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Posts Tagged ‘David Remnick’

Michael Bloomberg Won’t Buy The New York Times Because He Hates It

When Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post, a popular theory that emerged was Michael Bloomberg purchasing The New York Times (if it ever went up for sale). However, David Remnick, editor-in-chief of The New Yorker, says that’s not going to happen. Why? Because Bloomy hates the Times.

Remnick, appearing on This Week, explained “Mike Bloomberg is a great innovator, but I have to say, I’ve heard straight from the horse’s mouth that he detests the New York Times… Mike Bloomberg thinks that the New York Times has an opinion page on the front page and he loathes it.”

That probably settles that issue, but still, you have to wonder Bloomberg could end up buying the paper simply because he hates it so much.

If Bloomberg did, then he could change the Times to fit his vision. Which we imagine would feature plenty of articles praising Bloomberg.

A Lot of Media People Partied Last Night

The whirlwind surrounding the New Republic continued last night as Chris Hughes, editor-in-chief and publisher of the magazine, threw a party to celebrate the glossy. Since those in the publishing business love nothing more than to hobnob with people just like them, there was a slew of big names in attendance.

Now you might be saying “I don’t care about yet another event full of media people congratulating themselves for being themselves” but we know you do! Otherwise you wouldn’t be reading this. So allow us to give you what you want, a list of people who went to Hughes’ shindig, via The Huffington Post.

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The New Yorker Acquires The Borowitz Report

The New Yorker has acquired the satirical news site The Borowitz Report. The site, which is written by Andy Borowitz, is now housed at Newyorker.com. In announcing the move to the New Yorker, Borowitz says everything will stay the same, and that all topics are fair game, aside from one.

David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, has assured me that I can write whatever I want as long as I don’t make fun of Malcolm Gladwell,” explains Borowitz.

Borowitz’s first column is up this morning. It’s about Mitt Romney releasing the first picture of his running mate. The choice? Rich Uncle Pennybags, from the game Monopoly.

Jonah Lehrer’s Situation Gets Worse [Update]

Jonah Lehrer, formerly of Wired and recently hired by The New Yorker, is in serious trouble. Jim Romenesko pointed out that Lehrer lifted parts of a New Yorker piece from one he wrote for The Wall Street Journal, and the situation has snowballed since then. New York’s Daily Intel noted several other instances of Lehrer plagiarizing himself and now Edward Champion explains that Lehrer recycled material for his book, Imagine. Poynter also found that he lifted quotes from a story written by someone else:

An editor’s note at the foot of his excellent New Yorker piece on brainstorming says some Noam Chomsky quotes within it ‘were not made directly to Jonah Lehrer’ and that ‘Chomsky and his colleague were interviewed by Peter Dizikes for his article in the November/December issue of Technology Review.’ Gulp.

Gulp indeed. As of now, the only comment from the New Yorker is from its web editor, Nicholas Thompson, who called the plagiarizing “a mistake.” A slew of Lehrer’s posts on his “Frontal Cortex” blog also have editors notes tacked onto them. But how long until Lehrer gets the axe? He can’t possibly keep his job after all this, can he?

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The New Yorker Will Conquer the Digital Future and You Will Like It

The New Yorker is quite pleased with its digital operations, and its editors aren’t shy about telling everyone. David Remnick, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, appeared on CBS This Morning and when the subject of paywalls came up, Remnick got testy. “Look, you cannot get these stories for free,” he explained. “I cannot give you everything on the Internet for free and make you think The New Yorker is something that comes out of the faucet.” Agreed!

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Vanity Fair Memorializes Christopher Hitchens

On Friday afternoon, Vanity Fair and a slew of guests gathered to celebrate the late and great Christopher Hitchens. According to WWD, a few of those in attendance included Graydon CarterAnna Wintour, Salman Rushdie, Sean Penn, David Remnick, Tina Brown, Stephen Fry and Steve Kroft.

Excerpts from Hitchens’ works were read by many, but Fry probably had the quote of the afternoon. According to Fry, Hitchens thought that “The four most overrated things in life are Champagne, lobster, anal sex and picnics.” Fry then added, “Three out of four isn’t bad.”

For more about the celebration, click through.

David Remnick Cheers for Obama

It’s no secret that David Remnick, the Editor-in-Chief of The New Yorker, is a big Barack Obama fan, but it’s still fun to hear what he has to say about our commander in chief. Capital New York reports that Remnick and a panel of authors were discussing Obama’s tenure and Remnick had plenty to say.

The editor said that Obama’s achievements have been “remarkable,” defended the “fist-bump” New Yorker cover of Obama and his wife, and offered a realistic portrait of the president:

‘Barack Obama is radical in one way: he’s an African American who won the presidency. After that, he’s kind of a center-left, conventional Democratic Party rendering. I mean, he’s intellectually a lot more than that, he’s a lot more interesting. He’s certainly a lot more literary. There’s more dimensions to him as a personality both historically and personally. But, in terms of policy, in terms of the policy of the possible, in terms of the policy of his own ambitions, he is no radical.

Aside from praising Obama, Remnick opened up about his feelings toward Mitt Romney when someone asked about him. “In my life, I’ve never seen a vessel so empty of precisely what you’re asking about, which is principle,” said Remnick. Surely Obama will appreciate that.

Gossip From The Condé Nast Holiday Luncheon

The first thing you need to understand when discussing the Condé Nast luncheon yesterday is that it was just a lunch. Luncheon is just a rich person word for lunch. With that out of the way, let’s get to some of the more notable moments from the meal at the Four Seasons.

The New York Post reports that everyone was in pretty good spirits. Charles Townsend, the CEO of Condé, said, “We had a very good year — up in high single digits,” and said the company’s digital business was doing well.  Si Newhouse was sitting at a table with Scott Dadich, David RemnickBrandon Holley and a few others. This seating arrangement can mean something or nothing. Feel free to pick one and spread those thoughts to everyone you know.

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The New Yorker’s Bin Laden Story Comes Under Fire

In the last issue of The New Yorker, a piece detailing the raid of Osama bin Laden’s compound received rave reviews – at least at first. The article, by Nicholas Schmidle, is by far the most thorough account of the raid as it includes many details about the Navy SEALs team, down to what some of them were wearing. We love the piece, but apparently not everyone feels that way.

The problem – according to critics like Paul Farhi at The Washington Post – is that Schmidle doesn’t explicitly state that he didn’t interview any SEAL directly; instead he relied on interviews with officials who had debriefed the men. But that seems to be nitpicking. There are no direct quotes from the SEALS, so why would anyone think that they were interviewed? David Remnick, Editor-in-Chief at The New Yorker, told WWD via email that the people who were interviewed was pretty clear:

The piece does not say that Nick interviewed the SEALs. In all, he interviewed officials with direct access both in the military, intelligence and in the White House; some of those officials are quoted by name, some not – hardly unusual. All of these sources were known to Nick’s editors and spoke extensively with two experienced New Yorker fact-checkers.

We find it hard to believe that a magazine as good as The New Yorker would go through with publishing Schmidle’s piece without knowing that it was quality work. The article is a great read, and the criticism coming from others is a stretch. A jealous stretch if you ask us.

Artist Holding Hunger Strike Over New Yorker Article

This is great. John Perry, a painter who was portrayed in a New Yorker article as stalking the actor John Lurie, is in day 17 of a hunger strike regarding the article. He says the magazine shouldn’t have published it (uh, in August of 2010, by the way) and won’t eat until a correction is issued.

David Remnick, Editor-in-Chief of The New Yorker, told The New York Post that he’s not going to give in:

The piece was thoroughly reported and fact-checked, and is a fair representation of both sides of the story. We looked into [Perry's] complaints carefully and found nothing to correct or retract. As concerned as we are about his health, we can’t print something we don’t believe is true.

Not only is Perry not eating, he’s also going to Lurie’s house and sitting outside for about eight hours a day. So yes, he’s protesting being portrayed as a stalker by acting like a stalker.

(hat tip to Daily Intel)

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