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Posts Tagged ‘Crain’s’

What Titles Were You Sad To Lose In 2009?

gourmet.jpgIt hasn’t been the easiest year for print journalism. Crain’s New York Business reported Friday that 367 magazines have been axed in the last 12 months, with 64 going online-only, according to preliminary numbers from online database Mediafinder.com. (In October, Mediafinder said 383 had already closed up shop during the first nine months for the year).

According to The Business Insider, by July over 105 newspapers received similar treatment. Many more have had to scale back or go to an almost entirely digital format to survive.

In early October, Condé Nast took a particularly brutal hit with the shuttering of four titles: Gourmet, Cookie, Modern Bride, and Elegant Bride. And those closures came months after Condé folded Domino and Portfolio earlier in the year.

Still, it could have been worse…The New York Times is still around, despite some pessimistic predictions, right? So we here at FishbowlNY would like to hear from our readers: which closing affected you the most? Feel free to add your own to our list, and remember, we’re sticking to print publications (RIP Jossip.com) that disappeared in 2009, not including any that went online-only. And pass it along to your friends — we’ll be taking your answers into consideration next week, when we feature some year-end lists handpicked by the FishbowlNY editors. What can we say, it’s that time of year.


What print title will you miss the most?(trends)

Read More: 367 magazines shuttered in 2009Crain’s

Previously: Breaking: Condé Shutters Four Magazines: Cookie, Gourmet, Two Bridal Titles, Report: More Than 100 Magazines Shuttered In Last Three Months

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Greg David Leaves Crain’s For Higher Education

greg.jpgTomorrow will be the last day for Crain’s New York Business‘ editorial director Greg David, who is leaving the pub after more than 33 years at Crain Communications.

David is leaving his full-time gig at Crain’s to become the director of the business and economics program at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. “I have been teaching there for three years and it is an exciting opportunity,” he said in an email today.

However, David said he will still write a weekly column in Crain’s print edition as well as a daily blog on the Web site, and “may do other editorial projects from time to time,” so he won’t be far from the pub. He’s also planning on making media appearances on WCBS Newsradio 880 and WNYC, giving speeches and moderating panels in addition to his duties at the journalism school.

During his long career at Crain’s, David spent 23 years as editor of the paper, joining just a few months after it started publishing in January 1985. In September 2008, the paper hired a new editor, Xana Antunes, and David moved into the role of editorial director. He previously worked for The Sarasota Herald Tribune and The Charlotte Observer.

Previously: Crain’s Hires New Editor, Previous Ed To Pen Book

NY Nonprofit Buys Investigative Public Policy Pub City Limits

city limits.jpgThe nonprofit Community Service Society of New York is launching a journalism experiment, by buying investigative public policy publication City Limits for $200,000.

CSS plans to retain the title’s current staff and name, and will invest $1 million into it, in the hopes of spinning it off into an independent publication within six months, Crain’s reports.

CSS’s vice president of government relations and public affairs, Walter Fields, will be taking over the role of publisher, and he plans to immediately revamp the magazine’s Web site and increase the print pub’s frequency to eight times a year up from four. The magazine will also be available on newsstands.

Recently, a slew of nonprofit investigative news outlets have taken root, from The Huffington Post‘s new venture to The Texas Tribune. Following this nonprofit model, and backed by a powerful nonprofit group, City Limits has the chance to add to the discourse in New York City in a positive way. But CSS president David Jones promises the pub will act independently, albeit with a clear mission:

“Clearly the news environment in New York City has changed dramatically. The discussion on many of the things we work on — poverty, the working poor and moderate income people — doesn’t get much space in mainstream media.”

NYC nonprofit takes on journalism assignmentCrain’s New York Business

Related: HuffPo Launching Nonprofit Investigative Journalism Venture

The Daily Beast: Advertising Deal in the Works

picture-4.pngCrain’s currently has a piece up about The Daily Beast‘s advertising plan, or apparent lack thereof. The article reports that Tina Brown and company have yet to seriously pursue any ad deals — the site has been primarily ad free since it launched — and instead appear to be counting on the deep pockets of Beast backer Barry Diller.

At a panel in January Beast general manager Caroline Marks touched on the topic saying the site was “in a stage of evolving ad and sponsorship, and that “The Beast isn’t an open ended thing — there is a realistic time frame…Barry [Diller] runs businesses we are expected to run ourselves as a business.”

During a talk in February, Brown herself addressed the matter saying the Beast wanted to “create interesting looking advertising models, and places to do it on our site, and we want it to be as strongly and stylishly designed as the rest of it.”

So where do things stand at the moment?

Read more