TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Doree Shafrir’

Shafrir, Lawson To Return To Gawker

ggg.jpgAs revealed by TheAwl.com yesterday, and confirmed by Gawker editor-in-chief Gabriel Snyder via Twitter, it looks like Doree Shafrir will be returning to Nick Denton‘s empire in the New Year.

TV writer Richard Lawson will be back, too, Snyder tweeted. He left Gawker earlier this year to work for TV.com.

Shafrir left Gawker in 2007 to join The New York Observer, but was among those let go from the paper in June.

Could these decisions to return to the blog have anything to do with Gawker’s recent decision to offer its writers full-time employment and benefits?

Doree Returns (To Gawker) –TheAwl

Previously: Gawker Offers Writers Full-Time Employment

Breaking: Layoffs At The Observer

observer.pngEarlier this week, The New York Observer said good-bye to editor Peter Kaplan, and now there are rumors swirling that more staffers are heading out the door.

Daily Intel has a report that newly appointed editor-in-chief Tom McGeveran is handing out pink slips today, while Gawker has a tentative list of those who are rumored to be victims of the axe, including Matt Haber, Spencer Morgan, Doree Shafrir, Chris Shott, Peter Stevenson and John Vorwald.

We’re going to keep on this story as it develops but drop us a line or leave us a note in the comments if you hear anything.

Update: Doree Shafrir reposted the Gawker item on her Twitter feed basically confirming the whole mess. Sad times!

Another update: Haber tells us through his Observer email “All’s well.”

More: The New York Times Media Decoder blog has more information about the bloodbath, revealing that a bulk of the layoffs came from the newsroom, one third of which got the axe.

“Reducing the size of our reporting staff was not an easy decision to make,” Christopher Barnes, president of the Observer Media Group, told the Times in a written statement. “Unfortunately, the New York Observer is not immune to the economic pressures being felt industry-wide. The reality is we had to cut back in order to move forward.”

Talk to Your Momma Lately?


Love, Mom: Poignant, Goofy, Brilliant Messages from Home from Postcards From Yo Momma on Vimeo.

Doree Shafrir
— currently of the NYO, formerly of Gawker — and Jessica Grose — formerly of Jezebel, currently of Slate‘s upcoming Double X — have a book coming out! They explain it all above. Now go call your mother (or email, or text, or Twitter, as the case may be).

Freelancia Implodes as Blogistan’s Borders Expand

MAP2008.jpg

Recently, New York Observer ran a doom and gloom piece about the lack of freelance magazine writers. They’re all blogging. Doree Shafrir reports that it’s a harsh world out there:

For most established but not well-known writers, $2 per word at a major magazine is standard, though usually negotiable. So even if a fledgling magazine writer were to write one 1,500-word feature a month for a national magazine–which would in itself be a difficult feat to pull off–he or she would be pulling in $36,000 a year before taxes. That’s also assuming that none of the stories were killed or held and that everyone paid on time.

Luckily, Alissa Walker, former Unbeige editor, posted the perfect rejoiner:

Now, I don’t write one 1,500 feature a month. I write six or seven or eight stories a month, ranging from 300 to 2,000 words (and, ahem, I don’t always get $2 a word). Even when I was a fledgling–which, I guess, I still am–I was writing more than 1,500 words a month. That meant pitching a helluva lot more stories than I actually landed. And yes, at first, with smaller magazines, hounding people to pay me. But selling 1,500 words a month? More than do-able for a new freelancer.

Hell yes.

Jessica Wakeman, with a day job at the HuffPo, believes in web only.

Jay Busbee says no one reads magazines anyway.

Debbi Mack has our favorite Dr. Johnson witticism as her tagline.

And Daily Intelligencer points out that blogging is a stepping stone to greater things, as Ms. Shafrir knows all too well.

It only matters because the stakes are so small.

Inside The Time 100 Party

America Ferrera and John Mayer

It’s arguably the most exclusive magazine party of the year. (Graydon Carter‘s Vanity’s Fair Oscar party perhaps being the other.) John Edwards mingled with John Mayer. Sir Richard Branson (just back from dogsledding in Alaska) commandeered the corner of the bar like a Virgin spaceship, and allowed Henry Kissinger to ride co-pilot. Craigslist’s Craig Newmark chatted up Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales. New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick walked through the cocktail hour unrecognized. Michael J. Fox, too, virtually unnoticed, chatted with Elizabeth Vargas near the glass window overlooking Central Park. Arianna Huffington was noticed. (Line uttered in every pre-dinner conversation: “Is that someone? It looks like someone, I don’t know … do you?”)

Time Warner execs — like Richard Parsons and Jeffrey Bewkes — buzzed along the edges as the usual media-on-media action (including Ad Age‘s Nat Ives, WWD‘s Stephanie Smith, Jossip’s David Hauslaib, New York mag’s Jesse Oxfeld, Gawker’s Lockhart Steele and Doree Shafrir, ETP’s Rachel Sklar, Glynnis MacNicol, Julia Allison, Radar‘s Jeff Bercovici, NYO‘s Michael Calderone) made nice use of the open bar.

But as much firepower as there was at last night’s Time 100 party at Jazz at Lincoln Center, just 36 of the 100 to make 2007′s “most influential people in the world” list made it, and there were plenty of notable no-shows: No Obama. No Borat. No Queen of England. Rosie. No Leo. No Gore. No Timberlake. No Tyra.

But impassioned speeches — delivered over dinner by Elizabeth Edwards, Brian Williams, Bloomberg (with an ode to late Boston Celtics’ exec Red Auerbach — huh?) Branson and others — and a three-song set by Mayer more than made up for the relative lack of A-listers.

Others spotted during cocktail hour: Cate Blanchett, Mayor Bloomberg, Queen Rania Al-Abdullah of Jordan, Simon Fuller, Charlie Rose, Tina Fey, Mario Cuomo, Martha Stewart, Brian Grazer, Gayle King (no Oprah), Matt Lauer, Chris Matthews, Brian Williams, Ziyi Zhang, Police Commisioner Ray Kelly, Suzanne Vega, Harvey Weinstein, David Lauren and Lauren Bush.

FishbowlNY’s Coverage Of Last Year’s Time 100:

  • Inside the Time 100 Party
  • Diddy’s Time 100 Posse Bigger Than Most Posses
  • Time 100: The Most Influential People in the Room

    More photos:

    Read more

  • << PREVIOUS PAGE