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Posts Tagged ‘Deborah Needleman’

NY Times to Wait on Naming Editor for NY Times Magazine

Ever since we learned that The New York Times Magazine’s editor-in-chief, Hugo Lindgren, was leaving at the end of the year, we’ve been wondering — who will succeed him? According to a note from the Times’ executive editor, Jill Abramson, it will be… Well, she’s not sure yet.

Abramson explained that for the next three months, Dean Baquet, the Times’ managing editor, and Deborah Needleman, editor of T Magazine, will “plunge into the challenges facing the magazine.” The challenges Abramson listed:

There are urgent issues and questions: how to make the magazine the fount of our richest, most immersive multimedia reading; which long reads belong in the A book and which might fare better with editing and presentation in the magazine; should there be more dedicated staff writers, how do we forge stronger relationships with the best of our freelancers in an ever more competitive environment?

Abramson said that by appointing Baquet and Needleman to lead the magazine, “It allows us to hit the pause button and think in a more disciplined way about where we want the magazine to go. Then will come the moment to appoint a new editor to lead the way.”

The full note from Abramson is below.

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Domino to Relaunch as Quarterly Publication and E-Commerce Site

Domino, the decor magazine that Condé Nast folded in 2009, is staging a comeback. According to WWD, Project Décor — a social media platform for design fans — is relaunching the magazine as a quarterly print publication and e-commerce site. Condé will retain an ownership stake in the brand.

The revamped Domino is expected to debut this fall, which should make readers of the defunct publication excited. Especially if it returns to its old form.

The good news on that end is that Beth Brenner, the original publisher of the magazine, is taking on a role. However, we would suggest that you don’t hold your breath for Deborah Needleman, Domino’s founding editor, to return. She’s editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Magazine, which we hear is a pretty good gig.

John Sykes, Tommy Hilfiger and a Real-Life Warrior Princess

1003_mockup.gifAs the faithful readers of this column already know, lunch at Michael’s is never really just about lunch, but it is (usually) a lot of fun. And today was no exception. I was invited to join a ‘girl’s lunch’ for author Mindy Budgor hosted by Jolie Hunt, AOL’s former chief marketing officer. Jolie, who knows practically everyone in New York, told me she decided to get a group of women together for Mindy, who recently moved here from Chicago, and “pop her Michael’s cherry.” Alrighty then. When Mindy asked if she knew “any interesting women in New York,” Jolie sprung into action and gathered The Wall Street Journal‘s media editor Keach HageyKyle Gibson, executive producer of Newsweek The Daily Beast‘s Women in the World; Deborah Needleman, editor of The New Yorks Times T magazine; recently departed Lucky EIC Brandon HolleySara Nelson, Amazon editorial director of books and Kindle, Wenda Harris Millard and yours truly to dine and dish at Table One. Mindy brought along former Today show senior producer-turned-media trainer Amy Rosenblum and Andrea Lustig, author and contributing editor for Glamour.

I chatted (OTR, sorry) with newlywed Sara Nelson (Congrats!) and Brandon Holley before we sat down for lunch. Uber chic Brandon, who I first met during her days at Yahoo! Shine, told me she’s planning to spend the summer with her family in Montauk. I can’t say I blame her. When the rest of the gang arrived we sat in rapt attention as guest of honor Mindy told the story behind her new book, Warrior Princess, My Quest to Become the First Female Maasai Warrior (Allen & Unwin). I hadn’t known what to expect when Jolie told me she was hosting this gathering for her friend who was — really — the first ever female Maasai warrior. I certainly didn’t expect her to be the sweet 30-year-old woman sporting a Bulgari pendant I mistook for some tribal gem who regaled the group of tales of slaughtering goats and cows and drinking their blood (so much for my appetite.)

Jolie Hunt, Mindy Budgor and Diane Clehane

It turns out a woman’s magazine has an exclusive on Mindy’s story — the details are very hush-hush — so I’m not allowed to share the jaw-dropping tale she told us over lunch. Before I was advised of the embargo, I asked why this self-described “nice, Jewish girl” decided to quit her job in Chicago and go off to Kenya, and she told me, “I felt my values were out of whack.”

I’m sworn to secrecy on the rest of her story (a first at Michael’s, I know), but I can share what’s on Mindy’s own website. The Santa Barbara native bought a ticket to Kenya and set off to volunteer building schools and hospitals in the Maasai Mara. While she was there, she asked the chief why there were no female warriors. After being told that women “are not strong enough or brave enough,” Mindy and her fellow volunteer, Becca, knew what they had to do. Her journey from bored MBA student to fearless female warrior is definitely inspiring. No doubt there’s plenty of lessons in the book (and some interesting photos from her time in Kenya) for those of us trying to survive in the concrete jungle. I’m starting Warrior Princess tonight.  Read more

New York Times Says Fashion Photos Can Be Altered

Some drama occurred recently when Deborah Needleman, editor of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, said she considered adding some fat to a cover model she thought was too thin. Naturally some people were outraged, because they apparently have never picked up a magazine. Margaret Sullivan, the Times’ public editor, followed up on the situation, and found that the Times holds fashion photos to a different standard than news photos.

Michele McNally, the Times’ assistant managing editor for photography, explained, “Fashion is fantasy. Readers understand this. It’s totally manipulated, with everything done for aesthetics.” Philip Corbett, associate managing editor for standards, added, “This is a different genre of photography [than news]. It has different goals, different tools and techniques, and there is a different expectation on the part of the reader.”

In other words: Don’t be an idiot. Of course fashion photos are altered. If you’re upset by this, consider taking photos meant to sell material goods a little less seriously.

Deborah Needleman is Sorry There’s So Many White People in T

The first T: The New York Times Style Magazine under the guidance of Deborah Needleman hit newsstands this past Sunday. While the new T was packed with content and ads (the issue was so massive we considered doing bicep curls with it), something else stuck out to readers: The models featured were pretty much all white.

To her credit, Needleman realized and regretted the overwhelming whiteness found within T’s pages. In a response to the Times’ public editor, she pledged to correct the discrepancy going forward:

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T: The New York Style Magazine Gets a New Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first T: The New York Times Style Magazine under the guidance of Deborah Needleman debuts February 17, and with it, a new logo. So what do we think? New T or old T (pictured, right)? We sort of prefer the old T.

Kate Lanphear Joins T: The New York Times Style Magazine

Deborah Needleman continues to reshape T: The New York Times Magazine. Her latest hire is Kate Lanphear, who has been named the magazine’s new style director.

T’s Twitter account confirmed the news of Lanphear’s arrival via a tweet from fashion journalist Jim Shi. ”Kate Lanphear has joined T: The New York Times Style Magazine as style director,” tweeted Shi. “She’ll be at the upcoming women’s shows with Team T.”

Lanphear was most recently with Elle, where she also served as style director since 2008.

T: The New York Times Style Magazine Hires Stylist Joe McKenna

Joe McKenna is coming aboard T: The New York Times Style Magazine as its fashion editor at large. According to WWD, McKenna will be based in London where he lives, but work on several spreads per year.

McKenna is a veteran of the fashion world, getting his start in 1986. His work has been featured in Vogue, Vanity Fair, W and more.

It is expected that McKenna will have a large role in T’s February issue, which will be the first under Deborah Needleman.

Kristina O’Neill Named Editor of WSJ.

Kristina O’Neill has been named the new editor-in-chief of WSJ. magazine. O’Neill most recently served as executive editor of Harper’s Bazaar, where she had been since 2000. O’Neill succeeds Deborah Needleman, who left WSJ. to edit T: The New York Times Style Magazine.

“The appointment of Kristina, one of America’s most talented editors, marks a new phase of the exponential evolution of WSJ.,” said Robert Thomson, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones & Company and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, in a statement. “We are increasing the frequency and expanding global reach in the coming year with our winning mix of intelligent writing and visual virtuosity — gloss without dross is our magazine mantra.”

O’Neill will report to Ruth Altchek, who, in a related move, has been named editorial director for WSJ Weekend, a new role at the Journal. She will now oversee the “Off Duty” section and WSJ. magazine.

O’Neill’s appointment is effective October 29.

Deborah Needleman Sparks Twitter Rage

Newly appointed T: The New York Times Style Magazine editor Deborah Needleman just learned the hard way to think before you tweet. Needleman, who left the WSJ for the NYT last month, was plugging an appearance by Katie Roiphe, when things went horribly wrong:

Naturally women — and some men — didn’t appreciate Needleman seemingly perpetuating a stereotype about feminists, so they jumped on her; none faster than Emily Nussbaum, of The New Yorker:

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