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Posts Tagged ‘Derek Thompson’

Morning Media Newsfeed: NYT Unveils Redesign | MSNBC to Rotate Noon Cast | Thompson In, Klein Out?

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New York Times Redesign Points to Future of Online Publishing (CNNMoney)
The last time The New York Times embarked on a wholesale redesign of its website, in 2006, the iPhone wasn’t on the market. Tablets like the iPad were still years away. So the new design that the Times unveiled Wednesday is generating much interest within the journalism industry, both for what it says about the Times and about the future of online publishing. Mashable There are no drastic changes. Gone are the blue headlines and the lengthy sidebar in favor of a grayer digital lady with more white space. But the site feels more like The New York Times than NYTimes.com. “We’re leaning more heavily on the site to maintain our identity,” says Ian Adelman, the director of digital design for the Times. Capital New York It will take a while for the redesign to settle with critics, but judged by the usual Day One tests, it’s a success: It was delivered on time, and to us seems relatively bug-free. But the process, which took two years and the work of 40 people round the clock (and 80 people all together over the life of the project), wasn’t easy. NYT / Public Editor’s Journal Many readers and outside commentators called the redesign cleaner and easier to navigate. One reader, Larry Hollon, wrote to me, in part: “The new digital format is fantastic. It’s clean, easy to read, lots of white space and it organizes information in a way that is very accessible. Thank the appropriate designers. It’s great.” Still, not everyone was happy. Slate / CultureBox No doubt a large reason for the collective shrug at the Times redesign is the fact that little has changed that affects our strategies of consumption. The Times’ editors still signal what they judge most important through the front page, which remains three columns of text with a big picture. Gone, finally, are the blue-hued headlines, which at this point were so outdated they’d nearly traveled past obsolete to retro-chic, a living monument to the Web of Yore, when primitive browsers would not click anything that wasn’t blue. Now, headlines look as they do in the Times’ print edition.

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Thanks to Drudge N-Word Headline, THR Wednesday Web Traffic Was Off the Chain

The “D” in Drudge Report was anything but silent this past Wednesday for The Hollywood Reporter. As Max Read on Gawker, Derek Thompson of The Atlantic and other media watchers noted, Drudge went crazy with a 40-point, multiple N-word headline pointing to Todd McCarthy‘s Django Unchained review.

Having here at FishbowlLA had a brush or two with the dynamite known as a Drudge mention, we were curious how much traffic – exactly - the item in question received December 12. A spokesperson for THR tells us McCarthy’s Django review registered an astounding 1,000,137 page views.

Drudge often links to McCarthy THR critiques, and not every one of those Wednesday clicks came from his site. But for McCarthy to cross the single-day one million mark a day before being co-opted for an Onion item about The Hobbit, well that’s too cool even for Quentin Tarantino school.

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What People Are Saying About Newsweek Ending Print Edition

As you know, Newsweek has decided to end its print edition. We’re sad about it, but not everyone is. Below is a sampling of what people are saying about an icon going dark.

Howard Fineman, The Huffington Post:

I tweeted earlier today that I was going to be “ruminating” about the death of Newsweek and someone suggested that I ‘ruminate’ instead on the decline of ”News with a capital ‘N.”Well I have, and I don’t believe for a minute that one equals the other. We want to do excellent reporting and writing; the best way to honor a place such as Newsweek is to seek to match what it did in both.

Kevin Lincoln, BuzzFeed:

Critics suggested that Brown had lost her touch, but in fact the game had changed, and she was trying to do the impossible. Brown realized that the media ecosystem favored viral images, and her covers spread on blogs and the social web. But they failed to carry the cover stories, or the magazine, with them.

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Critics Respond To Times‘ Pay Wall Plans

425825719_3bf95d6e86.jpgHow long have we been living under the looming shadow that is the threat of a New York Times‘ pay wall? The answer most likely is since TimesSelect’s fall in 2007, after the paper’s first attempt at getting online readers to pay for content.

Since then, publisher Arthur Sulzberger has made vague promises, culminating in today’s announcement of a plan to launch a metered pay model on NYTimes.com next year. It makes sense: last year saw the Times‘ hemorrhaging money (losing $35 million in the third quarter alone), and speculation that the paper wouldn’t make it to 2010.

Thankfully, Carlos Slim stepped in last year, but it still remains to be seen how the Grey Lady will make it back into the black. While alienating some readers, the metered system of content-charging that Sulzberger is planning may actually be the best compromise between giving away your product for free and going on almost total lock-down mode like the The Wall Street Journal. Under this plan, The New York Times will eventually allow you to read only a certain number of articles per month before asking you to subscribe, much like Variety or The Financial Times (although some have pointed out that the FT‘s model is looking more and more like the Journal‘s).

But even before today’s not completely unexpected announcement, media critics were chomping at the bit to react to the Times‘ possible pay plans. After the jump, a look at what some of them are saying.

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