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Posts Tagged ‘David Folkenflik’

2014 Mirror Awards Finalists Announced

The finalists for the 2014 Mirror Awards — which celebrate the best in media reporting — have been announced. The winners will be announced June 4 at Cipriani on East 42nd Street.

Below are all the finalists. Congrats to everyone who was nominated.

Best Single Article – Traditional/Legacy Media

 Best Single Article – Digital Media

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Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Gabriel Sherman Talks Fox News and Roger Ailes at New America NYC

ShermanFolkenflik

“It’s not a company, it’s a cult around him,” said Gabriel Sherman, talking about Roger Ailes and Fox News to a packed room in Soho Tuesday night.

Sherman had come to New America NYC to discuss The Loudest Voice in the Room, his controversial book about Roger Ailes and how he created one of America’s most successful media empires. Ailes is a brilliant political consultant who built a news organization out of fear, said Sherman. And he argues that atmosphere informs Fox’s ethics and reporting at every level, from top anchors like Shep Smith to low level producers.

“They live in terror of him, but they hang on his every word,” he said. “People are terrified to speak his name or speak ill of him because they’re worried that the phones are tapped.”

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Fox News Staffers Posted Positive Comments on Critical Articles

Fox News has this Internet thing down to a science. A wily science, but a science nonetheless. David Folkenflik, the NPR media reporter, writes in his book Murdoch’s World that Fox News’ public relations staffers used an array of fake accounts to leave pro-Fox News comments on articles that criticized the network.

An excerpt from Folkenflik’s book, via Media Matters:

Fox PR staffers were expected to counter not just negative and even neutral blog postings but the anti-Fox comments beneath them. One former staffer recalled using twenty different aliases to post pro-Fox rants. Another had one hundred. Several employees had to acquire a cell phone thumb drive to provide a wireless broadband connection that could not be traced back to a Fox News or News Corp account. Another used an AOL dial-up connection, even in the age of widespread broadband access, on the rationale it would be harder to pinpoint its origins. Old laptops were distributed for these cyber operations. Even blogs with minor followings were reviewed to ensure no claim went unchecked.

Insane. Also sort of hilarious.

We always thought that FBNY commenters BillOReillyisaGreatManandSaysOnlyFacts22 and WMDs4Life seemed oddly in favor of Fox News. Now we know the truth.

Could the Koch Brothers Be Good For the Tribune Co. Newspapers?

Four days ago, The New York Times reported the billionaire Koch brothers are interested in buying the Tribune Company’s stable of newspapers, including The Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune, igniting fears from some in the media that the duo would use the paper’s to thump for their libertarian causes.

On Friday morning, NPR’s David Folkenflik talked to some former Tribune newspapermen who said, basically, so what?

“I think with the Koch brothers, people will probably look at it and say, ‘well, O.K., here are people with a lot of money, and maybe they’ll actually invest in the place and maybe they’ll have some ideas about how we diversify our revenue base and get away from this heavy, heavy, heavy reliance on advertising,” said James O’Shea, the former Chicago Tribune managing editor and Los Angeles Times editor. “I don’t think anybody’s going to object too much if the Koch Brothers buy the Chicago Tribune and [the paper] has a libertarian, kind of right-wing editorial page.”

Matt Welch, the editor of the libertarian Reason magazine and a former assistant editorial page editor at the Times added that the nation’s fourth-largest newspaper’s editorial board once helped propel the Republicans like Richard Nixon to office.

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Cable News Sites More Popular than Newspapers on the Web

As FishbowlNY noted yesterday, Yahoo! News is the most popular news website, according to recent data by the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism. But when you take out news aggregators, as comScore did, the result is some grim news for print: Cable News websites are pulling in higher numbers than print sites.

For the first three months of 2011, CNN was the most popular site, averaging nearly 8.5 million unique U.S. visitors each day. MSNBC came in second place with 7.4 million. New York Times, the best performing newspaper, ranked third on the ComScore list with an average 5.6 million.

Fox News, though the giant of cable, averaged 2.3 million. Nonetheless, it bested sites for the Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, the New York Daily News and USA Today.

David Folkenflik provides some explanation at NPR:

People associate breaking news with cable channels, said Rick Edmonds, who writes about the finances and business trends in the news industry for the Poynter Institute… “If you’re on CNN or MSNBC, you figure you’ll find out what’s going on within five minutes… With the others, there’s a feeling I’ll get a nice serving of stories that were produced this morning.”

Goodbye Glenn | Sweet Valley | Twitter Netiquette

  • TVNewser: NPR’s David Folkenflik calls Bret Baier “the next generation of Fox News anchor.” Are we over Glenn Beck so soon?
  • GalleyCat: Sweet Valley Confidential: Ten Years Later has hit the adult bestseller lists, causing rampant speculation over which YA series for girls will get the adult treatment next. We vote Anastasia over The Baby-Sitters Club. Discuss!
  • AllTwitter: Do not use social media under the influence, and other tips for Twitter netiquette.

Jay Rosen Says Journalists Should Be More Biased

It’s not often you find someone who thinks that the media should be more opinionated, but that’s just what Jay Rosen says in a piece by NPR’s David Folkenflik today.

Rosen thinks that journalists should disclose their biases because it would negate something he calls “the view from nowhere.” Folkenflik explains:

That phrase — ‘the view from nowhere’ — is what Rosen calls the media’s true ideology: not exactly on the right, and not exactly on the left. It is, he says, the way news organizations falsely advertise that they can be trusted because they don’t have any dog in the fight.

Most people already know that the media is biased [insert FishbowlNY Fox News joke #374 here] so Rosen makes a good point here. Why not just do away with all the posturing – like NBC scolding Keith Olbermann as if no one knew what his political leanings were already – and just tell it like it is? As Rosen says, the old method isn’t working anyway:

Removing all bias from their reports is something that professional journalists actually aren’t very good at. They shouldn’t say that they can do this, because it’s very clear to most of the people on the receiving end that they fail at this all the time.

Carr and Fox PR: Folkenflik on the Record

dfolkenflik.jpgIn the wake of the fallout over David Carr‘s piece on the Fox News PR machine our fellow mb blog PRNewser has managed to get NPR media reporter David Folkenflik — one of the few reporters to go on the record in the piece — on the record. Folkenflik, who was once described by Geraldo Rivera as “a really weak-kneed, backstabbing, sweaty-palmed reporter” (it’s in his NPR bio) had this to say:

As a general rule, I comment on the record whenever I have something relevant to say, or some informed perspective to offer. As a reporter, I ask people to speak on the record with me all the time…But because I’m being as faithful as I can to the truth, I’m not too concerned how it affects my relationship with Fox News, or any other organization I cover, for that matter. I can’t pull my punches simply because I anticipate it might make my workday a little less unpleasant.