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Posts Tagged ‘David Remnick’

Blake Lively, Charlie Rose And An Ex-Caped Crusader

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— DIANE CLEHANE

I just love it when the random celebrity turns up at Michael’s for lunch. It’s always entertaining to watch the usual suspects try to simultaneously network and star gaze. Today’s out-of-left-field appearances represented both new and old Hollywood (just like this year’s Oscars but without James Franco‘s near comatose involvement). For fans of eighties screen gems like the original Batman and Beetlejuice, there was Michael Keaton. The younger demographic was represented by Gossip Girl star Blake Lively, who, it should be said, is even more beautiful (and taller) in person.

There was plenty of Tinseltown talk at my table, too. I was lunching today with producer Joan Gelman and marketing consultant and political commentator Robert Zimmerman, who is keeping busy with appearances on CNN and Fox News. Joan, who has more than paid her dues in television, had this to say about the Oscars: “You need a heavyweight to carry that show. You need a comedian who can make the audience laugh. It was a horribly produced show.”

Maybe so, but we all agreed that Bravo’s Andy Cohen was way out of line to trash the performance of the school kids from Staten Island who closed out the show by singing “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” Appearing on Morning Joe, Cohen told the incredulous hosts that the kids’ performance (which got a standing ovation from the audience) “ruined everything” and that he was so pained by the sight of kids in t-shirts (evidently, he thought they should have dressed up) that he was “looking for a knife to stick in his eyes.”

To that, Robert asked, “The man who is responsible for such high-brow television as The Real Housewives franchise is suddenly the arbiter of good taste and glamour in Hollywood?” Don’t expect an apology anytime soon, either. In the current media climate, said Robert, it’s more than likely Cohen is relishing the attention he’s getting for taking aim at the elementary schoolers. “Creating buzz is more relevant than making sense.” Apparently so.

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. Hollywood heavyweight Freddie Gershon (Loved the sweater!) with Linda Janklow

2. Spotted: Blake Lively and Vivi Nevo. When this unlikely duo showed up without a reservation, things got a lot more interesting. (One pesky paparazzo seemingly transfixed by the sight of the actress stationed himself outside of the window overlooking the dining room for the entire lunch and refused to move no matter how many times he was asked to leave) We’re more intrigued by Vivi, who, we hear is an Israeli-born venture capitalist and was once engaged to the Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi. Could this be the start of another Hollywood romance? Maybe he’s just interested in fashionable folk. After all, the last time we spotted him at Michael’s he was sitting at this very table with Anna Wintour.

3. A trio of social swans: Margo McNabb Nederlander and producers Terry Allen Kramer and Francine LeFrak.

4.  Charlie Rose (who we overheard introducing himself to Michael Keaton) and Universal Pictures CEO Stacey Snider

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Filkins heads to The New Yorker

Dexter Filkins, Middle East correspondent for The New York Times, is leaving for a similar position at The New Yorker. According to WWD, Filkins will not be limited to just that area of the globe. David Remnick, editor at The New Yorker, says in the report, “I’m sure that he will get his fill of Afghanistan and Pakistan, but I’d also be very surprised if he didn’t travel far and wide—whether that’s the Middle East or Africa or India.”

Filkins will report to features director Daniel Zalewski.

Katherine Stirling Is Vanity Fair‘s Articles Editor

Here’s a name to get to know: Katherine Stirling. After a stint as David Remnick‘s assistant and a brief time working with Deborah Needleman at WSJ, Stirling is now Vanity Fair‘s articles editor.

And, according to WWD, the fact that Stirling is but 28 has seemed to work in her favor, with Graydon Carter noting that he was impressed by her “youth and clear intelligence.”

Dan Rather On Journalism|Mags Go Up In Price|New Yorker Dumps Second Fiction Issue|UMD’s Knight Center Closes|Buffett Calls Newspaper Publishers Complacent

TVNewser: An exclusive interview with Dan Rather, part of mediabistro.com’s new Media Beat video series.

Mediaweek: As the print magazine industry continues to struggle, some publishers plan to raise cover prices on a number of titles in the new year.

WWD: The New Yorker is replacing its second fiction issue of the year with a new “world changers” themed issue, on newsstands this week. “I think one is enough for the time being,” editor David Remnick said of the magazine’s fiction issues.

Philip Merrill College of Journalism: The Knight Center for Specialized Journalism at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland will close at the end of the month. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, which supports other journalism training programs at other universities around the country, helped found the center 22 years ago.

Editor & Publisher: Billionaire Warren Buffet, who owns The Buffalo News, says the newspaper industry has gotten too complacent and has relied on an outdated business model for too long. “When the Internet came along, you gave away your [online] product for free and charged for it in another place [print],” he said. “I’m not positive what you would have done differently, but not figuring out some kind of business model was a mistake.”

Check Out The New Yorker‘s Masthead

new yorker cover.jpgCondé Nast weekly The New Yorker doesn’t publish a masthead, so its staff, titles and editorial structure is sort of a well-kept secret. And, it’s one of the few Condé pubs to mostly survive the massive staff cuts that hit the magazine publisher recently. We admit to more than a little curiosity about what that masthead might look like these days.

Being curious himself, The New York Observer‘s John Koblin has done the legwork and put together a masthead for the venerable pub. It’s a hefty list, which includes more than 60 staff writers — although Koblin is quick to point out “that because of the unique, internal logic of the magazine, job titles are a strange thing — someone who may be a staff writer may have only contributed a single piece in the last few years.”

As New Yorker editor-in-chief David Remnick explained to Koblin:

“If The New Yorker is going to be worthy of the name and achieve a level of prose or accuracy or depth, or if it’s going to give the reporters or writers the time they need to achieve what I hope we can achieve, we can’t do it with a minuscule staff.”

See the full masthead: The Last Magazine Standing

Related: More Cuts At Condé?

Joanne Lipman: A New Prototype of Feminism in Journalism?

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One year ago, Portfolio was on its last legs. After the market saw the biggest plummet in decades, the cover of the business magazine had American Apparel founder Dov Charney on the cover: A misstep for the magazines that some say it never recovered from. The waiting game of Portfolio‘s cut from the Conde Nast empire wasn’t long, and many blamed editor-in-chief Joanne Lipman for the bad turns the title had taken.

Six months later, Lipman is back, in a New York Times weekend editorial, talking about feminism and inequality in the workplace, which some groups have read as her bitter grapes towards Si Newhouse for killing off Portfolio. But her argument is more than just sarcasm towards a former boss: If you don’t think there are still issues of gender divided in the newsroom bullpen, then maybe you should go back and read some Nan Robertson.

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Norman Mailer Colony Gala: A Night of Media, Literary Superstars

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It takes a lot to bring America’s greatest living fiction, non-fiction, and journalism writers into one room, but if one woman could do, it’s Tina Brown. The Daily Beast editor-in-chief hosted the first ever Norman Mailer Colony soiree at Cipriani last night, to celebrate the non-profit in which promising young writers get to live in Norman Mailer’s house in Massachusetts for a week to a month.

Guests included Salman Rushdie, Joan Didion, Richard Goodwin, Michael Cunningham, Jeffrey Eugenides, Annie Leibovitz, New Yorker editor-in-chief David Remnick and master of ceremonies, Calvin Trillin.

Among the revelers were also editors and writers from The Nation, Budget Travel, The New Yorker, The New York Times and The Week.

A few pictures from the night after the jump.

Earlier: Norman Mailer Writers Colony To Honor Toni Morrison, David Halberstam

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Norman Mailer Writers Colony To Honor Toni Morrison, David Halberstam

mailer award.jpgNext week, the Norman Mailer Writers Colony will throw its first gala hosted by New York media bigwigs Tina Brown and New Yorker editor-in-chief David Remnick.

The gala, emceed by Nation columnist Calvin Trillin, will be held at Cipriani on Tuesday night and will also serve as an awards dinner honoring Toni Morrison with a Lifetime Achievement Award and posthumously bestowing the Distinguished Journalism Prize to David Halberstam. The first Norman Mailer National High School Nonfiction Writing Award and Norman Mailer College Nonfiction Writing Award will also be given out that night.

The writers colony is a nonprofit organization founded earlier this year, located at the home of the late author and Village Voice founder in Provincetown, Mass. It aims to help nurture writers in the spirit of Mailer, who passed away in November 2007 at the age of 84. The organization is billing this year’s gala as the “first annual,” presuming there will be more to come.

The group is also promising that boldfaced names like Joan Didion, Pete Hamill, Jhumpa Lahiri, Salman Rushdie, Gay Talese, designer Diane von Furstenberg and director John Waters will be in attendance, so you know we’ll be there covering the event.

Related: RIP, Norman Mailer

Nikki Finke Blasts New Yorker Profile

 deadline logo.jpgYesterday, The New Yorker published a lengthy profile of Deadline Hollywood Daily blogger Nikki Finke.

The article — which name-checks some of the biggest players in Hollywood, muses on Finke’s possible sources, describes her home office and even gets the woman of the hour on the record — is woven through with an interesting discourse about the state of journalism and reporting on Hollywood in the Internet age and Finke’s own method:

“Finke’s code is the Hollywood code. She is for hard work, big box-office, stars who remain loyal to their agents and publicists, and the little guy — until, that is, the big guy chats her up. Then she’s for that big guy until some other big guy calls to stick it to the first big guy. And this, too, is the Hollywood code: relationships are paramount but provisional. One executive observes that people who heed Finke’s call to snark about their competitors shouldn’t get too comfortable: ‘The idea is, The lion won’t eat me if I throw it another Christian. It works for a day, but you’re going back to the Colosseum soon.’”

Almost immediately, Finke posted her take on the article: a blistering take-down of the New Yorker, pointing out that the piece “didn’t lay a glove on me.” Finke said writer Tad Friend was “easy to manipulate,” and claimed she bitchslapped editor-in-chief David Remnick, “especially during the very slipshod factchecking process.” She had made the venerable magazine her “buttboy” — a favorite phrase of hers.

The article is also missing some key information on Deadline Hollywood Daily, such as how much Finke is said to have received when she sold her site to Jay Penske‘s Mail.com Media Corp. earlier this year or recent plans to expand the site. All Things Digital’s Peter Kafka is on the case, asking questions about why Finke has still has not named a New York correspondent she had planned to appoint around the end of the summer:

“For the record, in late June, Finke said she’d have a New York correspondent hired within three months; four weeks ago, Penske told me said correspondent was going to be signed within two weeks. What’s the status now? ‘Not ready to comment right now,’ Finke says via email.”

We’re getting restless waiting to see who Finke will chose to lead her East Coast division. There’s certainly no one who could match her brutal style and flippant attitude. But we’d like to see them try.

Call MeThe New Yorker

Hollywood Manipulated The New Yorker –Deadline Hollywood Daily

First On FBNY: More Cuts At Condé? (With Updates)

new yorker.pngA FishbowlNY tipster tells us there were layoffs at The New Yorker yesterday, the same day the New York Observer featured a story hinting that the magazine would be spared from the Condé Nast cuts.

“Two well-placed sources said that Condé Nast’s chairman, Si Newhouse, reached out to [New Yorker editor David] Remnick shortly after the McKinsey announcement was made and told him not to worry about anything — the magazine would be just fine, and neither McKinsey nor company executives would be mucking with his editorial costs,” the Observer‘s John Koblin reported.

FBNY has reached out to New Yorker‘s publicists, and we’ll keep you posted.
UPDATE: A New Yorker publicist has confirmed to FBNY that three of the magazine’s staffers on the business side were let go yesterday.

After doing some more digging, we have heard that the cuts were not McKinsey related. People at the New Yorker are maintaining the party line that Koblin referred to in his article: the editorial budget for the New Yorker will most likely remain untouched throughout the McKinsey process.

However, Koblin may have gotten one thing wrong: we’ve heard that Graydon Carter frequently eats in the cafeteria at 4 Times Square, and has for years.

Heard anything? Send us an email, leave an anonymous tip or a comment if you have any information.

Related: Mourning The Loss Of Condé Nast’s “Gilded Age”

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