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Posts Tagged ‘Edward Kennedy’

CQ-Roll Call Layoffs|NAA Says No To Bailout|Globe Union Investigates President|Tribune Bondholders Get Access|Ted Kennedy


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FishbowlDC: CQ-Roll Call cut 44 jobs today, before unveiling a big restructuring of the company.

Editor & Publisher: John Sturm, the president and CEO of the Newspaper Association of America told a joint economic hearing today that the newspaper industry was not looking for a government bailout.

The Boston Phoenix: The Boston Globe‘s biggest union, the Boston Newspaper Guild, has taken measures to prevent union president Dan Totten from handling union finances. “Information has come to the attention of the Executive Committee that President Daniel Totten has engaged in conduct which appears to be violative of the constitution regarding financial matters involving Local funds,” the union said in a note to members.

New York Times: Some Tribune bondholders have been granted access to documents in order to investigate the 2007 of the company to Sam Zell.

WowoWow: “60 Minutes” correspondent Lesley Stahl interviews Ted Jr., Sen. Edward Kennedy‘s son, and the editor and publisher who worked with the senator on his memoir. (See video above)

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At Least Two Bidders Still Interested In Boston Globe

boston-globe-logo.jpgToday, The Boston Globe has an update on its own sale process.

The Boston paper reports that two potential buyers have offered to pay around $35 million for the Globe and the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, and have visited the paper in the past five days.

One group is led by Stephen Taylor, whose family used to own the Globe before selling it to The New York Times Co. The other group is private equity firm Platinum Equity, which purchased The San Diego Union-Tribune earlier this year.

Since the potential sale was revealed over the summer, another party headed by Boston Celtics co-owner Stephen Pagliuca and Jack Connors, chairman of Partners HealthCare, was said to be interested in the Globe. However, today the Globe reports that Pagliuca and Connors made the lowest bid for the paper and have not taken a tour of the facilities in recent days. Pagliuca and Connors could be pulling out of the bidding as Pagliuca considers running for Sen. Edward Kennedy‘s Senate seat. If he runs, owning a newspaper could be a conflict of interest, the paper said.

Final bids are due at the end of the month.

Last week, Times Co. executives Arthur Sulzberger Jr. and Janet Robinson visited the Globe in an effort to calm employees’ fears about the future of the paper.

“Our hand is not being forced,” Sulzberger told the Boston employees, adding that the decision to sell would take a number of factors into consideration, including the impact a sale would have on the paper and the Boston community.

Two bidders visit Globe; third group may drop outBoston Globe

Earlier: Sulzberger, Robinson Try To Calm Boston Globe Employees’ Fears In Meeting Today

Thoughts About Depression Era Writers On The Menu

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Author David Taylor joined Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven on today’s mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu.

Taylor, the author of Soul of a People: The WPA Writers’ Project Uncovers Depression America weighed in on today’s biggest media headlines, including The New York Timesarticle today about Sen. Edward Kennedy‘s upcoming memoir, which was supposed to stay under wraps until its release.

Taylor also discussed his book and writers’ lives during the Great Depression. He compared it to the current economic recession that has forced many journalists and writers into unemployment. “There was a not an idea of a social safety net if you did lose your job,” Taylor said of the Great Depression. “People would have their houses foreclosed on as a result of losing their jobs and they would move away, the whole family would move away, and no one would talk about it…So there was a lot more isolation of journalists and writers who lost their jobs, which we see something of now, but it was even deeper then.”

During the Depression, the U.S. government also launched the Federal Writers’ Project as part of the Works Progress Administration. “There was an opening in the legislation creating the WPA that allowed for arts and humanities projects…but the initial focus was on infrastructure,” Taylor said. “It wasn’t until out-of-work writers really protested and said ‘We need jobs, too,’ that the federal government responded and created a small agency…for writers. At first they didn’t know exactly what to do…but they did know that they needed to provide some sort of jobs that used those skills that they had to keep morale and some prospect for economic revival going.”

Some well-known American writers like Zora Neale Hurston and Ralph Ellison came out of this federal project, Taylor said. Although the federal government has launched some stimulus works projects during this recession, do you think legislators today would ever launch a modern-day Federal Writers’ Project?

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

FishbowlNY Editor Amanda Ernst Joins This Morning’s Menu

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It was an all-blog morning as GalleyCat editor Jason Boog and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven welcomed FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst to the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast.

Amanda spoke about the Audit Bureau of Circulation’s semi-annual report due out on Monday and what it might mean for the magazine industry. She also discussed one magazine that is expected to post positive numbers in the upcoming report, Saveur and her recent interview with the epicurean magazine’s publisher Merri Lee Kingsly. Saveur is leaving its competitors in the dust by approaching ad sales in a new and different way, motivated by Kingsly’s unconventional approach, Amanda explained.

Also discussed: Sen. Edward Kennedy‘s upcoming memoir and how it will fare against Dan Brown‘s much-hyped new release and A&E‘s acquisition yesterday of Lifetime.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Kennedy Family Starts Twitter Feed|Tribune Lenders Seek Zell Investigation|Saturday Evening Post Editor Emerson Dies|New Yorker Hires 26-Year-Old Managing Editor|Kate Gosselin Takes On “The View”

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FishbowlDC: The Kennedy family has turned to Twitter and the Web to get word out about plans for Sen. Edward Kennedy‘s memorial. Check it out at @KennedyNews and TedKennedy.org.

Wall Street Journal: Tribune‘s bondholders have called Sam Zell‘s $8.2 billion takeover of the company in 2007 a “fraudalent conveyance” that plunged Tribune into bankruptcy and have asked the bankruptcy court for permission to investigate.

New York Times: William A. Emerson Jr., an editor in chief of The Saturday Evening Post, died Tuesday at age 86.

The Observer: The New Yorker has appointed a new managing editor, 26-year-old Amelia Lester, a former fact-checker for the magazine. She is replacing Kate Julian, who is moving to Washington, D.C. where her husband just got a job.

E!: Kate Gosselin will be one of the subs filling in for Elisabeth Hasselbeck on “The View” while the conservative mommy is on maternity leave. “It appears Gosselin has taken the conservative host’s riled-up advice, dished out on the show in June, to ‘get a job,’” the E! article said. “Bet Hasselbeck wasn’t expecting it to be hers.”

Vanity Fair Columnist, Prolific Author Dominick Dunne Dies

dunne.jpgSadly, news that journalist and author Dominick Dunne had died last night has been eclipsed by the story of Sen. Edward Kennedy‘s passing.

However, having just learned of Dunne’s death, we thought it only right to pay tribute to him here. Dunne’s Vanity Fair column, which focused on the glamorous and seedy parts of celebrity, including the high profile trials of OJ Simpson, the Menendez brothers and Phil Spector, was always our favorite thing to read in the glossy society mag.

According to the Associated Press, Dunne, who was 83, had battled bladder cancer for some time. He had traveled to places like Germany, the Dominican Republic and Bavaria for different cancer treatments — even claiming that he was at the same clinic as Farrah Fawcett in Bavaria, although they did not cross paths.

Update: Mediabistro.com broke news of Dunne’s cancer in March 2008. “I’m undergoing treatments now,” Dunne said at the time. “I’ve got cancer of the bladder — urinary tract — not very attractive…I just knew there was something wrong. I came back and they found this. I’ve taken the first of six treatments and then I go in the hospital and they go in and see how much they got.”

Dunne started his career in television and film, and only started writing at age 50 after being run out of Hollywood. He started by writing novels, including “The Two Mrs. Grenvilles.” He started to write for Vanity Fair in the 1980′s after meeting Tina Brown at a dinner party. He started his gig by covering the trial of the former boyfriend accused of killing his daughter Dominique, John Sweeney.

His work for Vanity Fair and his many books are his legacy. He will be missed.

Related: So What Do You Do, Dominick Dunne, Author, Vanity Fair Special Correspondent?

via the AP

More Tributes To Sen. Kennedy

kennedy_time.jpgAs the day has progressed, many media outlets have announced plans to pay tribute to Sen. Edward Kennedy. Here’s some of what we’re getting ready to see:

Time magazine is planning a commemorative issue that will feature Kennedy on the cover with tributes inside from Joe Klein, Bob Shrum, Ted Sorensen and Mike Barnicle. It is set to hit newsstands Friday. The last time Time put out a commemorative issue was to mark Michael Jackson‘s death in June.

Tonight at 9 p.m., MSNBC will present a “first look” of “The Kennedy Brothers: A Hardball Documentary.” The doc will also air, as scheduled, tomorrow at 7.

At 10 p.m., ABC News will broadcast an hour-long special, “Remembering Ted Kennedy,” which will focus on his life and legacy, anchored by Charles Gibson from Hyannis Port, Mass. and Diane Sawyer in New York.

TVNewser has a list of some of the other television specials that will be airing tonight on the networks and cable news channels.

We’re sure there will be more to come. If you hear of anything interesting memorializing Kennedy let us know.

Politico’s Calderone Talks Kennedy Coverage On The Menu

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This morning, Politico.com‘s Michael Calderone took a few minutes out of this hectic news day in Washington to join the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu. Calderone told hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven what it has been like to cover Sen. Edward Kennedy since news of his death broke late last night.

“As you can imagine, it’s been pretty chaotic,” Calderone said of the past few hours. “Here at Politico I was getting emails from the very early morning hours. Thankfully we’ve had reporters and editors who basically have been covering this story all night, both from the obituary to some of what this means for Washington, for the Congress, for Obama’s health care reform initiative. It’s just an all-encompassing story that really is going to be covered in Washington for days and weeks to come.”

“The biggest news story for the past five weeks has been health care…and this has been one of the signature issues of Ted Kennedy’s life in the Senate,” Calderone added. “So it’s almost impossible, even with his death, to continue the health care debate and in some ways not touch upon his legacy and what this means and how it will play out without Massachusetts having a senator.”

Also discussed: Kennedy’s upcoming memoirs, who might take over Kennedy’s mantle in the Senate, and non-Kennedy news like Sony’s unveiling of its new e-reader yesterday.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Today’s Coverage Of Ted Kennedy’s Death

dailynews826.jpgSenator Edward M. Kennedy died late last night at age 77 after a battle with brain cancer. Although his death came at a late hour, many newspapers were able to quickly shift gears and get photos and stories of Kennedy up on their front pages.

One front page noticeably devoid of Kennedy tributes, however, was The New York Times. But what the Grey Lady lacked in on-paper obituaries it made up for on its Web site. The paper’s home page prominently features the legendary senator and the “Today’s Paper” page features Kennedy’s obituary as the top story of the day, even though it wasn’t on the actual front page of the paper. nypost826.jpg The Times‘ Caucus blog is also in the memorial spirit, highlighting excerpts from Kennedy’s speeches.

usatoday826.jpgMeanwhile, our colleagues at TVNewser have a report on how the networks and cable news channels covered the news of Kennedy’s death when it broke last night, as well as coverage of President Barack Obama‘s statement this morning about Kennedy. And GalleyCat reports that Kennedy’s upcoming memoir, “True Compass,” is being pushed up to mid-September.

AgencySpy also notes that Kennedy died exactly one year after his historic speech at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, given shortly after he underwent brain surgery.

Kennedy’s speech from last year can be seen after the jump

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