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Posts Tagged ‘Domino’

Elle Decor Raises Rate Base, Expands Ad Staff

elle decor.jpgWho said the shelter category is dead? After finishing the year as the leader in ad sales for the category, Elle Decor said today that it was raising its rate base by 10 percent — from 500,000 to 550,000 — starting with its March 2010 issue. The magazine said it will deliver an average circulation of 588,000 through the first half of next year.

The Hachette Filipacchi pub also expanded its ad sales team, promoting Matthew Talomie to the position of advertising director and appointing Linda Tullio, formerly of the recently shuttered Metropolitan Home, New York manager for Elle Decor.

“Matthew has been a creative, resourceful member of our staff for the last two years; this new role will allow him to contribute even more to our success,” said Elle Decor publisher Barbara Friedmann. “Linda’s 11 years with Metropolitan Home have made her an invaluable resource; this new position allows her to share her expertise.”

And although Elle Decor nabbed the top spot in ad pages in the shelter category — for the first time in its 20-year history — its success is no doubt related to the closure of other shelter mags like Domino, Southern Accents and Metropolitan Home, whose “highest-quality subscribers” have been added to Elle Decor‘s readership, resulting in the rate base increase, the magazine said today.

Related: Breaking: Hachette Shutters Metropolitan Home

Magazine Deathwatch: Budget Travel

budget travel.jpgWill Budget Travel be the next title to go the way of Domino and so many other magazines this year?

That’s the sad news being reported by New York Magazine‘s Daily Intel, which claims that the magazine, which is owned by Newsweek publisher Washington Post Co., is already clearing out. (Update: We received word from a Newsweek spokesman that Budget Travel is not folding. Read the full update here) The reported closure is likely due to rapidly declining ad revenue, something many magazines have been experiencing. Said Daily Intel:

“The company had a 33 percent drop in revenue for their magazine division in the most recent quarter, compared to the third quarter last year — but they attributed it publicly to losses in ad revenue at Newsweek.”

Our sister blog MediaJobsDaily adds that, if the magazine is closing up shop today, January’s issue may be its last: “staff were in the midst of closing ad sales for February when ‘suddenly told to hold on the usually tight closing date.’”

Know anything? Send us an email or leave a tip in the box on the right.

UPDATE: A Newsweek spokesman tell us that Budget Travel lives on.

Budget Travel Shuttering? –Daily Intel

Budget Travel To Close Soon? — MediaJobsDaily

Reader’s Digest Names New Integrated Sales VP

maureenpic.JPG Reader’s Digest Association is making good on its promise of major restructuring after filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy earlier this year.

Despite layoffs late last month, today the news is good at the Reader’s Digest publisher, with Maureen Polo announced as the new VP of Integrated Sales and Marketing for the company’s U.S. Affinities, replacing Mark Wildman as of November 9.

Before joining RDA in 2007, Polo worked in sales for Condé Nast Media Group, Domino and Self, and she started her career at This Old House.

Polo will be working in RDA’s recently created U.S. Affinities division, led by Suzanne Grimes, which combined the company’s Food & Entertaining group with a Home & Garden affinity last month.

Full press release, after the jump.

Read more

Another Shake Up At Condé Nast: Details Publisher Out

details oct cover.jpgAfter yesterday’s dark day at Condé Nast, with four magazines closing and one publisher from a shuttered pub getting reassigned, we were not surprised to hear today that Details publisher Steven Deluca is leaving his post.

A Condé publicist confirmed the move, noting that Bill Wackermann, Glamour‘s publisher, will now oversee the men’s magazine as well.

The company is not making any other statements, but as The New York Observer points out:

Details has long been on a short-list of magazines that could potentially be eliminated, but was thrown a life line this year. It’ll be up to Mr. Wackermann — who was named the publishing director of Domino only weeks before it was eliminated — to try to make it a viable business.”

Women’s Mag Editors Meet To Discuss Launching Online Publications

mb mag editors.jpgOn Monday, mediabistro.com is holding its annual event for senior level women’s magazine and online editors. Every year the invite-only event brings together women working in the industry to swap stories and compare experiences. Its panels have previously featured editors in chief like Janice Min and Cindi Leive.

But this year, due to the significant changes that have occurred in the past year in the media and magazine worlds, the event is welcoming high profile editors who have left print publications to launch online publications — with a few representing this growing group by speaking on a panel at the event.

The event, which will include a networking cocktail hour with the panel held afterward over dessert, will feature panelists Caroline Little, the CEO of Guardian North America; Caroline Miller, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Newser; Nicole Stagg, founding editor of Hearst‘s new beauty focused Web site RealBeauty.com; Jennifer Salant, VP of business development at Glam Media and Michelle Adams, a former editor at the now-defunct Domino who recently launched online shelter and lifestyle magazine, Lonny.

The whole event will be emceed by comedienne Sara Benincasa, who gained national notorteity last year thanks to her Sarah Palin impersonations. Benincasa will keep panelists on track with discussions about current projects, the challenges of online content, the benefits of leading an online pub, incorporating multimedia and what all of these new digital publications mean for print editors’ futures.

Attendees will also be encouraged to discuss pressing topics with tablemates, thanks to discussion topics provided at each table. “It’s something we do every year and everyone really likes it,” explained Carmen Scheidel, director of education, events and multimedia content at Mediabistro, who planned the event. “It’s like an ice breaker that’s not corny.”

Between the cocktails, dessert and free-flowing discussion, it sounds like everyone has lots of fun at these events, year after year. Don’t believe us? Check out some pictures from last year.

Although the event is closed to the public, it’s not to late for you to grab a seat. Senior level magazine or online editors can email mediabistro’s events department for ticket information.

Dwell Publisher Michela O’Connor Abrams Gives Advice About Building A Community

Michela_923.jpgStrong media brands — like shelter and design brand Dwell — are managing the weather the economic storm by diversifying their content and building a strong and loyal community.

In an interview today on mediabistro.com, Dwell‘s president and publisher Michela O’Connor Abrams — a veteran of high technology and business magazines who joined Dwell at the outset in 2002 — described how she helped attract and build the incredible Dwell community:

“If I had learned anything from working at high-tech and business publications it was this: You serve a community, and you should endeavor to know everything about that community — and I mean everything — no matter what your topic is. Like what kind of running shoes they wear, and scotch they drink, and vacations they take, and where they take them, and what airline they like to fly, and cars they drive; the whole psychographic profile. And then and only then could you really understand how to attract a community and make the most of it on any number of platforms. So we literally drew the model into the business plan that had the Dwell community that we call design-seekers, who are professionals and consumers, in the middle.”

O’Connor Abrams also talked about where she saw Dwell fitting in among other media brands, whether folding Domino was a good idea and what the future holds for the medium.

“In 2002, believe me, everybody in New York, all the agencies and clients, said to me, ‘Call me when your circulation is at a quarter million and call me again when you’re at 500,000, and we’ll work with you then.’ That has changed dramatically. I didn’t give in to that, because I knew it was the wrong thing to do for our model. But the larger media companies did do that. And in order to maintain those circ levels, they did things like charge 50 cents an issue and $3.50 on the newsstand, so when advertising came down, there was nothing to rely on…The reason I believe that print will be here a long time is that we do have a lot of intelligent people in this industry who now realize the folly in chasing an ad base, and they’re now cutting rate bases, as you see.”

Read more of O’Connor Abrams’ insights here.

Dayton Litereary Peace Prize Winners Announced|NYT & Twitter|NYP Parody|Domino Editor Launches Online Shelter Mag|Meet The Texas Tribune

GalleyCat: The winners of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize have been announced: Richard Bausch won the fiction prize and Benjamin Skinner has been awarded the nonfiction prize for his book, “A Crime So Monstrous: Face to Face with Modern Day Slavery.”

BayNewser: The New York Times is in the process of developing tools to help sort through Twitter for commentary it can use in its stories.

Daily Finance: The activists behind yesterday’s New York Post parody were detained as they tried to distribute the pub outside of the Post‘s offices. Today, the Post ran the headline “We’re flattered!” on an Associated Press story about the parody, which was meant to raise awareness of climate change.

WWD: Ex-Domino editor Michelle Adams and business partner Patrick Cline are launching an online shelter magazine: Lonny. “Our goal is not to replace Domino, as there will clearly never be a replacement, but rather to help fill the void that has been left by so many closing shelter publications and help bridge the gap between traditional print magazines and the online world,” Adams said.

VIDEO: Meet the newsroom of the new non-profit, non-partisan online news venture the Texas Tribune, led by former Texas Monthly editor Evan Smith. The site launches November 3.

Recessionwire Founder And Former Portfolio.com Lifestyle Editor Moves To Post

Another Portfolio vet has scored a sweet gig.

Sara Clemence, the former lifestyle editor of Portfolio.com and co-founder of Recessionwire.com, has been appointed deputy business editor at The New York Post.

According to her Recessionwire bio Clemence’s job at Portfolio.com disappeared in a round of layoffs at the magazine at the end of last year. She was moved over to Conde Nast publication, shelter magazine Domino, which folded the same day. Clemence then went on to found Recessionwire with another former Portfolio.com staffer Laura Rich and freelance writer Lynn Parramore.

Clemence formerly worked for Forbes.com, The Albany Times Union and The Anniston Star. After working for the past few years in online media, it will be interesting to see what changes Clemence will bring to bear at New York’s News Corp.-owned tabloid paper.

Related: Former Portfolio.com Staffer Lands TV Gig

Author & Columnist Michael M. Thomas Talks Condé Nast On The Menu: “There Are Problems That You Can’t Consult Your Way Out Of”

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Today on the media- bistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven were joined by novelist and newspaper columnist Michael M. Thomas to talk the morning’s media headlines.

The first topic tackled was the news that magazine publisher Condé Nast had hired consulting company McKinsey & Co..

“What management consulting companies are there to do is to protect the people…who hired them,” Thomas said. “When I heard that Condé Nast had hired McKinsey, I have to say, based on my own experience…I am both surprised and not optimistic. Unless McKinsey can deploy literally millions of consultants around the country to get people to start reading newspapers again, I can’t see what good they would do at a creative outfit like Condé Nast.”

According to Thomas, Condé was once a thriving company thanks to the “healthy cash flow” produced by the newspaper side, which was then invested into Condé’s popular magazines. “Si Newhouse is undoubtedly some kind of genius when it comes to magazine publishing,” Thomas said.

However, as the newspaper industry started to fail, Condé faltered, closing a handful of titles in the past year — including business mag Portfolio, Domino and Men’s Vogue — and cutting costs, and staff, across the board. But Thomas said he doesn’t think McKinsey will be able to do much more than dispatch more staffers. “There are just business problems that you can’t consult your way out of,” he said.

Also discussed: the future of the book industry and Thomas’s book, “Love & Money.” “There’s nothing in this book that couldn’t happen and, in some cases, came very close to happening,” he said.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Swine Flu Hits Conde Nast As Newhouse Profile Hits Newsstands

nymag.pngThis morning, a warning went out to all of Conde Nast‘s New York employees that an employee on the 12th floor of the company’s 4 Times Square headquarters had tested positive for swine flu. (If you’re hip to Conde HQ you know that floor is where Vogue is housed.)

But since the memo noted that the infected employee is “under a doctor’s care and currently recovering at home,” the media company was probably more worried this morning about the latest New York magazine cover story, which profiled Conde chairman Si Newhouse.

Steve Fishman‘s in-depth profile attempts to get to the heart of Newhouse’s psyche, quoting an anonymous source who calls him “semi-blank,” and asserting that he surrounds himself with superstar editors who represent a part of himself that he can’t express on his own. “In a sense, he’s like a polished surface, and the editors tend to see themselves in him,” Fishman wrote.

And of course Fishman can’t ignore the fact that Conde Nast is in the red despite closing a number of magazines in the past two years, including, most recently, Portfolio. Still, he points out that “The belief around the building is that next year, if the economy recovers, Conde Nast will again turn profitable.” Fishman doesn’t let on if he agrees, but he does mention that there are still rumors of more magazine closings to come. “Which will be next? Wired? Architectural Digest? Does the company really need two food magazines?”

As a former Conde employee ourselves, we did find at least one omission in Fishman’s reporting. His list of shuttered publications — Jane, House & Garden, Men’s Vogue, Golf for Women, Domino and Portfolio — he left out our former home, the men’s wear trade DNR.

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