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Posts Tagged ‘Darhil Crooks’

The Atlantic Wins Magazine Cover of The Year

The voting is over, and the winner of the first FishbowlNY Magazine Cover of The Year is The Atlantic. It was a virtual tie between New York (who we thought would win) and its cover of a post-Sandy Manhattan and The Atlantic right up until the end. However, The Atlantic ended up with 41 percent of the vote, while New York grabbed 34 percent. Those two covers pretty much blew away the competition, as the next closest was ESPN The Magazine, with 9.9 percent of the vote.

Congrats to the Atlantic, and to Darhil Crooks, the magazine’s creative director. The winning cover was the first Atlantic issue with Crooks’ imprint, and it obviously made an impact on readers.

Thanks to everyone who voted in our poll. You are all — in your own special way — the wind beneath FishbowlNY’s wings.

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Darhil Crooks Discusses The Atlantic’s Evolving Look

Darhil Crooks, the creative director for The Atlantic, is just getting started. The November issue is the first to feature Crooks’ designs, but he told FishbowlNY that he has big plans for the title as he makes his imprint felt.

Crooks is highly respected in the magazine design world. During his time at Esquire the magazine received a nomination from the Society of Publication Designers for 2007 Magazine of the Year, and his revamp of Ebony — the first in its history — had readers excited about the brand. Now with The Atlantic, Crooks said it is time to up the ante.

“My main goal [for the magazine] is to step our game up visually by improving the way we present the ideas in the magazine and creating a more reader-friendly experience,” explained Crooks, via email. “I want The Atlantic to be bolder and riskier.”

Crooks has begun to change the Atlantic by altering its “features” presentation. He felt that the magazine placed too much emphasis on a template, and thus tended to downplay the significance of the issue’s longer pieces.

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Darhil Crooks Joins The Atlantic

Darhil Crooks has been named creative director of The Atlantic. Crooks comes to The Atlantic from Ebony, where he served as creative director since late last year. Prior to his time there, Crooks was creative director of Esquire from 2005 to 2010.

During his time at Ebony Crooks overhauled the magazine’s entire look for the first time; at Esquire the magazine received a nomination from the Society of Publication Designers for 2007 Magazine of the Year.

“Darhil’s imagination and passion for ideas-driven work make him the perfect creative force for The Atlantic,” Editor-in-Chief JamesBennet said. “It’s asking a lot to hope for vision, exacting standards, a delight in taking risks, and a collaborative spirit all in one person, and we feel very lucky to have found that.”

Crooks begins in early August.

Ebony Adds Darhil Crooks As Creative Director

Darhil Crooks has been appointed as the new creative director of Ebony magazine.  Editor-in-chief Amy DuBois made the move official yesterday and is eager to add Crooks’s experience to the magazine:

Darhil’s singular creative vision for the Ebony brand and his tremendous background working at best-in-class magazines will be of great value as we usher in a new era at the publication.

Crooks’s  move to Ebony comes after spending over five years as art director at Esquire and previous career stops at Men’s Journal and Complex magazine.  At Ebony, Crooks will manage the art department and make key decisions on page design and layout.  He will begin work on Jan. 3.