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Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Oz The Good Life’

Dr. Oz Grilled by Senate Because He’s Wacky

Dr. Oz of The Dr. Oz Show and Hearst’s Dr. Oz’s The Good Life fame is finally being forced to come clean about the medical advice he doles out to millions of people. To paraphrase Seinfeld, the prognosis is negative. A panel of senators grilled Oz on his many wacky claims that certain products can lead to weight loss, even though they definitely do not.

The panel, led by Claire McCaskill, repeatedly questioned Oz on why he would promote products that have zero science behind them. “The scientific community is almost monolithic against you in terms of the efficacy of the three products you called ‘miracles,’” said McCaskill. ”I don’t get why you need to say this stuff when you know it’s not true. When you have this amazing megaphone, why would you cheapen your show?”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: NYT Axes Abramson | Snowden Book Rights to Sony | CBS Touts Tradition

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The New York Times Replaces Abramson as Executive Editor (NYT)
Jill Abramson has been dismissed as executive editor of The New York Times and is being replaced by Dean Baquet, the managing editor, an abrupt change in leadership at one of the nation’s largest daily newspapers. FishbowlDC Abramson served as executive editor since 2011 and was the first woman in the role. According to the Times‘ coverage of the announcement, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the publisher of the paper and the chairman of The New York Times Company, told a stunned newsroom that had been quickly assembled that he had made the decision because of “an issue with management in the newsroom.” Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Despite significant achievements, Abramson’s tenure was marred by tension with Sulzberger and disagreements with Times Co CEO Mark Thompson, who took an unprecedentedly hands-on approach to managing the paper’s editorial resources. Abramson also suffered from perceptions among staff that she was condescending and combative. Mashable Abramson previously served as the Times‘ Washington bureau chief and managing editor before taking the executive editor role. People with knowledge of the Times newsroom said some staffers questioned how much Abramson enjoyed running the paper. She was sometimes conspicuously absent from the newsroom; one notable occasion was the day after Hurricane Sandy slammed into the New York region. New York Post / AP Baquet, 57, who is the first African-American to hold the newspaper’s highest editorial position, received a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting in 1988. Baquet originally joined the Times in 1990 as a reporter and held positions including deputy metropolitan editor and national editor. He left the paper for the LA Times in 2000, where he served as managing editor and then editor. Baquet rejoined the Times in 2007 and was Washington bureau chief before becoming the managing editor for news in Sept. 2011. FishbowlNY Former FishbowlNY editor Dylan Stableford was prophetic when he covered a breakfast event in 2008 and wrote: “Dean Baquet looked an awful lot like the next executive editor of The New York Times.” The New Yorker / Currency As with any such upheaval, there’s a history behind it. Several weeks ago, I’m told, Abramson discovered that her pay and her pension benefits as both executive editor and, before that, as managing editor were considerably less than the pay and pension benefits of Bill Keller, the male editor whom she replaced in both jobs. “She confronted the top brass,” one close associate said, and this may have fed into the management’s narrative that she was “pushy,” a characterization that, for many, has an inescapably gendered aspect.

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Alison Brower Rejoins The Hollywood Reporter

When Hearst Magazines stated earlier today that exiting EIC Alison Brower was departing for California, they left out one crucial detail. She is headed there so she can work once again for The Hollywood Reporter.

AlisonBrowerTHRPicFrom today’s Janice Min memo:

Dear Staff:

I am thrilled to announce the return of the wonderful Alison Brower to The Hollywood Reporter as deputy editorial director. Alison comes back to us from Hearst, where she served as editor-in-chief of Dr. Oz’s enormously successful lifestyle publication, Dr. Oz The Good Life. The first issue of Dr. Oz The Good Life sold out on newsstands and had to go back to press for reprint. Today, thanks to Alison’s impressive work, the magazine was announced as an official launch.

Prior to her work with Dr. Oz, Alison was special projects editor at The Hollywood Reporter, where she managed and edited feature packages, including the Cannes issue (one of our ASME-nominated issues of 2013) and Comedy issue. Alison also conceived and developed related web and video content for THR. Prior to her tenure at THR, Alison was the interim editor-in-chief of Seventeen.

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Dr. Oz’s Magazine Loses Two Staffers Before Debut

Dr. Oz’s magazine — Dr. Oz The Good Life — doesn’t debut until tomorrow, but there has been some early chaos behind the scenes. The New York Post reports that two key staffers from the glossy’s art and design team have already departed.

Cass Spencer, The Good Life’s design director and point person on the look of the magazine, is gone after an alleged disagreement with Hearst’s editorial director, Ellen Levine. Jenny SargentThe Good Life’s photo director, is also out. Sargent’s situation is less dramatic; she left to take a job as Billboard’s deputy photo director.

A Hearst spokesperson told the Post that the company was “extremely happy” with The Good Life and brushed off Spencer and Sargent leaving, explaining, “When magazines are in startup mode, changes occur.”

The First Issue of Dr. Oz’s Magazine is Here

Dr. Oz’s magazine, The Good Life, is set to launch February 4. As you can see from the magazine’s debut cover, Hearst has learned a thing or two from Oprah, and put Oz front and center.

Though Big O is finally considering letting someone else grace the cover of The Oprah Magazine, we expect Oz’s mug will be beaming back at us from Good Life for a long time. Oz told FishbowlNY that he would do whatever was best for The Good Life, but when a magazine is named after you, readers want more of you, so hopefully Oz has been working on his smize.

There will be 800,000 copies of The Good Life’s debut issue, with 375,000 hitting newsstands at $3.99 a pop, and the remaining being sent for free to subscribers of other Hearst titles.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Yahoo!’s Media Plans | NBC Gears Up for Olympics | Dr. Oz Covers Mag

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Yahoo! Launching Digital Magazines, Starting With Food (Adweek)
Yahoo! is getting into the magazine business. During a keynote presentation at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), CEO Marissa Mayer announced several new products, including a planned line of digital magazines, starting with Yahoo! Food. A similar product is in the work for Yahoo! Tech, which is being helmed by former New York Times columnist David Pogue. Mayer also used her CES keynote to unveil Yahoo! News Digest, a twice daily mobile news product that aggregates and synthesizes news from across the Web. USA Today The ventures represent the latest manifestation of Mayer’s emphasis on creating original material as a key part of her effort to turn around the fortunes of the tech company. The Verge When the news-summarizing startup Summly shut down last March, it was easy to imagine the company had simply been swallowed by the Yahoo! machine. Like so many founders before him, Nick D’Aloisio had sold his company to Yahoo! only to see it shuttered soon after. Its core technology was absorbed into Yahoo!’s news app less than a month later, used to summarize the day’s events. That was the last we heard from D’Aloisio, who sold Summly to Yahoo! for a reported $30 million at the age of 17 — until Tuesday. NY Observer / BetaBeat A buzz balloon about Yahoo!’s CES appearance and new product unveiling has been building and building, and now it’s popped, raining tiny chunks of news stories (“atoms”) on the heads of tech journalists everywhere. It’s not a disappointment, provided you were searching for yet another way to consume news in 2014. Ad Age / Digital Over the past year, Yahoo! has re-launched email, the homepage and Flickr. Now it’s time for a new look for its old ad business. Yahoo! is doing away with two of its highest profile ad-tech products — Right Media and Genome — and unveiling a new one, Yahoo! Advertising.

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