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Posts Tagged ‘CNET’

Guardian US Adds Executive VP of Sales

GuardianUS_CarterBrokawAnd according to the latest comScore figures, Carter Brokaw has a robust product to work with. In August, the U.S. side of The Guardian racked up nearly 19 million unique visitors (including traffic from mobile devices).

Brokaw’s arrival, officially announced today, began October 8. He was previously a chief revenue officer with Slacker Radio and Meebo Inc., which was acquired by Google last year. He has also worked for Warner Music and CNET. From today’s announcement:

Carter spent over 10 years at CNET Networks, most recently as vice president of global sales. He helped the company architect a highly profitable integrated marketing platform for top-tier OEM’s and pioneered one of the first pay-for-performance revenue models, establishing a blueprint for online reseller merchants.

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Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Who Will Pay For News Content Online?

wwpost2.jpgBack in November, New York magazine asked of 100 people walking around SoHo about online content, and found that while an almost equal number admitted to getting just as much information from traditional newspapers as from the Internet, the majority (63 percent) said that they wouldn’t shell out cash to read The New York Times online.

Now a new poll by CNET proves that this particular subset of New Yorkers may have not have been the norm: the number of people unwilling to pay for content in America is actually much higher.

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Twitter Outage: What Happened

failwhale.jpgOkay, the Twitter outage yesterday wasn’t the end of the world. But it did put a crimp in our usual routine and made gathering breaking news and information that much more challenging for a good part of the day.

Yesterday, Twitter said its technical difficulties were a result of a denial of service attack, but what kind of person or group can launch such an attack and why would they do it? And can it happen again?

Our colleagues at WebNewser have a full report on the attacks that slowed down Twitter, as well as Facebook, LiveJournal and Google’s Blogger site. The attack seems to have been targeting a blogger from the Eastern European nation of Georgia, which is currently in the midst of a war with Russia, Facebook’s chief security officer Max Kelly told CNET News.

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Les Moonves and CNET: Out to Kill the Newspaper Star?

moonvesmixx.jpgLes Moonves hates newspapers! Or at least that’s the impression one might get based on recent comments he made recently at an annual advertising conference. The CBS head, who recently spearheaded the company’s surprising $1.8 billion purchase of CNET earlier this year, says that one of the upshots of CBS’s foray into the new media world is that it will “eliminate the need for dead tree media.”

One of the advantages of the Internet is we’re taking money away from the newspapers.

LAT In 90 Seconds

syesha_mercado_500.jpgUnclear on the Concept: A note to the latimes.com headline writers. You can’t say “Spoiler Alert” and then follow that up with a colon and the actual spoiler. That’s not an alert. That’s a headline that tells you exactly what’s going to happen on American Idol before you’ve had a chance to watch it. Sheesh.

38894550-15104013.jpgNew Deal Catapults CBS To One Of The Top 10 Internet Companies: CBS Corp. agreed to buy CNET Networks Inc., the Internet news and entertainment company, for $11.50 per share, or about $1.8-billion in cash.

ashlerills.jpgThis Never Woulda Happened On Friendster: A federal grand jury in L.A. indicted a 49-year-old woman of fraudulently using a MySpace account to “cyber-bully” a Missouri teenager “who later hanged herself because she believed she was being rejected by a 16-year-old boy she met on the social networking website.” Yeah. Try living with that.

Gerstmann Gone from Gamespot–What Really Happened?

ziffdavis.jpg

Kyle Orland has been all over the Gamespot drama saga. Just to catch you up:

Jeff Gerstmann, the editorial director at CNET’s Gamespot.com, was abruptly fired last Wednesday after 11 years at the site. There’s a rumor going around that Gerstmann was canned because he was overly critical of Kane & Lynch, a game that was heavily advertised on the site. Eidos,the publisher, allegedly threatened to pull hundreds of thousands of dollars in advertising if Gerstmann wasn’t fired.

CNET has denied that the firing was based on advertiser pressure, Eidos has issued a blanket “no comment” and Gerstmann isn’t talking about the circumstances surrounding the firing (citing “legal reasons”).

Despite this, the gaming community is up in arms over the issue, vandalizing “user review” pages on Gamespot, posting criticism on the site’s forums (over 12,600 posts at last count) and planning boycotts and protests at the CNET offices. Rival publisher Ziff Davis staged an impromptu rally at their offices (across the street from CNET) and gaming blog destructoid.com has changed their front page banner to criticize Gamespot.