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Posts Tagged ‘Doug Vogt’

Recovered ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff Celebrates ‘Alive Day’

Four years ago today, ABC News’ Bob Woodruff narrowly escaped death.

Reporting from Iraq, the World News Tonight co-anchor was in a convoy struck by a roadside bomb, injuring both Woodruff and cameraman Doug Vogt. But in the four years since, Woodruff has beaten the insurmountable odds to recover from his serious brain injury and work on camera again.

Today, our sister blog TVNewser reports, Woodruff is celebrating his ‘Alive Day’ with a father-daughter dance with his twin nine-year-old daughters, as well as a big interview with former John Edwards aide Andrew Young on 20/20 tonight. Woodruff promises some big news from his interview with Young — “revelations that you’ll hear from an aide who was witness to much of this incredible mess.”

And even bigger news for Woodruff — he has stopped going to speech and physical therapy. He told TVNewser:

“Most of my friends and family around me four years ago, would have never really thought that I would be able to do what I’m doing now. I’m very close to the way I was before.

There’s no way that you return to exactly the way you were, but there are parts of you that are better.”

Read more: Bob Woodruff’s Big Interview Just Part Of A Big Day –TVNewser

Previously: Once Seriously Injured In Iraq, Woodruff Returns

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Bob Woodruff: ‘I Saw My Body Floating’

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Last year, Bob Woodruff spent 27 days as co-anchor of ABC’s World News Tonight. His 28th day — January 29, 2006 — was one he can’t remember too well. Nor can he remember the 36 days spent in a coma recovering from injuries he and cameraman Doug Vogt suffered from a roadside bomb while reporting in Iraq.

“The 28th day was a problem,” ABC News chief David Westin said.

Woodruff screened To Iraq And Back, a prime-time documentary on the blast and his recovery — and the soldiers who’ve returned from Iraq with traumatic brain injuries — for a dozen or so media reporters, some teary-eyed, this morning in New York.

Woodruff says he remembers seeing his body “floating below” him in the U.S. tank he was traveling in. “I was spitting a lot of blood,” Woodruff recalled. “‘Am I alive?’”

But it’s what Woodruff can’t remember, he says, that has been the most difficult part of his recovery. (A common Woodruff refrain: “That my family had to go through all this … it kills me.”) In the days after coming out of his coma, he says he couldn’t remember his two youngest daughters’ existence, let alone their names. In a startling scene in the documentary, Woodward struggles with flash cards to identify scissors, and his children explain to him what a belt buckle is.

The third and perhaps most intriguing part of To Iraq focuses not on Woodruff but on the impact of the burgeoning “TBI” epidemic on the country’s Veteran’s hospitals, and the lack of information on “TBI” being provided by the government.

Is the government falling short in helping the veterans?

“Yes,” says Woodruff.

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