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Posts Tagged ‘D. J. Waldie’

Zocálo Square Op Ed Pans for Huell Howser ‘Darkness’

We’re not buying it. Even though D.J. Waldie knows the background subject matter of California’s history a lot better than we do.

In an essay posted today at Zocálo Square, Waldie argues that there was an increasingly deep, dark undertow coursing beneath the prolific reporting of retiring KCET/PBS show host Huell Howser. It’s definitely a different kind of media send-off:

Howser played one of the “folk” as larger than life and cannily for profit (at least until he stopped, for reasons that are his own for now), but the insinuating glee with which he took on California had more purposes than the standard con… I don’t know if the joy was a pose, too, like the piety of the minister who continues to preach after his faith is dead. But it’s hard for me not to see the subversion ever present in Howser’s joyous demeanor.

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In Praise of Loyola Marymount Journalism Students

KCET blogger D.J. Waldie gave a nice shout out the other day to Telling L.A.’s Stories, an ongoing city-view blog written by journalism students at Loyola Marymount University. The author-historian thinks there’s always room–alongside his TV station website’s various columns–for more City of Angels chronicling. Writes Waldie:

Their encounters with Los Angeles (and the problems of storytelling here) have the uneasy shock of first discovery. Their stories also have some of the rough edges expected of student writers. Their sympathies are not yet fully given, as they and the city continue a romance that could end badly.

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National Media Sees LA Dead People

Yesterday’s mass burial of the ashes of 1,689 unclaimed and unidentified people at the Los Angeles County Crematorium Cemetary is generating headlines and coverage across the country. As it should.

The notion that so many individuals, deceased through the end of 2007, would have no next-of-kin or way of being properly identified is spookier than any Hollywood horror film. One of the more interesting perspectives on Wednesday’s event comes courtesy of D.J. Waldie at KCET.org. He notes the history of the practice in LA and how full remains were once involved.

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Home Design Returns in LAT Sunday Magazine

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The Los Angeles Times Magazine, once known as West, returns on Sunday, and the theme is Home Design.

Home away from home, more accurately.

“Home Design” issue is devoted to “The Baja Plunge” and features a special report by senior style editor Barbara Thornburg on five Mexican beach homes purchased and decorated by Southern Californians at various price points with striking home and landscape photography by Joao Canziani.

Mexico City-based staff writer Reed Johnson travels deeper south into Baja California Sur to take the pulse of coastal Mexico’s next big boom spot and examines the costs, benefits and challenges of developing in the area.

Tips and ideas on how to get the Mexican beach house look without leaving town.

A trio of Baja getaways for food and wine enthusiasts with delicious off-the-beaten-track adventures.

The New York Observer had a special section included in the print edition, but not online, The Home Observer , edited by Tim Street-Porter and Annie Kelly. Included were a look at a new book by Diane Keaton and D. J. Waldie, California Romantica, and Wendy Goodman’s book, Tony Duquette. There’s also a look at Jonathan Adler’s beach house and design doyenne Marian McEvoy’s 18th century house in upstate NY. Try to scrounge one up, as it’s fabulous.