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Posts Tagged ‘Crain’s New York Business’

Proverbial Fat Lady Frames New York City Opera Coverage

Take your misdirected-allegory pick. That is if you believe the expression “It ain’t over til the fat lady sings” has everything to do with the late Kate Smith and little do with arias.

The “fat lady” is all over today’s coverage of the New York City Opera’s announcement that it has been forced to cancel the 2013-14 season and file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. She’s singing the lede at Crain’s New York Business; belting out the headline for TIME; and being rudely pluralized in the New York Daily News.

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Crain’s New York Resorts to ‘Weiner Tip Jar’

There’s a funny item in today’s print edition of Crain’s New York Business. Editor Glenn Coleman explains that because the Anthony Weiner puns started to get out of hand (pun intended) in the newsroom, an age-old solution was instituted:

If someone uttered a Weiner pun, much less proposed writing it in a story or headline, they had to deposit 25 cents into what reporters immediately dubbed the “Weiner tip jar.”

“You know the word ‘tip’ could be considered a pun,” someone blithely noted. Quarter for the tip jar, several staffers sing-sung. “This is nuts.” ‘Nother quarter for the tip jar. We were at $2 lickety, um, $2.25 lickety-split.

By late last Friday, Coleman says the total was up to a surprisingly low $6.50. Still good for a couple of dork-namesakes in a bun. And extra points to Coleman for ending the online version of his item with a link to this Seinfeld clip.

Michael Gross Named Contributing Columnist for Crain’s New York Business

Michael Gross is joining Crain’s New York Business as a columnist, starting today. His column will appear every other week, and he’ll be covering a variety of subjects, including real estate, finance and politics.

Gross has written several best-selling books, and has contributed to The New York Times, New York magazine, Esquire, and Vanity Fair.

Xana Antunes, Editor of Crain’s New York Business, said of Gross, “We’re thrilled to offer Michael’s distinctive New York voice to our readers. He brings a refreshing perspective on the highs and lows of the city’s moneyed culture and never fails to call it as he sees it.”

His first column is about Arianna Huffington, and uses the fantastic headline “Big Swingin’ Chick.” And speaking of The Huffington Post, he fired back at David Carr – who wrote that HuffPo does nothing for writers – in a short post today.

What Titles Were You Sad To Lose In 2009?

gourmet.jpgIt hasn’t been the easiest year for print journalism. Crain’s New York Business reported Friday that 367 magazines have been axed in the last 12 months, with 64 going online-only, according to preliminary numbers from online database Mediafinder.com. (In October, Mediafinder said 383 had already closed up shop during the first nine months for the year).

According to The Business Insider, by July over 105 newspapers received similar treatment. Many more have had to scale back or go to an almost entirely digital format to survive.

In early October, Condé Nast took a particularly brutal hit with the shuttering of four titles: Gourmet, Cookie, Modern Bride, and Elegant Bride. And those closures came months after Condé folded Domino and Portfolio earlier in the year.

Still, it could have been worse…The New York Times is still around, despite some pessimistic predictions, right? So we here at FishbowlNY would like to hear from our readers: which closing affected you the most? Feel free to add your own to our list, and remember, we’re sticking to print publications (RIP Jossip.com) that disappeared in 2009, not including any that went online-only. And pass it along to your friends — we’ll be taking your answers into consideration next week, when we feature some year-end lists handpicked by the FishbowlNY editors. What can we say, it’s that time of year.


What print title will you miss the most?(trends)

Read More: 367 magazines shuttered in 2009Crain’s

Previously: Breaking: Condé Shutters Four Magazines: Cookie, Gourmet, Two Bridal Titles, Report: More Than 100 Magazines Shuttered In Last Three Months

Greg David Leaves Crain’s For Higher Education

greg.jpgTomorrow will be the last day for Crain’s New York Business‘ editorial director Greg David, who is leaving the pub after more than 33 years at Crain Communications.

David is leaving his full-time gig at Crain’s to become the director of the business and economics program at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. “I have been teaching there for three years and it is an exciting opportunity,” he said in an email today.

However, David said he will still write a weekly column in Crain’s print edition as well as a daily blog on the Web site, and “may do other editorial projects from time to time,” so he won’t be far from the pub. He’s also planning on making media appearances on WCBS Newsradio 880 and WNYC, giving speeches and moderating panels in addition to his duties at the journalism school.

During his long career at Crain’s, David spent 23 years as editor of the paper, joining just a few months after it started publishing in January 1985. In September 2008, the paper hired a new editor, Xana Antunes, and David moved into the role of editorial director. He previously worked for The Sarasota Herald Tribune and The Charlotte Observer.

Previously: Crain’s Hires New Editor, Previous Ed To Pen Book

Layoffs On The Horizon For Condé Nast?

4 times square.jpgWith McKinsey & Co. wrapping up its work at Condé Nast, the vultures are out. Severe budget cuts are a given, and layoffs are not too much of a stretch. The question is: which publications will be hardest hit?

Last week, we reported that publishers were likely going to be asked to cut their budgets by 25 percent. That same number has shown up in articles in Crain’s New York Business and The New York Observer.

According to Crain’s, publishers have already started meeting with the company’s Chief Operating Officer John Bellando, although the actual cutting may not start until October. Reports Crain’s:

“The meetings with Mr. Bellando, which began last week and are continuing through this week, are aimed at reducing budgets at each of the company’s titles by an average of 25 percent, sources say. The editors and publishers, who will be in charge of cutting from their respective departments, will have two to three weeks to submit their budgets for approval. Staff and spending cuts could soon follow.”

The Observer reports that leaders at Details, Condé Nast Traveler and Glamour have already had meetings where they have been asked to cut budgets by about 25 percent. Gourmet and Teen Vogue have also reportedly had similar meetings where they were asked to make the same cuts. However, as previously reported, The New Yorker is immune to these cuts, The Observer said.

There is one upside: neither of these insider reports mention any titles as being at risk for closure. If these reports are to be trusted, it looks like all of Condé Nast’s remaining titles could escape the chopping block. However, their staffers may not be as lucky.

Condé Nast execs expected to cut 25%Crain’s New York Business

McKinsey Proffers Pie Graphs: Several Condé Mags to Cut “25-ish Percent”The Observer

Earlier: Could Condé Nast Cut Budgets By 25 Percent?

Could Condé Nast Cut Budgets By 25 Percent?

VF.jpgWith McKinsey & Co. wrapping up its time at Condé Nast, the speculation has begun about how the magazine publisher will change its business in the coming months.

Today, Crain’s New York Business reports that editors and publishers have been asked to prepare for meetings to discuss next year’s budgets. They will likely be asked to cut budgets, perhaps by as much as 25 percent, the article said.

“The assumption behind the cuts is that advertising is not going to rebound any time soon,” observed reporter Matthew Flamm.

One Condé insider told Flamm that the company, “‘isn’t going to become like Hachette,’ referring to Hachette Filipacchi US, publisher of Elle and Woman’s Day, which is known to run a bare bones operation.”

Last week, The New York Observer‘s John Koblin predicted that the Condé Nast titles most in danger of being designated by McKinsey for “frequency reductions” are epicurean titles Gourmet and Bon Appetit and men’s mags GQ and Details.

Condé Nast execs to make big cuts, insiders sayCrain’s New York Business

Earlier: McKinsey Wraps Up At Condé Nast

Reuters Brings On Three New Columnists

reuters.pngReuters is filling out its commentary team by bringing on three new columnists — Agnes Crane, Matthew Goldstein and Christopher Swann.

Crane, formerly an editor at Dow Jones Newswires, led a team covering the credit markets and debt instruments.

Wall Street reporter Goldstein is joining Reuters from Businessweek, where he launched the magazine’s Unstructured Finance blog. He has also previously worked at TheStreet.com, SmartMoney.com, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Law Journal.

Swann previously covered the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the U.S. Treasury for Bloomberg News, and worked for the Financial Times for nine years before that.

The three columnists will be joining Reuters later this month and early next month.

Full release after the jump.

Earlier: Reuters Appoints International Commentary Editor

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