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Posts Tagged ‘Conde Nast’

Condé Nast Relocation to 1 WTC Begins in November

The great Condé Nast migration — from 4 Times Square to 1 World Trade Center — will begin in November. That’s according to a memo from the company’s CEO, Chuck Townsend.

In the note, which was obtained by Capital New York, Townsend explained that the move will start with Condé Nast Entertainment, and then progress from there.

Townsend’s note also gave some details about the new space, including the extra 1 WTC floors the company bought in January of 2012:

At 1WTC, we will occupy 1.2 million square feet on floors 20 through 44. Our corporate departments will largely occupy the first five floors as well as the top three floors, and our brands will predominantly be on floors 25 through 33 and 36 through 41. We have two remarkable amenity floors on 34 and 35 connected by an extraordinary interior spiral staircase. These floors will house our visitors reception, conference center, library, auditorium, art gallery, private dining, cafeteria and after-hours café.

Charles Townsend on Steering the Condé Nast Ship

CharlesTownsendThumbEmily Steel, who covers the marketing and media beats for the Financial Times, recently had the opportunity to sit down with 69-year-old Condé Nast chief executive officer Charles Townsend. The resulting feature is perfect MLK Monday holiday reading.

Townsend, a past commodore of the New York Yacht Club who named his own vessel Current Issue, sounds like he’s describing some very bad sailing weather when he talked to Steel about the past few years at the Condé Nast helm (he came on board in 2004). Challenges come “from every direction” and the horizon is “so different now.”

Townsend tells Steel that he loves it when creative director Anna Wintour previews upcoming issues with him. He also notes that the publishing company was a little late to the Internet party:

Townsend admits that it has taken a long time for Condé Nast to develop the right attitude towards the Web. “We did it the hard way,” he says. “We learnt with black eyes and bloody noses.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Cuts at Kushner Papers | Time Warner Sells HQ | Manjoo to NYT

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Layoffs at OC Register, Riverside Press-Enterprise (LA Times / Money & Co.)
Significant layoffs hit the newsrooms Thursday at the Orange County Register and Riverside Press-Enterprise, a troubling sign for the Aaron Kushner-owned publications. Exact numbers have not been released at the Register, although the cuts there are reported to number roughly 35 people. The paper’s editor, Ken Brusic, and most other top editorial managers have departed, according to multiple sources in the newsroom who asked not to be named because they were not authorized to speak. LA Times The elimination of 71 employees, many of them seasoned journalists, marks a sharp reversal by Kushner, who controls Freedom Communications Inc., which owns both papers. The former greeting card executive had spent much of the last 18 months growing his publications, acquiring additional news outlets and hiring more than 100 reporters and editors in the process. LA Observed It’s all about restructuring for the future, including the Register‘s upcoming invasion of Los Angeles County, Kushner says. The “content team,” as he puts it, is now 172 people larger than when he arrived, Kushner writes. Donna Wares, previously announced as editor-in-charge of the LA Register, will become managing editor. Poynter / MediaWire Rob Curley is the new editor of the Register. He replaces Brusic, who the Register says is “stepping down as part of a reorganization of the newspaper’s newsroom.”

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Kim France on Launching Lucky: ‘It was terrifying’

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Kim France has had the unique experience of starting a magazine from scratch. Back in 1999, Conde Nast hired France to launch a magazine about shopping. They called it Lucky.

“It’s a very rare and unusual privilege to get to start a magazine,” France says. “It doesn’t happen every day or even every month or year…It was incredibly thrilling. It was also quite terrifying.”

Check out the video after the jump for more from France, including how she started her new fashion blog, Girls of a Certain Age.

To watch more mediabistroTV videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV.

Keija Minor, Editor-in-Chief of Brides, on Her Legacy

keija-minor2Keija Minor has gone through quite a few career reinventions in her life. She started out as a corporate lawyer, decided it wasn’t her passion, and then took a major pay cut to became an intern at a startup magazine, Travel Savvy. Boy, did it pay off. Minor went from intern to EIC in three years, then, after stints at Niche Media and Uptown magazine, on to Condé Nast, where she is currently editor-in-chief of Brides.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Minor talks about taking a leap of faith in her career, her advice for freelancers pitching to Brides and her unique position at the top:

You are the first African American to hold a top title at a Condé Nast publication. Is that something you think about?
I think the industry has been changing generally just over the years, as all of corporate America has been changing, to some degree, to reflect more women and more diversity. I think with the title at Condé, you know, it’s fun to be the first. It’s exciting to be the first in any sort of category, and it’s an honor. But I don’t wake up every day thinking, ‘Okay, you’re the first black woman to hold this title.’ I think about, ‘What are you going to do to move the magazine forward?’ At the end of the day, yes, I will have been the first, but I also want to be the woman who knocks it out of the park as an editor.

To hear more from Minor, including what she thinks of Anna Wintour, read: So What Do You Do Keija Minor, Brides Editor-in-Chief?

Mediabistro Ad Leads Elizabeth Chan to a Very Kardashian Christmas

There was a nice write-up this week in NYDN‘s “New York @Confidential” about Elizabeth Chan, a former Condé Nast employee who has found quick success as a Christmas music singer-songwriter. Her single “Fa La La” is climbing the holiday charts, while nine of a staggering 300 Chan songs were recently licensed for possible use in the Kardashian sisters’ E! December 1 Christmas special.

Kickstarter played a key role in Chan’s bold new career, but so too did Mediabistro. While at Condé Nast, where she was an executive producer-director of integrated marketing for Self magazine and a consumer business development consultant, Chan liked to peruse our website.

“I found a link that asked something along the lines of, ‘What is the one dream you’ve had that you were too afraid to try? What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?’”

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NYU Journalism Students, Faculty Mourn End of Condé Nast Internship Program

In our post last week about all the big changes at Racked, one of the people we mentioned was Laura Gurfein. The former Racked intern has moved up to regular freelancer. As she completes her final semester at NYU, she is also now interning for Elle.

conde_x200So who better than Gurfein to update us on  the impact at NYU of Condé Nast’s recent decision to end its storied internship program. There has been a lot of ink devoted to the legal motivations for the decision, but not so much about how it affects innocent J-school bystanders:

“This is a huge disappointment [for our students]“, said Meryl Gordon, the director of the magazine writing program for graduate students at New York University’s journalism school. She estimated that approximately 50 graduate journalism students intern with Condé Nast each year. “And I also think it’s a loss to Condé Nast, because they’re able to get the first crack at some of our most talented students.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Condé Ditches Interns | SpinMedia Cuts Staff | Layoffs at HuffPost

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Condé Nast Discontinuing Internship Program (WWD / Memo Pad) Condé Nast has decided to discontinue its internship program starting in 2014, WWD has learned. The end of the program comes after the publisher was sued this summer by two former interns who claimed they were paid below the minimum wage during internships at W and The New Yorker. The Guardian The pair suing Condé Nast claim the law was breached because the publisher was gaining an advantage from their labor. Lauren Ballinger, who worked at W magazine in 2009, compared her work there unfavorably with Anne Hathaway’s experience in the film The Devil Wears Prada, after she spent days packing accessories for editors. The other, Matthew Leib, said he was paid between $300 and $500 for the two summers he worked for the New Yorker‘s cartoon archives. FishbowlNY Condé isn’t the only media company brought to court over failing to pay interns. Gawker, Fox Searchlight and Hearst have all been sued for the same reason. The difference is that Condé has now taken the bold step of eliminating the issue completely. If you have no interns, there’s no way to get sued for not paying them. Gawker The media class comprises thousands of former unpaid interns, so you’re going to hear a lot about how their internships were so valuable, so demanding yet fulfilling — look at them now! — that they just can’t believe Condé would do such a thing. Gosh, kill their internship program! You’d think the company, and maybe the entire media industry, was closing down for good. BuzzFeed / Politics While the end of Condé Nast’s sought-after internship program might irk some job-seekers looking for a way into the media’s biggest names, advocates fighting to get interns paid say the elimination of internships at the company signals that there will be better opportunities for job seekers down the road.

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Condé Nast to Stop Internship Program

Condé Nast is discontinuing its internship program. WWD reports that the change will go into effect next year. All current interns will remain with the company through the end of their predetermined terms.

We’re sure this has nothing to do with the fact that Condé was recently sued by two former interns. Lauren Ballinger, a former W intern, and Matthew Leib, a former intern at The New Yorker, claimed in their suit that Condé paid them less than $1 an hour while they worked for the magazines. That case is still pending.

Condé isn’t the only media company brought to court over failing to pay interns. Gawker, Fox Searchlight and Hearst have all been sued for the same reason.

The difference is that Condé has now taken the bold step of eliminating the issue completely. If you have no interns, there’s no way to get sued for not paying them.

Kickstarter Feeds Food Policy Blog Civil Eats

There’s a brand new addition to Kickstarter’s most funded Publishing campaigns page. At around 5:51 p.m. ET last Friday, Civil Eats – a website that keeps a critical eye on the American food system – squeaked by its $100,000 goal and wound up with just a few hundred dollars to spare.

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But the important thing is that the site made its goal. In the five years that Civil Eats has been functioning, co-founders Naomi Starkman and Paula Crossfield (pictured, l to r) have never taken a salary or been able to pay contributors. But thanks to 1,153 backers, a lot of that is about to change:

Now that we’ve raised the initial money – it is after all, a Kickstarter, money to help us kick start our long-term goals – we will begin the process of bringing on a managing editor, create a pay structure to begin paying our writers and contributors, and developing and implementing a membership program to encourage individual support on the site.

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