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Posts Tagged ‘Digital’

Showcase Your Writing Skills at This Freelancer-Friendly Digital Mag

TheMagazineThe Magazine, the iOS-native pub, is looking for writers. The mag, which is 100 percent freelance written, focuses on an array of “stuff that people with [a geeky mind] find interesting,” said executive editor Glenn Fleishman.

According to Fleishman, the content of the pub skirts somewhere between Wired and The New Yorker, and the editors make an effort to be nice to freelancers:

Though the freelance life is filled with perks (flexible hours, being your own boss, etc.), it’s a career that’s tougher than it looks. Late payments (or lack of payments!), chasing down editors, crafting pitches only to never hear back from publications — these are routine travails that freelancers must deal with. Which is why when Mediabistro spoke to the editors of The Magazine, we were shocked for a few reasons: 1) The editors pride themselves on responding to each and every pitch; 2) If they like your idea but your pitch is not up to scratch, they will work with you on getting the pitch just right; and 3) They will put in a lot of time and effort to help you deliver the best piece possible.

To hear more about how to get published in The Magazine, read: How To Pitch: The Magazine.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Encyclopaedia Britannica Kills Print Edition

Another blow for print: After 244 years, Encyclopaedia Britannica will cease publication of its annual multi-volume book sets. The company is jumping on the all-digital bandwagon.

This is heartbreaking news to those of us nostalgic for the pre-Wikipedia era, and likely meaningless to the average high school student. But it shouldn’t be surprising. The book sets may be what most people think of when they hear the company name, but sales of the print edition account for less than 1% of Britannica’s sales. Digital is much more profitable for the company these days.

That means the 2010 encyclopedia set will be the final print edition. And it can be yours for just $1,395!

Alternately, an annual subscription to Britannica Online costs just 70 bucks, and you’ll have money left over for a trip to Cancun. Nostalgia solved.

How Web Traffic Spiked after Osama bin Laden’s Death

How much does huge, breaking news like the death of Osama bin Laden affect web traffic? WWD looks at the spikes around the web starting at 11pm on Sunday night, right after President Obama announced that Bin Laden had been killed.

The New York Times‘ web traffic jumped 62% from 10PM to 11:59PM compared to previous Sundays. The Wall Street Journal‘s web traffic jumped 81% during the 11 PM hour over past weeks.  Time magazine page views were up 290 percent from the daily average.

And CNN, which had a traffic explosion, saw a 217 percent gain in page views from Sunday night to 1PM on Monday. Moreover, CNN reported that Monday was one of their 10 biggest days in history.

Let’s just see how long the story lasts.

Mail Online Now Has More Web Traffic than The Huffington Post

New figures from comScore show that Mail Online, the website of the UK-based Daily Mail, passed The Huffington Post in March to become the second-most visited “newspaper” site in the world. (The most popular website is still the New York Times, by a wide margin.)

According to comScore, Mail Online reported a 27% rise in unique visitors between February and March, to 39,635,000. Huffington Post, meanwhile, recorded a 20% lift, to 38,429,000 unique visitors.

Guardian reports that Mail Online has “grown exponentially in the past three years, in part due to its showbiz-laden front page, but also because of its focus on U.S. news. Associated [Newspapers, the Daily Mail's owner] has been hiring editorial staff in New York and Los Angeles to feed its online news operation.”

Huffington Post, at least you’ll always have the most adorable kitten videos. They’ll never catch up to you there.