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Posts Tagged ‘Domino’

Changes at Domino

Domino is undergoing some editorial shuffling. According to The New York Post, its editor-in-chief, Michelle Adams, is departing the magazine and her job will be split between two people.

On the print side, Robert Leleux has been named editorial director. He most recently served as Domino’s creative director. Taking over digital duties — as digital director — is Krissy Tiglias. She previously served as deputy editor of Real Simple.

This doesn’t appear to be a sign that things are headed south for the brand. On the contrary, Beth Brenner, the Domino’s publisher and chief revenue officer, said she expects the magazine’s publishing frequency to increase next year.

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Domino Media Group Relaunches Domino

Domino is officially back. As we noted last month, the brand is now an e-commerce site and a quarterly publication. The twist is that Condé Nast has announced a new, independent entity — Domino Media Group — to helm the relaunch.

Domino Media Group might be new, but any Domino fan will likely recognize two of the names guiding the ship. Michelle Adams, a member of the original Domino editorial team, has been named editor-in-chief; and Beth Brenner, Domino’s first publisher, is joining as chief revenue officer. Andy Appelbaum, Cliff Sirlin and Aaron Wallace — who each had their hands in succesful e-commerce sites, like Seamless Web — will serve as co-founders of Domino Media Group.

Domino’s new site will be live at some point today, and the new issues of Domino sell for $11.99.

Domino to Relaunch as Quarterly Publication and E-Commerce Site

Domino, the decor magazine that Condé Nast folded in 2009, is staging a comeback. According to WWD, Project Décor — a social media platform for design fans — is relaunching the magazine as a quarterly print publication and e-commerce site. Condé will retain an ownership stake in the brand.

The revamped Domino is expected to debut this fall, which should make readers of the defunct publication excited. Especially if it returns to its old form.

The good news on that end is that Beth Brenner, the original publisher of the magazine, is taking on a role. However, we would suggest that you don’t hold your breath for Deborah Needleman, Domino’s founding editor, to return. She’s editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Magazine, which we hear is a pretty good gig.

Is HGTV Magazine In The Works?

hgtv.jpg

With the success of Food Network Magazine and the loss of shelter titles like Domino in the past year, it sort of comes as no surprise that Hearst would be in talks with Scripps-owned lifestyle channel HGTV to launch a new magazine.

New York magazine’s Daily Intel blog reports today that Hearst prez Cathie Black is hoping to launch the shelter magazine, citing unnamed sources within the magazine publisher. Hearst already publishes Food Network Magazine, tied to Scripps’ popular foodie channel, which launched in late 2008 with its first paid issue this past summer — so it doesn’t seem like it would be too difficult to do the same thing with HGTV, following the Food Network Magazine model.

Now the question is: would you read HGTV Magazine?

Read more: Hearst To Launch HGTV Magazine? –Daily Intel

Previously: Cablevision Customers Get Their Food Network Back

Condé Nast’s Dead Titles May See New Life In Licensing Deals

gourmet2.jpgWhether its digital versions of its magazines or partnerships with e-commerce sites it’s clear Condé Nast is on the hunt for new sources of revenue.

Today’s report in Mediaweek adds that Condé may be taking it one step further in seeking a new life for its now-defunct titles, Cookie, Domino and Gourmet, in the form of things like branded kitchen appliances. In this respect, execs have been reportedly telling staffers to look to rival publisher Meredith Corp. for inspiration; the Midwestern company has been pumping out Better Homes & Gardens-branded products for years.

But, of course, don’t expect any products connected to Condé Nast brands to cheapen its namesake –that’s a fear Si Newhouse has always had, which has kept the publisher out of licensing deals before. Thoughtfully chosen, high-end partnerships are probably where this company will end up, much like last month’s tie-in with Vogue and e-commerce site Gilt Groupe. But even if Condé can squeeze some money out of its dead titles’ brand names, those products can’t make up for the magazines we miss so much.

Condé Nast’s Cultural ShiftMediaweek

Previously: Conde Keeps Gourmet Alive In App Form

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: A Timeline Of Magazine Closings

taylor_swift_blender_cover-x622200.jpgIt’s been a tough year for the publishing industry, and magazines in particular have had it rough. Every major publisher has had to shutter at least one of its titles, and some of our favorite glossies have gone to that great magazine rack in the sky.

While it would take forever to list all the over 400 magazines that have folded this year, we here at FishbowlNY put together a timeline of some of the bigger names that were shuttered this year. The bad news? It looks like in the last six months of the year the number of titles snowballed. Here’s hoping that 2010 looks a lot brighter.

After the jump, our timeline

Read more

FishbowlNY Readers Respond: Gourmet Saddest Closing in 2009

gourmetmag111.jpgLast week we asked readers, “What print title will you miss the most” after the year full of closures?

The response was indisputable: Gourmet magazine, the award-winning epicurean title published by Condé Nast that was closed along with three other magazines in October, was far and away your number one choice, coming in with 28 percent of your votes.

Coming in second was Domino, also a Condé title, while Portfolio and the recently shuttere demise of Editor & Publisher jostled for points with nine and eight percent of your votes, respectively.

Regional papers like The Washington Blade, The Baltimore Examiner, and The Rocky Mountain News apparently only affected those living where the paper was distributed, since they got the least amount of votes, although ironically in that same pile is Fortune Small Business, which only two percent of FishbowlNY readers were sad to see go.

Previously: Breaking: Condé Shutters Four Magazines: Cookie, Gourmet, Two Bridal Titles, Could E&P Have Been Saved?, Conde Nast Shutters Domino

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: New York Media’s Biggest Business Decisions

4 times square.jpgNew York is home to some of the biggest media companies in the country, like Condé Nast, The New York Times Co., News Corp., Hearst and Time Warner, just to name a few.

This year, those companies were imperiled, struggling to survive like many other companies around the world. But as print media disputed declarations that its days were numbered, these once-great companies that made their money from print pubs were fighting hard to keep their heads above water. In order to do that they made some decisions — like bringing in new investors, closing publications and selling them off. It was in no way a big year for media deals, but there were a few. Below, our list of the biggest business stories to come out of the New York media world this year.

Bloomberg LP Buys BusinessWeek

After seeking a buyer for BusinessWeek for most of the fall, publisher McGraw-Hill finally cut a deal with Bloomberg LP, which snapped up the magazine in October. The result? Bloomberg BusinessWeek, a new vision of the mag that has a new editor and a smaller staff.

After the jump, Carlos Slim invests in the Times, classical music and the Comcast-NBCU deal.

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Welcome To FishbowlNY’s Best Of Lists Of 2009

nye2000.jpgAs the year comes to a close, we couldn’t resist taking a look back at all the great things that the media industry covered and produced, all the people who rose to prominence, maintained their perch atop the heap or had dramatic falls, and all the events that were covered faithfully and at length on the pages of our favorite newspapers and magazines and on computer screens across the city.

For better or worse, 2009 was a year that won’t easily be forgotten by those in the New York media world. It started with a bang: Barack Obama‘s inauguration, which gave us all hope of something better to come.

But for all that hope, we fear that for those in our industry, 2009 will be remembered for all those things lost. Popular publications like Domino and Gourmet published their last issues (and we’re still waiting to hear about what’s in store for Editor & Publisher) and thousands lost their jobs industry-wide. We also lost some big names in the industry, like Walter Cronkite and Dominick Dunne, to name just two.

As we head towards 2010, and a brand new decade, we’re cheered by the fact that our industry is started to show some signs of recovery. After a crushing 2008, 2009 became the year of “flat is the new growth.” We’ve already sunk to new lows, so any growth is promising, even if we’ll never reach the soaring heights in terms of the ad sales and employee counts of earlier this decade. Growth is our only option.

We’re happy to say goodbye and good riddance to 2009. But as we look to the future, let’s take a moment to remember all that happened this year — for better or worse. Over the next few days, we’ll be compiling what we think were the biggest moments in New York media this year. Plug in those Christmas lights, pour yourself some eggnog, and settle in for a recap of the year that was.

(Photo by Paul Mannix)

What Titles Were You Sad To Lose In 2009?

gourmet.jpgIt hasn’t been the easiest year for print journalism. Crain’s New York Business reported Friday that 367 magazines have been axed in the last 12 months, with 64 going online-only, according to preliminary numbers from online database Mediafinder.com. (In October, Mediafinder said 383 had already closed up shop during the first nine months for the year).

According to The Business Insider, by July over 105 newspapers received similar treatment. Many more have had to scale back or go to an almost entirely digital format to survive.

In early October, Condé Nast took a particularly brutal hit with the shuttering of four titles: Gourmet, Cookie, Modern Bride, and Elegant Bride. And those closures came months after Condé folded Domino and Portfolio earlier in the year.

Still, it could have been worse…The New York Times is still around, despite some pessimistic predictions, right? So we here at FishbowlNY would like to hear from our readers: which closing affected you the most? Feel free to add your own to our list, and remember, we’re sticking to print publications (RIP Jossip.com) that disappeared in 2009, not including any that went online-only. And pass it along to your friends — we’ll be taking your answers into consideration next week, when we feature some year-end lists handpicked by the FishbowlNY editors. What can we say, it’s that time of year.


What print title will you miss the most?(trends)

Read More: 367 magazines shuttered in 2009Crain’s

Previously: Breaking: Condé Shutters Four Magazines: Cookie, Gourmet, Two Bridal Titles, Report: More Than 100 Magazines Shuttered In Last Three Months

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