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Posts Tagged ‘David Pogue’

Farhad Manjoo Leaves WSJ for NY Times

Farhad Manjoo GFarhad Manjoo is leaving The Wall Street Journal after only four months. He is headed to The New York Times to cover personal technology.

Manjoo will take over the “State of The Art” column, previously written by David Pogue. Pogue left the Times for Yahoo last October.

Manjoo joined the Journal in September after covering tech for Slate for five years.

“In his new role at the Times, Farhad will push ‘State of the Art’ beyond traditional reviews to examine the tech industry more broadly and the role technology plays across the board — what he calls ‘tech’s intrusion into society,’” wrote Dean Murphy, the Times’ business editor, in a note to staffers.

See below for the full note from Murphy and the Times’ technology editor, Suzanne Spector.

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David Pogue Leaves NY Times for Yahoo!

David Pogue, the veteran tech columnist for The New York Times, is leaving the paper for Yahoo. In a post on his Tumblr, Pogue explained that he would be creating a new consumer-tech site for the company.

“Actually, ‘site’ doesn’t even cover it,” wrote Pogue. “I’ll be writing columns and blog posts each week, of course, and making my goofy videos. But my team and I have much bigger plans, too, for all kinds of online and real-world creations.”

Pogue had been with the Times for the past 13 years. He notes that choosing to leave the paper was difficult, and he’ll always support it:

No matter what happens to prose on paper, the Times itself, as a gatherer and curator of news, will always be necessary and important. The culture may be changing, and the readership may be shifting, but this paper steadfastly focuses on responsible journalism, irconclad ethics and superb writing. I’ll always be a loyal ally.

Pogue will start at Yahoo! “in a few weeks.”

LeVar Burton Assembles Killer E-book Team

Fifteen months after indicating to New York Times columnist David Pogue at a Macworld event that he was raising money for a start-up, actor LeVar Burton is fully focused on the twain of education and enhanced children’s e-books. He tells Venture Beat that his company RRKidz has got $3 million in seed funding and is compiling a library of 300 iPad and Smartphone titles, with roughly 50 of those to be voiced by Burton himself.

The actor is partnered on the project with Buffalo’s WNED-TV, rights-holder to the 1983-2006 PBS series Reading Rainbow. He’s also put together a very impressive SoCal nucleus:

Burton’s Los Angeles-based team includes co-founder and chief strategy officer Mark Wolfe, who produced films such as Terminator 3 and Kinsey. The company’s chief executive is Asra Rasheed, an experienced digital media entrepreneur and previous co-founder of game rental service Gottaplay. The chief technology officer is Duc Haba, who previously worked at mobile analytics firm Motally. Sangita Patel is president of digital publishing and previous led business development initiatives at the Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones Ventures.

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New York Times Columnist David Pogue and Wife Charged with Disorderly Conduct

According to the Westport News, David Pogue – a tech writer for The New York Times - and his wife have been charged with disorderly conduct following a dispute at their home. Around 10:30 pm on Monday, the couple was given a summons for a fight that allegedly turned physical:

Case files in court say that Pogue and his wife were issued partial protective orders prohibiting them from assaulting, harassing or stalking each other.

And because life has an odd way of dealing with us when we’re down, today Pogue spoke at a benefit for a charity dedicated to domestic violence victims. Talk about cruel irony.

After the event, Pogue spoke to his hometown Westport News without realizing that the news of the charge had already broken:

When asked about the charges, Pogue said he had no comment. ‘I don’t think that’s appropriate for the forum,’ he said.

Yeah, it probably wouldn’t have been.

Friday’s RTCA Dinner Wrap Up|Meredith Titles Show Ad Growth In July|Gawker’s Denton Says He’s Not Bored|NYT‘s Pogue Takes Heat For Speaker’s Fee|Dumenco Continues Anti-HuffPo Campaign

FishbowlDC: Coverage of the Radio & Television Correspondent’s Association Dinner, including reviews of keynote speaker John Hodgman.

minOnline: Four of the top five magazines showing ad sales growth in July are Meredith titles: Fitness, Family Circle, Ladies’ Home Journal and More. Flex rounded out the top five.

Washington Post: Howard Kurtz interviews Gawker‘s Nick Denton. “We don’t seek to do good,” Denton said. “We may inadvertently do good. We may inadvertently commit journalism. That is not the institutional intention.” Also, is he truly bored? Said Denton via Twitter: “No, just British. It’s an affect — and we’re born with it.”

NYTPicker: After all the Thomas Friedman dust-up you think he would have known better. New York Times columnist David Pogue is getting flack for receiving a speaker’s fee for speaking at the Consumer Electronics Association’s CEO Summit last week.

AdAge: Simon Dumenco has an idea for a college course inspired by The Huffington Post: “Building Value by Devaluing Content: How to Make Your Investors Rich By Being Cheap, Trashy and Parasitic.”

Personal WiFi Comes to a Pocket Near You

mifi05.07.09.jpgAs a “professional blogger,” we spend far too much time wandering around looking for places with WiFi. (One can only spend so much time in one’s apartment before one goes nuts, especially when two stories are being added onto the roof of one’s building.)

Those days might be drawing to a close. The New York TimesDavid Pogue writes about MiFi, a new device that gives you wireless while sitting in your pocket. The takeaway:

Last week, I was stuck on a runway for two hours. As I merrily worked away online, complete with YouTube videos and file downloads, I became aware that my seatmate was sneaking glances. As I snuck counter-glances at him, I realized that he had no interest in what I was doing, but rather in the signal-strength icon on my laptop — on an airplane where there wasn’t otherwise any Wi-Fi signal. “I’m sorry,” he finally said, completely baffled, “but how are you getting a wireless signal?” He was floored when I pulled the MiFi from my pocket, its power light glowing evilly.

Where do we sign up?