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Posts Tagged ‘Conde Nast’

Elizabeth Chan Cracks the WLTW-FM Christmas Rotation

Every holiday season, New York radio station WLTW (a.k.a. 106.7 Lite FM) tinkers ever so slightly with its rotation of 24/7 Christmas music. If at all.

This season, a new voice is getting airplay alongside the three other artists added for 2014. Joining Band Aid 30, Seth MacFarlane and Idina Menzel is none other than Mediabistro success story Elizabeth Chan, the former Conde Nast employee who we wrote about this time last year.

“Just even learning that WLTW was going to add one of my songs, three years into writing Christmas music but really only two years into starting my company and songwriting business in earnest,” Chan tells FishbowlNY via telephone. “I was floored.”

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Condé Nast Has a Rat Problem

For Condé Nast, moving into their new home at One World Trade Center was supposed to be a time for celebration. Instead, it has been a time of extermination. The New York Daily News reports that the Condé offices have been overrun with rats, to the point where Anna Wintour refuses to go inside.

Initially, the furry guys were confined to the Vogue offices. Now they’ve spread. That’s what rats do — whatever the hell they want.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Google News Axed in Spain | Sony Execs Apologize for Emails

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Google News to Shut Down in Spain Over ‘Google Tax’ (Mashable)
Google said Thursday it will shut down its Google News service in Spain to prevent publishers’ content from appearing on it — ahead of a new law requiring the Internet search company to pay Spanish news organizations for linked content or snippets of news. NYT / Bits The website, which compiles headlines and summaries of news articles from various sources, will go dark in Spain on Dec. 16. Google plans to shut the site there in protest of the new law. The rules, which come into force in January, do not specify how much Google and others like Yahoo! News would have to pay per article. But they carry a potential one-time $750,000 fine if companies do not comply with the law. WSJ / Digits Google also is removing Spanish publishers from Google News world-wide. Those publications will still show up in general Google searches, but that’s less significant than it appears. That’s because the news “cluster” that appears with many general search results is fed by Google News. So if Spanish publishers are excluded from Google News, they won’t appear in the news cluster of ordinary search results — meaning much less traffic from Google. GigaOM Spain is not the first European country to pass a so-called ancillary copyright law — Germany did so in March 2013 — but Spain’s version is much more heavy-handed. Variety In Germany, the ancillary copyright law, introduced in July after lobbying by VG Media and backed by Axel Springer, obliged Google to pay publishers for news snippet texts on its search engine. After Google News removed the snippets from its search engine, traffic to publishers’ websites fell by 40 percent over two weeks. VG Media was forced to authorize the snippets. Demonstrating Google’s massive market power, Axel Springer CEO Mathias Dopfer dubbed its move to charge for snippets “the most successful failure in our history.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Gawker Shakes Up Leadership | Guardian EIC to Step Down

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Gawker Makes Leadership Changes (FishbowlNY)
Nick Denton has announced some major changes to the leadership structure at Gawker Media. Instead of Denton having all the oversight, a collective of seven managing partners (including Denton) “will consult on major matters such as tech investments and the reassignment of department heads,” according to a memo. NYT The move was in part because of the company’s editorial failures in the last year. Denton said he would stay on as chief executive and remain involved in the company’s future, but that recent failures in management had shown he needed more support. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The move, Denton said, was part of an effort to scale back his day-to-day managerial roles and return to blogging, which he called “the only truly new media in the age of the Web” and “the essential act of journalism in an interactive and conversational age.” The move also suggests that Gawker Media may be gearing up for an acquisition or merger of some sort. Denton said that no such activity was afoot. GigaOM The new management structure will make it easier to respond to the increasing competitive threat from sites like BuzzFeed and Vox, Denton said, since decisions will be made by the committee as a whole rather than everyone having to try and get the founder’s attention at the same time. The new group includes former Deadspin editor Tommy Craggs as head of editorial operations, effectively replacing editor-in-chief Joel Johnson, who announced recently that he had been fired. Capital New York The rest of the managing board includes president Heather Dietrick, chief strategy officer Erin Pettigrew, advertising head Andrew Gorenstein, chief operating officer Scott Kidder and chief technology officer Tom Plunkett, who will continue to work on the product side but shed the title of CTO. The memo also mentions that Gawker’s revenues are up 30 percent year-over-year and the company has hired Paul Sundue to head Studio@Gawker, the company’s in-house native advertising agency.

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Condé Nast Launches Lead Contributors Program

conde nast entertainment GCondé Nast Entertainment (CNE) is attempting to build out its digital verticals by partnering with Internet sensations. The company has announced a “lead contributor” program, and it starts with YouTube/Instagram/Twitter darling Kandee Johnson.

Johnson will become lead beauty contributor for CNE, and CNE will help Johnson with content creation, distribution and media sales. Johnson’s videos will now appear on CNE’s video hub The Scene, across CNE brands and more. CNE will also develop potential TV and movie projects with Johnson.

We’re assuming that Condé is compensating Johnson, but we’ve reached out to the company just to confirm.

Johnson is the first of a variety of lead contributors that CNE plans to announce over the next few months.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Amazon, Hachette End Dispute | CNN Picks Up Three Originals

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Hachette, Amazon Establish New Multi-Year Contract (GalleyCat)
Hachette Book Group and Amazon have established a new multi-year agreement. The two companies have been locked in a dispute since April. THR The companies have reached a new agreement covering eBook and print sales in the U.S. The two were reportedly in a standoff over eBook revenues, with the online retailer reportedly delaying shipments, reducing discounts and preventing people from preordering Hachette titles. Mashable The dispute began when Amazon stopped taking preorders for Hachette titles. Since that time, the two have dialed up the rhetoric, with Hachette authors Malcolm Gladwell and James Patterson criticizing Amazon, while the online retailer charged that Hachette was “stonewalling” about making a deal. WSJ Neither side claimed victory and it may be that both Hachette and Amazon made concessions in the end. Under the new eBook agreement, which will take effect in early 2015, Hachette will set the prices of its consumer titles. The companies said Hachette will get better terms when it “delivers lower prices for readers.” Amazon said on Thursday it has resumed treating Hachette titles as it did before the dispute. NYT The conflict, which played out in increasingly contentious forums as the year progressed, left wounds too deep for true celebration Thursday. Amazon has been cast as a bully in publications across the ideological spectrum, and a large group of authors is calling for it to be investigated on antitrust grounds. Its sales were hit by the dispute, analysts said. Amazon’s supporters publicly questioned the need for Hachette, the fourth largest publisher, to exist in an era when anyone can publish themselves digitally, an accusation Hachette was reluctant to respond to. And even if Amazon got less in the deal than it originally wanted, it still controls nearly half the book trade, an unprecedented level for one retailer. And the dispute showed it is not afraid to use its power to discourage sales.

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GQ Cuts Five

CondeNast304x200As Condé Nast continues its migration to One World Trade Center, the company has lightened the load. According to The New York Post, GQ has cut five staffers on its digital side, including multimedia editor Kevin Sintumuang. Sintumuang had served at GQ since 2012.

This just the latest round of layoffs that began in early October, when Condé cut 50 staffers. The company also recently restructured its digital leadership team, and in doing so added Fred Santarpia as chief digital officer and cut CTO Joe Simon.

Additionally, Condé made Style.com’s editor and publisher report to Vogue’s editor and publisher.

Ex-New York Media Pair Sell Telluride Weekly

SethCaginMartaTarbellPicGiven the current state of print media, this is probably about as good as it can get in a smaller market like Telluride.

Eighteen years after launching The Watch as a fax newsletter, Seth Cagin and Marta Tarbell have sold their in-the-red operation to Monday-to-Friday competitor The Telluride Daily Planet. According to a report in the latter by Heather Sackett, the Planet will continue to publish this newly acquired property:

“We have not finalized plans for content changes, but we will likely be doing some new, more in-depth feature reporting in the weekly Watch newspaper — the kind of reporting that we can’t necessarily do in the Planet and that is not really available in the region,” Daily Planet publisher Andrew Mirrington said.

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Style.com Changes Reporting Structure

Style.com is getting swept under the Vogue rug. Well, maybe that’s a bit dramatic. According to WWD, the site’s publisher Matt Rice and will now report to Vogue’s publisher Susan Plagemann. Likewise, Style.com’s editor — Dirk Standen — will now report to Vogue’s editor, Anna Wintour.

The move seems to indicate that Condé Nast execs aren’t too pleased with Style.com. At the very least, they want to give the site a kick in the pants via changes in content and strategy.

As WWD reports, a Style.com/Vogue combo is actually quite retro:

Fourteen years ago, the site was established as the online home of Vogue and W magazines. But Wintour lobbied for years for her own site for Vogue, and so, in 2010, Style.com was pushed out of Condé Nast to Fairchild Fashion Media. It was shuffled back to Condé this summer, when Fairchild was sold to Penske Media Corp.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Condé Nast Moves to 1 WTC | Car Talk’s Tom Magliozzi Dies at 77

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Condé Nast Moves to 1 World Trade Center (FishbowlNY)
The first wave of Condé Nast staffers settled into their new digs at 1 World Trade Center Monday morning. THR Thirteen years after the 9/11 terrorist attack, the resurrected World Trade Center, a 104-story, $3.9 billion skyscraper that dominates the Manhattan skyline, is opening for business, marking an emotional milestone for both New Yorkers and the nation. The publishing giant becomes the first commercial tenant in America’s tallest building. Mashable The building is currently just 60 percent leased. About 170 employees of Condé Nast’s 3,400 workers moved into the skyscraper. The rest of the company, which signed a 25-year lease for 1 million square feet, will move there in 2015. New York Post The sparkling new building is the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. It had originally been slated to open in 2006, but cost overruns and political infighting led to delays. Other new tenants include the General Services Administration and the ad firm Kids Creative. NYT The workers that began Monday are what Condé Nast calls corporate employees, meaning that they do not work for any one of its magazines in particular. Some work in human relations, some in accounting. Glamour? It will come later, as will Vogue, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker and Condé Nast’s other magazines.

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