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Posts Tagged ‘Ellen Kunes’

Sally Preston, Others Dropped by Time Inc.

Some of the names of those who were let go by Time Inc. during amid its massive layoffs are starting to circulate. A quick rundown, via Adweek:

  • Sally Preston, publisher of Real Simple, is out. Preston had only been with Real Simple since 2011. Charlie Kammerer will succeed her.
  • Ellen Kunes, editor-in-chief of Health is out. Kunes had been with the brand since 2007. Clare McHugh, editor of All You, is taking over her responsibilities.
  • Erick Yates, ad director for Entertainment Weekly, is out.
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Health Magazine Names Creative Director

Health magazine has named Lan Yin Bachelis as its new Creative Director. Bachelis was most recently Art Director of Women’s Health, a position she held since 2005. At Health she’ll be asked to update the look of the brand.

“Lan Yin creates compelling visual design that is exciting, no matter what the format — be it print, digital or mobile,” said Ellen Kunes, Editor-in-Chief of Health. “Her fresh perspective will be a huge asset to our team as we move to develop the Health franchise to be accessible on all platforms.”

Time Inc. Reuses Recipes But Cites Sources…Is It Plagiarism?

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Last week we reported how the trend of “reverse-publishing” was catching on at Meredith and Hearst, where the publishing companies were taking online recipes and putting them into “blogazine” format in print. Apparently, when Time Inc. tries something similar, its considered self-plagiarism, instead of just “crowdsourcing.”

Consider the recent New York Times article on Time’s Health, which re-used some of the recipes from the publisher’s other magazine, Real Simple. The same recipes were used, along with the original photography, although nutritional info was added. Health editor Ellen Kunes credited Real Simple as Health’s source, and said that the articles weren’t free, since they had to be retested and slightly altered to fit Health‘s standards. If the original source — again, managed by the same publisher — is cited, is this different than the content partnerships we see online, like those between Business Insider and Gawker?

Read More: For New and Healthy Recipes, a Magazine Turns to Leftovers — New York Times

Previously: “Reverse Publishing” Gains Traction at Meredith, Hearst