TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Conde Nast’

Mediabistro Ad Leads Elizabeth Chan to a Very Kardashian Christmas

There was a nice write-up this week in NYDN‘s “New York @Confidential” about Elizabeth Chan, a former Condé Nast employee who has found quick success as a Christmas music singer-songwriter. Her single “Fa La La” is climbing the holiday charts, while nine of a staggering 300 Chan songs were recently licensed for possible use in the Kardashian sisters’ E! December 1 Christmas special.

Kickstarter played a key role in Chan’s bold new career, but so too did Mediabistro. While at Condé Nast, where she was an executive producer-director of integrated marketing for Self magazine and a consumer business development consultant, Chan liked to peruse our website.

“I found a link that asked something along the lines of, ‘What is the one dream you’ve had that you were too afraid to try? What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?’”

Read more

NYU Journalism Students, Faculty Mourn End of Condé Nast Internship Program

In our post last week about all the big changes at Racked, one of the people we mentioned was Laura Gurfein. The former Racked intern has moved up to regular freelancer. As she completes her final semester at NYU, she is also now interning for Elle.

conde_x200So who better than Gurfein to update us on  the impact at NYU of Condé Nast’s recent decision to end its storied internship program. There has been a lot of ink devoted to the legal motivations for the decision, but not so much about how it affects innocent J-school bystanders:

“This is a huge disappointment [for our students]“, said Meryl Gordon, the director of the magazine writing program for graduate students at New York University’s journalism school. She estimated that approximately 50 graduate journalism students intern with Condé Nast each year. “And I also think it’s a loss to Condé Nast, because they’re able to get the first crack at some of our most talented students.”

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Condé Ditches Interns | SpinMedia Cuts Staff | Layoffs at HuffPost

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Condé Nast Discontinuing Internship Program (WWD / Memo Pad) Condé Nast has decided to discontinue its internship program starting in 2014, WWD has learned. The end of the program comes after the publisher was sued this summer by two former interns who claimed they were paid below the minimum wage during internships at W and The New Yorker. The Guardian The pair suing Condé Nast claim the law was breached because the publisher was gaining an advantage from their labor. Lauren Ballinger, who worked at W magazine in 2009, compared her work there unfavorably with Anne Hathaway’s experience in the film The Devil Wears Prada, after she spent days packing accessories for editors. The other, Matthew Leib, said he was paid between $300 and $500 for the two summers he worked for the New Yorker‘s cartoon archives. FishbowlNY Condé isn’t the only media company brought to court over failing to pay interns. Gawker, Fox Searchlight and Hearst have all been sued for the same reason. The difference is that Condé has now taken the bold step of eliminating the issue completely. If you have no interns, there’s no way to get sued for not paying them. Gawker The media class comprises thousands of former unpaid interns, so you’re going to hear a lot about how their internships were so valuable, so demanding yet fulfilling — look at them now! — that they just can’t believe Condé would do such a thing. Gosh, kill their internship program! You’d think the company, and maybe the entire media industry, was closing down for good. BuzzFeed / Politics While the end of Condé Nast’s sought-after internship program might irk some job-seekers looking for a way into the media’s biggest names, advocates fighting to get interns paid say the elimination of internships at the company signals that there will be better opportunities for job seekers down the road.

Read more

Condé Nast to Stop Internship Program

Condé Nast is discontinuing its internship program. WWD reports that the change will go into effect next year. All current interns will remain with the company through the end of their predetermined terms.

We’re sure this has nothing to do with the fact that Condé was recently sued by two former interns. Lauren Ballinger, a former W intern, and Matthew Leib, a former intern at The New Yorker, claimed in their suit that Condé paid them less than $1 an hour while they worked for the magazines. That case is still pending.

Condé isn’t the only media company brought to court over failing to pay interns. Gawker, Fox Searchlight and Hearst have all been sued for the same reason.

The difference is that Condé has now taken the bold step of eliminating the issue completely. If you have no interns, there’s no way to get sued for not paying them.

Kickstarter Feeds Food Policy Blog Civil Eats

There’s a brand new addition to Kickstarter’s most funded Publishing campaigns page. At around 5:51 p.m. ET last Friday, Civil Eats – a website that keeps a critical eye on the American food system – squeaked by its $100,000 goal and wound up with just a few hundred dollars to spare.

CivilEats_NaomiPaula

But the important thing is that the site made its goal. In the five years that Civil Eats has been functioning, co-founders Naomi Starkman and Paula Crossfield (pictured, l to r) have never taken a salary or been able to pay contributors. But thanks to 1,153 backers, a lot of that is about to change:

Now that we’ve raised the initial money – it is after all, a Kickstarter, money to help us kick start our long-term goals – we will begin the process of bringing on a managing editor, create a pay structure to begin paying our writers and contributors, and developing and implementing a membership program to encourage individual support on the site.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Traveler Lays Off 17 | NJ Paper Avoids Shutdown | Tribune Co. to Cut $100M


Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Traveler Layoffs Reach 17 as Condé Nast Title Adopts A Softer Focus (Capital New York)
Fourteen Condé Nast Traveler employees were laid off Wednesday, bringing the total number of staffers cut under new editor-in-chief Pilar Guzmán to 17, a source familiar with the matter told Capital. NY Post Guzmán is said to have handed walking papers to executive editor Kevin Doyle and senior editors Alison Humes and Dinda Elliott, the daughter of the late famed Newsweek editor Osborne Elliot. Guzmán, raided from Martha Stewart Living, where she was the editor-in-chief, started shaking things up within days of her arrival at Condé. WWD / Memo Pad Since its inception, Traveler’s commitment to serious travel journalism was embodied in the logo coined by founding editor Harry Evans, “Truth in Travel.” The layoffs suggest that credo may too be discarded, or at least, take on a whole new meaning. FishbowlNY Dropping Doyle, Humes and Elliott might help Guzmán shape Traveler to her liking, but anyone who has been following Condé drama lately knows that these moves must’ve been approved by Anna Wintour. Wintour has been overseeing more cuts than a Jo-Ann Fabric scrapbooking class. Bloomberg “This is part of a broader restructuring effort that will shift the focus on more of a lifestyle lens and the growing digital business,” said Sarina Sanandaji, a spokeswoman for the magazine. The magazine is likely to replace some of the positions, she said.

Read more

Anna Wintour’s Hand of Death Hovers Over Glamour

Death gaze!

Ever since Anna Wintour was named artistic director of Condé Nast, her power and influence have grown. As we’ve mentioned, that has meant bad things for Condé editors who aren’t up to snuff. The New York Times reports that Wintour’s death gaze has now turn to Glamour, which means Cindi Leive, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, had better look alive. While she can.

Recently Wintour signed off on the firing of Klara Glowczewska (the longtime editor of Condé Nast Traveler) and Brandon Holley (the editor of Lucky). Pilar Guzmán and Eva Chen — their replacements, respectively — were Wintour endorsed. With that done, Wintour’s icy hand of death has started flipping the pages of Glamour:

Now Ms. Wintour is turning her attention to Glamour, which has lost over 28 percent of its newsstand sales in the year ending in June, and perhaps other magazines as well. According to a magazine executive at a competing company with direct knowledge of the discussions, a creative director at his company was approached about working in a similar role for Glamour, and told that the post would report to Ms. Wintour, not Cindi Leive, the magazine’s editor. (Mr. Townsend acknowledged the discussions, but said the reporting line detail was “dead wrong.”)

Of course Wintour maintains that editors shouldn’t feel like her presence means they should update their wills.

Read more

Condé Nast Partners with Amazon for New Subscription Service

Condé Nast, in an attempt to streamline its subscription service, has partnered with Amazon.com. The deal involves a new service called “All Access,” which will allow consumers to buy, manage and renew their print and digital Condé subscriptions, using their Amazon account.

VogueGlamourBon AppétitLuckyGolf DigestVanity Fair and Wired are the first titles available via All Access. The remaining glossies will be added by the end of the year. To entice new subscribers, Condé is offering an introductory deal, which includes All Access to magazines for $6 or less for six months worth of issues.

While financial terms weren’t disclosed, we imagine Amazon will take a cut of the subscriptions Condé gains from All Access. Still, this is a smart move for both companies. For Condé, it brings their brands into the homes of millions of people who might not already be readers; for Amazon, it gives users yet another reason to log in. All Access is definitely all good.

Vanity Fair and Vogue Get TV Deals

Vanity Fair and Vogue are getting into the TV business. According to The Wall Street Journal, the Condé Nast titles have inked deals with Discovery Communications to launch two shows: Vanity Fair Confidential and Fashion Fund.

The crime and mystery show Confidential, based on a series of VF articles, will air on Investigation Discovery channel, and Fashion Fund, based on a design contest sponsored by Vogue, will air on Ovation channel.

Magazine articles serving as the source for TV shows and movies is nothing new, but what is worth noting here is that these two deals are seemingly more friendly to Condé Nast, not writers. Older Condé contracts gave writers royalties if their pieces hit the big screen, but newer contracts do not give out as much. Unsurprisingly, magazine editors and writers aren’t happy with that, which makes sense, since without their ideas the shows wouldn’t exist.

Dawn Ostroff, head of Condé Nast Entertainment — the division of the publishing house that handles TV and movie deals — told the Journal that writers still get “a fair market value” for their work. Let’s hope that’s true.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Rolling Stone Fallout | Netflix’s Emmy Noms | Condé Nast’s Ad Growth


Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Boston Magazine Counters Rolling Stone‘s Boston Bomber Cover: ‘This Is The Real Face of Terror’ (TheWrap / MediaAlley)
Boston Magazine published never-before-seen photos of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Thursday in response to Rolling Stone‘s controversial cover that critics felt depicted the accused murderer as a rock star. The photos, supplied by Mass. state police sergeant Sean Murphy, were intended to show the “real face of terror.” In one, a bloodied Tsarnaev emerges from his boat hideout while a sniper rifle trains its laser sight on his head. Boston Magazine Sean Murphy: “As a professional law-enforcement officer of 25 years, I believe that the image that was portrayed by Rolling Stone magazine was an insult to any person who has ever worn a uniform of any color or any police organization or military branch, and the family members who have ever lost a loved one serving in the line of duty. The truth is that glamorizing the face of terror is not just insulting to the family members of those killed in the line of duty, it also could be an incentive to those who may be unstable to do something to get their face on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. The Atlantic Wire While Murphy’s photographs certainly put some distance between Tsarnaev and the audience, both physically and emotionally, they will, like nearly any photograph, depend on the interpretation of the viewer to complete their message. Rolling Stone‘s image’s normalcy is uncomfortable, but its eeriness speaks volumes. The new images depict a man, at a distance, defeated. But in them, he is also seen at his most vulnerable. CNN John Wolfson, Boston Magazine‘s editor-in-chief, said the magazine has hundreds of similar photos and will publish more in its September issue. Boston Globe / MetroDesk A state police spokesman said Thursday night that Murphy had been relieved of duty for one day and will be subject to an internal investigation. “His duty status will be determined at a hearing in the near future,” said spokesman David Procopio. “[Thursday’s] dissemination to Boston Magazine of photographs of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and police activity related to his capture was not authorized by the Massachusetts State Police,” Procopio said in a statement. Boston Magazine Just one day after the curtain was raised on the Rolling Stone cover featuring Tsarnaev, one day before it hit newsstands, there were several copies of the magazine selling on eBay for around $20.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>