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Posts Tagged ‘David Plotz’

Former Slate EIC Settles Into Atlas Obscura

AtlasObscuraLogoAre you old enough to remember Manhattan’s Museum of Famous People on West 50th Street, featuring dozens of vinyl mannequins? How about the apartment with a view that Gustave Eiffel built into the Eiffel Tower, recently re-opened for tourist view and featuring its own mannequin set of Eiffel and Thomas Edison? Have you visited that?

These two tidbits come from the rich content of website Atlas Obscura, where former Slate editor-in-chief David Plotz is now the chief executive. As he explained to the New York TimesLeslie Kaufman, his arrival in the fall followed a rather fanciful summer interlude:

Mr. Plotz made a list of more than 100 people to talk to. He included not only journalists, but also recruiters, financiers and people he found interesting, like Maria Popova, the author of the Brain Pickings blog on culture.

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David Plotz Joins Atlas Obscura

david plotz GDavid Plotz has made his first post-Slate move. He is the new CEO of AtlasObscura.com, a site that — as its name indicates — features content on the weirdest places around the globe. Atlas Obscura was founded in 2009 by Joshua Foer and Dylan Thuras.

According to Capital New York, Plotz — who resigned as editor of Slate in July — will spend the next few months raising money for the site because it’s still, well, obscure. Atlas Obscura will relaunch next year, with a staff of about 20.

Plotz’s ultimate goal for Atlas Obscura is not merely to spread the word that the site exists. “It can be for our generation and our children what National Geographic was for our parents,” he told Capital.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Rowe Sets Records for CNN | Morgan Slams Cooper, AC 360

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Mike Rowe Makes CNN History With Debut of Somebody’s Gotta Do It (TVNewser)
According to Nielsen Fast National Data, Mike Rowe‘s Somebody’s Gotta Do It is CNN Original Series’ best premiere ever in the adults 25-54 demo, averaging 507,000 viewers Wednesday night, coming in second to The Kelly File, which drew 544,000. THR / The Live Feed Somebody’s Gotta Do It marked a 255 percent advantage over MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show – which hit an all-time low during the third quarter. The series also averaged 943,000 total viewers, besting MSNBC by 25 percent. NYT Somebody’s Gotta Do It easily topped CNN‘s previous best result in its recent introduction of original series. The Hunt With John Walsh pulled in 330,000 viewers in the 25-54 group with its premiere in July. Deadline Hollywood Rowe’s opening represented a 152 percent hike in the news demo compared with the time slot’s average the prior four Wednesdays (201,000), and a 77 percent jump in overall crowd (534,000). CNNMoney Shows like Rowe’s — what CNN calls “original series,” distinguishing from newscasts or talk shows — cost more to produce than newscasts do, but tend to be more popular and can be replayed many times. They are a centerpiece of CNN Worldwide president Jeff Zucker’s strategy to improve the ratings performance of the company’s American cable channel. One of CNN’s first originals, Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, opened to 282,000 in the same age demographic back in April 2013.

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The Most Popular FishbowlNY Posts for The Week

Here’s a look at the FishbowlNY posts that made the most buzz this week.

LeBronSI1) Sports Illustrated Sets Web Traffic Record with LeBron James Essay

2) LeBron James Announces Cleveland Return Via Sports Illustrated

3) Newspaper Reporter Listed as ‘Endangered Job’

4) David Plotz Resigns as Editor of Slate

5) Oprah Will Send You a Birthday Card for $200

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Morning Media Newsfeed: World Cup Sets Ratings Records | Plotz Resigns From Slate

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World Cup Shatters Facebook Engagement Records (LostRemote)
The World Cup set single-event Facebook engagement records within the tournament’s first week. Now, with the tournament over, it is official: the 2014 World Cup is the most talked-about event in Facebook history. From June 12-July 13, 350 million people generated 3 billion World Cup-related interactions. AllFacebook These numbers make the 2014 World Cup the most-talked-about sporting event in the social network’s history. The tournament’s final match, which resulted in 280 million interactions from 88 million users, was the top sporting event in Facebook’s history. Capital New York All told, 26.5 million people watched the match Sunday via either ABC or Univision, making it the most-watched men’s World Cup final ever. ABC drew an average of 17.3 million viewers according to Nielsen Fast National ratings, the best numbers ever for a World Cup final, and the third best for any World Cup game. The two games that beat it were U.S.-Portugal from earlier in this year’s tournament (18.2 million viewers), and the 1999 Women’s final between the U.S. and China (17.9 million viewers). Deadline Hollywood Both ABC/ESPN and Univision had their best World Cup ever this year, with ESPN/ABC up 39 percent in viewership over the 2010 World Cup and up 96 percent over the 2006 World Cup. Over the 64 games of this year’s tournament, Univision was up 34 percent from its total audience from 2010. Variety The combined 26.5 million for Germany’s 1-0 victory is a larger audience than the deciding game for the most recent World Series on Fox (19.2 million) and NBA Finals on ABC (18.0 million), and also tops the BCS Championship game in college football on ESPN in January (25.6 million).

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David Plotz Resigns as Editor of Slate

David Plotz, who has been with Slate since the site launched in 1996, is stepping aside. Plotz had served as Slate’s editor since 2008. In a note, Plotz said he’ll remain an editor-at-large and continue to contribute to Slate’s Political Gabfest.

“But today, after 18 of the happiest, most satisfying years any journalist could ever have, I am stepping down as Slate’s editor,” wrote Plotz. “I’m not leaving for any secret reason. Maybe it’s the rule of six: Mike [Kinsley] edited Slate for six years. Jacob [Weisberg] edited Slate for six years. I’ve been editing Slate for six years, and I’m ready to try something new.”

Julia Turner will succeed Plotz as Slate’s editor.

[Image: Slate]

Slate Launches Paid Membership Plan

Slate Plus, the paid membership from Slate, is officially live. The first thing you should know about Slate Plus is that it’s not a paywall. The site will remain completely free. You won’t be asked to pay up once you read a certain number of articles. Slate Plus is — like the name suggests — Slate, but with more.

Readers can pay $5 a month or $50 a year for Slate Plus, which offers ad-free podcasts, non-paginated articles, an improved commenting system, access to Slate events and more.

We think Slate Plus is a great idea. It’s not going to alienate anyone who normally would read the site, like paywalls sometimes do. Instead, Slate is simply taking advantage of those who are open to paying for an upgraded experience.

“Are we asking you for money? Yes! We’re asking Slate Plus members to pay us $5 a month or $50 a year to gain access to a richer, smoother Slate experience,” wrote Slate’s editor, David Plotz. “We at Slate have always prided ourselves in experimenting with new kinds of journalism. It’s been equally important to us to experiment with new business models for journalism.”

Interested in Slate Plus? You can try it free for 14 days.

Slate Introduces Paid Membership Plan

There’s paywalls and metered paywalls, and then there’s Slate Plus, the new membership plan from Slate. The New York Times reports that Slate readers can subscribe to the plan — which will give them special access to the site’s writers, ad-free podcasts, and admission to live events — for $5 a month or $50 a year.

Slate Plus is unique in that the entire website will remain free. It’s a smart idea because Slate is keeping casual readers’ attention, but tempting their most dedicated fans with a paid product.

David Plotz, Slate’s editor-in-chief, said Slate Plus was a natural move for the site. “Advertising remains central to our success, but we think we’d be better off if we were less dependent on it,” he told the Times. “We also think it’s important to give readers a stake in the journalism they value, which is why we’re asking them to pay for membership.”

Slate Plus launches tomorrow.

Jack Shafer Edits Wisely

Jack Shafer GJack Shafer is currently a columnist at Reuters, but years ago, he was the editor of Washington City Paper. According to David Plotz, Slate’s editor, Shafer was quite blunt when it came to revisions.

Plotz told Digiday the following:

When I got my first journalism job at the Washington City Paper in 1993, I was not a good reporter and I was not a good writer. I turned in a long feature about a neighborhood fight over a power plant to the editor, Jack Shafer. Jack looked at the story, then ran a global search-and-replace on the document, swapping out every single ‘is’ and ‘are’ with the word ‘fuck.’ He told me: Don’t come back until you have replaced every fuck with an active verb. That was great advice for a young writer and reporter, and it made for one aggro story.

Words — or, word — to live by.

Slate Gets a Redesign

If you visit Slate today, you’ll notice that the site has undergone a massive revamp. Slate has discarded its old look that featured a carousel of big stories for a slew of articles organized by sections and writers. On the right readers can find the most recently published pieces. Images are larger and Slate now uses responsive design.

One of the goals of the update was to clean everything up. “Over the years a website can become encrusted with gunk: Modules and widgets and text links and boxes wedge their way into every corner of the site,” explained Slate’s editor, David Plotz, in a note about the changes. “We wanted to start over and try a cleaner approach that would make a Slate page feel like a calm oasis in the helter-skelter of the Web.”

The thing is, this new Slate feels more cluttered than ever. There are more articles to identify when you go to the homepage, and we found the way things were organized to be confusing.

On the bright side, we do love the way articles look; that’s definitely an upgrade. The headline stands out more and the font is much easier on the eyes.

Overall though, Slate’s new look somehow leaves us underwhelmed and overwhelmed at the same time.

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