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Posts Tagged ‘espn’

Rick Reilly Plagiarizes His Own Column [Updated]

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, ESPN’s columnist Rick Reilly loves himself. A lot. As Deadspin points out, Reilly’s latest piece is chock full of self-plagiarism.

Reilly’s new column, “Don’t act like you’ve been there,” is about how he appreciates when athletes celebrate. So is his 2009 column, “You just won the US Open! Act like it!” That’s fine. But the self-plagiarism is so bad that we are actually worried about Reilly’s mental health. If you know the guy, maybe call him?

Here are just a few examples of Reilly’s copy and paste skills.

2009 column:
If I won a U.S. Freaking Open, I’d go absolutely electroshock, three-alarm, bat-guano nuts!

2014 column:
My point is, if I’d just won $1.1 million zops in a PGA Goddang Tour event, forget about my first win in 239 tries, I’d go absolutely electro-shock, three-alarm, bat-guano nuts!

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Bill Simmons Apologizes | US News Buys TheRun2016 | MLK Tweets Backfire

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The Dr. V Story: A Letter From The Editor (Grantland / Bill Simmons)
“How could you guys run that?” We started hearing that question on Friday afternoon, West Coast time, right as everyone was leaving our Los Angeles office to start the weekend. We kept hearing that question on Friday night, and all day Saturday, and Sunday, too. We heard it repeatedly on Twitter and Facebook. We sifted through dozens of outraged emails from our readers. We read critiques on various blogs and message boards, an onslaught that kept coming and coming. I don’t remember the exact moment when I realized that we definitely screwed up, but it happened sometime between Friday night and Saturday morning. On Sunday, ESPN apologized on our behalf. I am apologizing on our behalf right now. My condolences to Dr. V’s friends and family for any pain our mistakes may have caused. So what did we screw up? Well, that’s where it gets complicated. The Guardian In a mea culpa that stretches to almost 3,000 words, Grantland’s editor-in-chief Bill Simmons writes that despite being extensively edited by multiple people, the ESPN-affiliated website had made the “massive mistake” of failing to have its article — about the inventor of a revolutionary golf club who committed suicide while the piece was being researched, and whom it posthumously outed as transgender — read before publication by someone familiar with the transgender community. He then lists seven errors of judgment contained in the piece that would probably have been caught and corrected. “I want to apologize. I failed,” Simmons writes. THR In addition to the editor-in-chief’s very lengthy apology, Grantland also posted a response by Christina Kahrl, titled: What Grantland Got Wrong. Not only does Kahrl cover baseball for ESPN.com, she is also on the board of directors for GLAAD, making her a fitting commentator on the issue. She admitted that the fact that Dr. V was a transsexual, “wasn’t merely irrelevant to the story, it wasn’t his information to share.” Kahrl goes on to state that: “I’m trans — so what?” Grantland / Christina Kahrl When you’re a writer, you want something you create to have a long life, to be something that readers will remember and revisit for years to come. If such was Caleb Hannan’s wish, it’s been granted, because his essay on “Dr. V And The Magical Putter” figures to be a permanent exhibit of what not to do, and how not to treat a fellow human being. Deadspin This weekend, Gerri Jordan, proprietor of Yar Golf, agreed to speak with me about the chain of events that led to the October suicide of her partner, Dr. V. Monday, she declined to carry through. “I have spoken with an attorney,” she wrote in an email, “And we are gathering information for potential legal action.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Grantland Under Fire | BBC Host Dead | Roker Feeling The Heat?

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ESPN Responds to Criticism of Grantland’s ‘Dr. V’ Story (BuzzFeed)
ESPN issued a statement Sunday in response to continued controversy and criticism over a Jan. 15 Grantland article about a transgender physicist and golf club inventor. The story in question, “Dr. V’s Magical Putter,” profiled Dr. Essay Anne Vanderbilt, the inventor of the Oracle GXI smart putter club — and ultimately outed Vanderbilt as a transgender woman, against her wishes. At the end of the piece, author Caleb Hannan wrote that Vanderbilt killed herself. Slate / CultureBox Over the last few days, Twitter has bubbled over with arguments about what Hannan did and didn’t do. At one extreme are the people calling Hannan a murderer, alleging that a trans woman killed herself because she believed a reporter was about to out her. At the opposite pole are those who say Hannan did what journalists are trained to do: report out a story until he unearths the truth. Glittering Scrivener It is not the mandate of a writer to keep pursuing a private citizen’s secrets (secrets which have exactly no impact on the product you are writing about) until they kill themselves. This is not an honorable act. Jezebel It appears from the story’s tone that there was zero ethical concern whatsoever concerning the trans status. This is the sort of stuff that comes up, by the way, in 101 ethics classes: Say you’re called to cover the story of a hero who saved a drowning man from an icy river, and in the course of reporting you determine the hero is also gay, and would prefer to remain anonymous for privacy reasons. Do you report on it? The answer, of course, is no, you don’t report that detail, because the hero being gay is irrelevant to the story. But real-life scenarios are not so simple. Shakesville This is one of the most cavalier, irresponsible pieces of journalism I have read in a very long time. New Republic An inquiry to Grantland’s editors was redirected to an ESPN spokesperson. He said that Bill Simmons, who runs Grantland, will respond via Grantland soon, and wrote: “We understand and appreciate the wide range of thoughtful reaction this story has generated and to the family and friends of Essay Anne Vanderbilt, we express our deepest condolences.” Hannan did not reply to a request for comment. Nieman Storyboard I spoke to Hannan Sunday afternoon. He told me he has been following the reaction to the story, and that he is working with his editors to prepare a statement. He said he will discuss the story when he and his editors feel the time is right.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN Hires Tebow | Duplessis Joins Apple | Marvel Halts Comic Sales

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ESPN Hires Tim Tebow (ESPN)
Former Heisman Trophy winner Tim Tebow has agreed to a multiyear deal to join ESPN as an analyst for the SEC Network, it was announced Monday. “I am so excited that ESPN has given me this incredible opportunity,” Tebow said in a statement. “When I was 6 years old, I fell in love with the game of football, and while I continue to pursue my dream of playing quarterback in the NFL, this is an amazing opportunity to be part of the unparalleled passion of college football and the SEC.” Complex / Sports On Jan. 6, the former Broncos/Jets quarterback will make his ESPN debut by serving as an analyst prior to the 2013 BCS National Championship game. He’ll be on SportsCenter, College Football Live, College GameDay, and, well, just about every other college football-related show you can think of. Time / Keeping Score Although Tebow was a star quarterback in the Southeastern Conference, he struggled to make a mark in the NFL. He was released by the New England Patriots before the start of the 2013 season, after spending a season on the bench for the New York Jets in 2012. Sports Illustrated / Media Circus The initial question is how successful will Tebow be as an analyst. He is one of the most popular (and likeable) athletes in the country, and he’ll no doubt work hard to learn the craft. He also loves college football; Tebow was known for watching college games in his hotel room on Saturdays before NFL action, as well as on plane rides. Still, his opinions on football have mostly been vanilla, at least as a player speaking with the press. Bloomberg Businessweek “Tebow’s role with ESPN will not preclude him from continuing to pursue playing opportunities in the NFL,” says the press release. Yes, ESPN’s newest broadcaster joins hundreds of thousands of American men with NFL dreams currently on the not-precluded list.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Miller Out at CBS News | People‘s Premium Paper | ESPN’s Payout

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John Miller Announces He’s Leaving CBS News (TVNewser)
CBS News correspondent John Miller is leaving the network and joining the NYPD as a new commissioner re-joins the force. ”I never stay anywhere too long,” Miller said on WCBS’ newscast. “John, congratulations. Our loss is the city’s gain,” said anchor Dick Brennan. Capital New York For CBS News, the loss of Miller hits hard, with staffers calling it “devastating,” and “a huge loss.” NYT After a career spent toggling between television and law enforcement, Miller will be rejoining an old friend and boss, William J. Bratton, the incoming police commissioner. Miller’s close relationship with government agencies has troubled some media watchers, who criticized Miller’s recent 60 Minutes special report on the National Security Agency for its seemingly cozy treatment of controversial spying programs. HuffPost Meanwhile, CBS News praised Miller and his career at the network. “John Miller is a remarkable journalist with deep insight into law enforcement,” the network said in a statement on Thursday. CNN David Rhodes, the president of the network news division, said Miller’s decision was “a loss for CBS.” “There’s nobody like him, and I think people around the television industry would agree with that,” Rhodes said.

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FiveThirtyEight Names Ben Casselman Chief Economics Writer

Ben Casselman GBen Casselman is joining FiveThirtyEight — the yet-to-launch ESPN site to be edited by Nate Silver — as its chief economics writer. Caseelman comes to the site from The Wall Street Journal, where he had worked since 2006. Casselman most recently served as the Journal’s lead economics writer.

During his time at the Journal, Casselman was part of a team whose work on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill won a Gerald Loeb Award and was a Pulitzer finalist.

“Ben’s exceptional career at The Wall Street Journal demonstrates that dogged and tenacious reporting is not the enemy of data-driven journalism,” said Silver, in a statement. “By contrast, they have much the same method. It’s a matter of asking great questions, and being willing to dig under the surface of the problem to provide clarity to a wider audience amid the massive amount of data and information in the world today.”

Ten Years Later, Dan Patrick Talks to Captain Janks

On Monday, outlets across the sports spectrum were marking the 10th anniversary of the infamous “Steve Bartman game” at Wrigley Field. This morning, it was time for another related 10th anniversary – radio host Dan Patrick revisiting the prank call to ESPN Sports Center that he fielded on this date in 2003 from Howard Stern foot-in-mouth soldier Captain Janks (a.k.a. Tom Cipriano).

Patrick replayed the ESPN Janks-as-Bartman call twice on his show this morning, before “retiring” the clip. In between, he learned that the perpetrator failed first in the direction of CNN, spoke beforehand to Bartman for research purposes (!) and benefited from being able to tell ESPN he was returning a producer’s call:

“What you consider to be one of the worst moments of your career I consider to be one of the best moments of my prank phone calling career,” Janks said.

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Bill Simmons Denies Rumor That he Pushed Magic Johnson Out of NBA Countdown

When word spread that Magic Johnson was leaving ESPN’s NBA Countdown, many were shocked. Magic is slightly better at basketball than your FishbowlNY editors, so his presence would seem to be a good thing. But nevertheless, he issued a statement that he was departing. Almost immediately, a report surfaced that Bill Simmons forced Johnson out in order to gain more power over the show. Simmons told Sports Illustrated that the rumor was completely false:

Those unnamed ‘sources’ are liars. Someone planted a fake story to try to make me look bad, and there’s a 99.3 percent chance it came from someone in Bristol (which presents its own set of concerns). I was upset; I can’t lie. Maybe this happens to people more often than I realize, and maybe it comes with the territory, but man … I can’t properly explain how fantastic it was to watch basketball with Magic for nine months.

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Digital First Media Exec Touts the Power of Mobile Video

All sorts of fascinating info has been coming out of this week’s World Publishing Expo in Berlin. Among those keeping tabs on the proceedings and in some cases sharing Google docs via Twitter about the presentations has been journalism.co.uk’s Sarah Marshall.

JohnPatonBerlinToday, Digital First Media CEO John Paton spoke about his company’s expanding reliance on TOUT, a video App the Wall Street Journal started making use of in 2012. Other media companies running with the technology include CNN, ESPN and UK’s The Sun newspaper. The Digital First Media effort encompasses 1800 reporters:

The mobile video App is now used in 75 Digital First Media newsrooms. Journalists create and publish videos on the move in near real-time, with most going live in about 30 seconds.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN/PBS Doc Fallout | Times Co. CEO Dishes | WaPo‘s MLK Snub


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Was ESPN Sloppy, Naïve or Compromised? (ESPN / Ombudsman)
So what’s more damaging to a corporate image: to be considered sloppy, naïve or compromised? Or all three? You get to pick in the wake of ESPN’s announcement that it was removing its brand from an upcoming two-part documentary by PBS’ Frontline that “reveals the hidden story of the NFL and brain injuries” (or so it claims in a controversial trailer). The ESPN action drew immediate media and mailbag accusations that the NFL had pressured the network into severing ties to the PBS films. I thought the best and briefest characterization came from Ombuddy Philip Berenbroick of Arlington, Va., who saw ESPN’s decision as an example of “the dueling journalism and profit motives [via protecting valued partners] at the network.” It’s hard to argue with that depiction. NYT ESPN’s divorce with PBS came a week after the NFL voiced its displeasure with the documentary at a lunch between league and ESPN executives, according to two people with direct knowledge of the situation. The meeting took place at Patroon, near the league’s Midtown Manhattan headquarters, according to the two people, who requested anonymity because they were prohibited by their superiors from discussing the matter publicly. It was a table for four: Roger Goodell, commissioner of the NFL; Steve Bornstein, president of the NFL Network; John Skipper, ESPN’s president; and John Wildhack, ESPN’s executive vice president for production. Deadline Hollywood The League Of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis trailer was screened at an Aug. 6 media panel and unveiled without Skipper’s or ESPN’s approval. Skipper complained the video was “sensational” and made him “quite unhappy.” He didn’t like the tagline, “Get ready to change the way you see the game,” or the trailer’s final quote from a neuropathologist on the extent of brain injuries in the NFL, “I’m really wondering if every single football player doesn’t have this.” Media watchers say pressure from the NFL led to ESPN’s sudden withdrawal and now Skipper admits he was embarrassed by the Frontline documentary. HuffPost In the wake of a report that ESPN bowed out of a joint investigative project with PBS on NFL player concussions, the union representing players said it was a “disappointing day for journalism” if the sports network caved on the series out of business concerns. “I think any time that business interests get in the way of telling an important story like the one Frontline was working on, I think that that’s a sad day, regardless of why or who or what the circumstances were,” George Atallah, spokesman for the NFL Players Association, told HuffPost. CJR / Full-Court Press Whatever the case, it looks bad for both parties. The NFL is being sued over its decades of “Don’t worry, it’s just a bruise” approach to medicine, a personal-injury lawsuit that has expanded to some 4,500 plaintiffs. Reports of the kind broadcast by ESPN and PBS not only damage the league’s brand equity, but have the potential to inflict further direct damages in existing and potential lawsuits. That’s not the sort of benefits promised by a broadcast partner when it agrees to pay more than a billion dollars in rights fees to the NFL.

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