still anchor the network’s “Power Lunch.”

Toledo Blade: President Barack Obama said he would be open to a possible newspaper bailout bill. “I haven’t seen detailed proposals yet, but I’ll be happy to look at them,” he told reporters from The Toledo Blade and The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

The New York Times: Atlantic.com blogger Andrew Sullivan asked readers to subscribe to the print version of The Atlantic and it worked. “Within two days after last Monday’s post, Mr. Sullivan’s appeal pulled in 75 percent of the subscriptions that the Web site draws in a typical month…The Atlantic expects this month’s subscription orders to be double an average month’s.”

Associated Press: The New York Times Co. has corrected some errors in an SEC filing relating to stock options granted to CEO Janet Robinson and Arthur Sulzberger Jr.

Financial Journalists Give Shopping Tips In Cosmo

jenna1.jpgThe October issue of Cosmopolitan features some financial tips on shopping during a recession featuring Fox Business‘s Jenna Lee (right), CNBC‘s Rebecca Jarvis, ABC NewsBianna Golodryga and finance journalist Farnoosh Torabi.

The tips from the pros are pretty standard, but here they are, in case you’re interested:

- Jarvis suggests making purchases on a credit card that earns cash back or perks and splurging on a suit while picking up tank tops at H&M or Old Navy and accessories from J. Crew.

- Says Lee: “If it takes too long to rationalize buying an item, that’s an instant sign you shouldn’t have it.”

- Torabi advises not to splurge on sunglasses and suggests using cash to buy things under $100.

- Golodryga says she invests in black and neutral clothing and shops off season. She also wears flip flops and switches into designer shoes for events, in order to make her good shoes last longer.

More pictures of the financial fashion plates after the jump

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