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Posts Tagged ‘Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’

Adweek Names Cosmo Magazine of The Year

The staffers of Cosmopolitan should be feeling great today. That is, if they’e not too hungover from celebrating their Adweek Hot List accolades. Last night Adweek announced its annual winners, and Cosmo was named Magazine of The Year; its editor, Joanna Coles, was named Editor of The Year.

Granted, Adweek’s Hot List includes an award for just about every single thing you can imagine. So if your magazine didn’t find a way to win something — Best Magazine to Read on The Toilet, Best Magazine to use When Killing a Fly, etc. — that’s sort of sad. However, everyone at Cosmo should be proud of themselves.

Below are some of the more notable Hot Week print honorees. For the full list, click here.

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NY Times on Rolling Stone Cover: Everyone Chill, Yo

The New York Times’ editorial board is sticking up for the Rolling Stone cover featuring the alleged Boston Marathon bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. In an editorial, the paper essentially says that everyone needs to chill out.

Since Rolling Stone’s cover (which shows Tsarnaev looking very Jim Morrison-like) hit the Internet, the outrage has been increasing. Walgreens even came out and said they wouldn’t sell the issue. Walgreens sells Campbell’s Chunky Soup. That’s much more dangerous than a Tsarnaev selfie.

The Times says as much, and adds that the same photo used by Rolling Stone appeared plenty of other places, including the Times:

…Singling out one magazine issue for shunning is over the top, especially since the photo has already appeared in a lot of prominent places, including the front page of this newspaper, without an outcry. As any seasoned reader should know, magazine covers are not endorsements.

The paper also notes that “Thanks to the outcry on social media and the reactions of a few timid merchants, this issue should sell quite well.”

Morning Media Newsfeed: Rolling Stone Fallout | Netflix’s Emmy Noms | Condé Nast’s Ad Growth


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Boston Magazine Counters Rolling Stone‘s Boston Bomber Cover: ‘This Is The Real Face of Terror’ (TheWrap / MediaAlley)
Boston Magazine published never-before-seen photos of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Thursday in response to Rolling Stone‘s controversial cover that critics felt depicted the accused murderer as a rock star. The photos, supplied by Mass. state police sergeant Sean Murphy, were intended to show the “real face of terror.” In one, a bloodied Tsarnaev emerges from his boat hideout while a sniper rifle trains its laser sight on his head. Boston Magazine Sean Murphy: “As a professional law-enforcement officer of 25 years, I believe that the image that was portrayed by Rolling Stone magazine was an insult to any person who has ever worn a uniform of any color or any police organization or military branch, and the family members who have ever lost a loved one serving in the line of duty. The truth is that glamorizing the face of terror is not just insulting to the family members of those killed in the line of duty, it also could be an incentive to those who may be unstable to do something to get their face on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. The Atlantic Wire While Murphy’s photographs certainly put some distance between Tsarnaev and the audience, both physically and emotionally, they will, like nearly any photograph, depend on the interpretation of the viewer to complete their message. Rolling Stone‘s image’s normalcy is uncomfortable, but its eeriness speaks volumes. The new images depict a man, at a distance, defeated. But in them, he is also seen at his most vulnerable. CNN John Wolfson, Boston Magazine‘s editor-in-chief, said the magazine has hundreds of similar photos and will publish more in its September issue. Boston Globe / MetroDesk A state police spokesman said Thursday night that Murphy had been relieved of duty for one day and will be subject to an internal investigation. “His duty status will be determined at a hearing in the near future,” said spokesman David Procopio. “[Thursday’s] dissemination to Boston Magazine of photographs of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and police activity related to his capture was not authorized by the Massachusetts State Police,” Procopio said in a statement. Boston Magazine Just one day after the curtain was raised on the Rolling Stone cover featuring Tsarnaev, one day before it hit newsstands, there were several copies of the magazine selling on eBay for around $20.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Rolling Stone Banned | Huntsman Joins MSNBC | Sun-Times Layoffs


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Rolling Stone‘s ‘The Bomber’ Issue Banned by CVS, Walgreens, Rite Aid And Kmart (HuffPost)
Multiple retailers and drug stores say they won’t be selling this week’s Rolling Stone, which features Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover. “As a company with deep roots in New England and a strong presence in Boston, we believe this is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones,” CVS wrote in a statement. Boston Herald Boston mayor Thomas M. Menino wrote to the publisher of Rolling Stone, telling him the decision to put accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover “rewards a terrorist with celebrity treatment” — treatment the magazine should have given to the survivors. “The survivors of the Boston attacks deserve Rolling Stone cover stories,” Menino wrote in a letter to Jann Wenner, “though I no longer feel that Rolling Stone deserves them.” Rolling Stone Our hearts go out to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing, and our thoughts are always with them and their families. The cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and Rolling Stone’s long-standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day. The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens. PRNewser A calm, eloquent response that respectfully explains the publication’s intentions, and defends the cover and article without actually sounding defensive. While this will likely do little to assuage those who are offended — it is not, by any means, an apology — it may at least open the floor for candid and civilized conversation. New Yorker / NewsDesk Just because something sparks outrage doesn’t mean that it is outrageous. The vitriol and closed-mindedness of the Web response to the Rolling Stone cover, before anyone had the chance to read the article itself, is an example of two of the ugly public outcomes of terrorism: hostility toward free expression, and to the collection and examination of factual evidence; and a kind of culture-wide self-censorship encouraged by tragedy, in which certain responses are deemed correct and anything else is dismissed as tasteless or out of bounds. Slate / BrowBeat By depicting a terrorist as sweet and handsome rather than ugly and terrifying, Rolling Stone has subverted our expectations and hinted at a larger truth. The cover presents a stark contrast with our usual image of terrorists. It asks, “What did we expect to see in Tsarnaev? What did we hope to see?” The answer, most likely, is a monster, a brutish dolt with outward manifestations of evil. What we get instead, however, is the most alarming sight of all: A boy who looks like someone we might know. Ad Age / Media News Rolling Stone may take a hit at the newsstands over its cover story, but provocative covers often encourage single-copy sales at the same time as they spark anger.

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Rolling Stone Boston Marathon Bombing Cover Ignites Controversy [Update]

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, rock star? That’s what some people are wondering after seeing the latest cover of Rolling Stone. Tsarnaev appears on the front, and we must admit, the photo does remind us a little of Jim Morrison.

The reaction to the glossy seemingly knowingly portraying an accused terrorist as a celebrity has been swift and intense. Many people on Twitter chimed in that the cover was extremely offensive and said that they would never buy another issue of Rolling Stone. Countless more blasted the title for minimizing the victims and the families of the Boston Marathon bombing.

Of course this isn’t the first time Rolling Stone has featured an (alleged) mass murderer on its cover. In 1970, Charles Manson graced the front of the magazine with copy labeling him as “The Most Dangerous Man Alive:”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Olbermann on ESPN2 | Rolling Stone‘s Cover | Yahoo! Earnings Down


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Keith Olbermann Will Return to ESPN (NYT)
ESPN is expected to announce on Wednesday that the former network mainstay Keith Olbermann, who contentiously departed in 1997, will return to host a one-hour, nightly show for ESPN2 later this year, according to three executives with knowledge of the deal but not authorized to speak about it publicly. Olbermann, 54, became renowned for co-anchoring ESPN’s SportsCenter with Dan Patrick — arguably the most auspicious pairing in the history of the show or the network. THR The show will originate from the ABC News Nightline studio overlooking Times Square. The two-year contract returns the erstwhile SportsCenter anchor to the network where he rose to stardom as an erudite and skilled sports commentator. His pairing with Dan Patrick on SportsCenter was among the most popular and memorable in the long history of the franchise. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Olbermann had expressed interest in returning to ESPN as early as March, though network president John Skipper said at the time he was not “prepared” to bring the commentator back. HuffPost Olbermann recently signed a deal to host TBS’ studio coverage of Major League Baseball alongside Hall of Fame pitcher and analyst Dennis Eckersley in Atlanta; it’s unclear if that gig will be affected by his new one. Variety Olbermann has been out of work for 15 months since parting with Current (receiving a substantial severance package), an exit that fueled the perception of him as someone with a penchant for leaving jobs rather abruptly, and often under acrimonious circumstances. Still, he has maintained ties to his admirers via outlets such as social media, where he still commands close to 450,000 followers on Twitter.

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