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Posts Tagged ‘fashion’

Ryan Seacrest Launches Clothing Line

Ryan Seacrest, the 39-year-old American Idol host, TV producer and radio personality, is taking on the fashion world. The Wall Street Journal reports that Seacrest is launching his own clothing line, which will debut in over 100 Macy’s this fall.

Now, normally we’d poke fun at yet another media personality thinking that they can do anything they want. However, Seacrest’s idea actually sounds good!

The line features a matching system called “Style made Smart.” Each piece comes with a numbered tag — one through four —which indicates its color family. So all you have to do is combine matching numbers, and boom! You know you’ve got a good outfit going. Pretty cool, right?

Okay, we admit, that’s probably way more than you wanted to know about Seacrest’s clothing line. We promise no more fashion posts today. Maybe.

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How Elle‘s Joe Zee Broke Into Fashion (and How You Can Too)


In his over 20 years in the fashion business, Elle creative director Joe Zee has worked for such titles as Details and Allure and styled advertising campaigns for companies like Gap and DKNY. And, in our Media Beat interview, the Toronto native and star of Sundance Channel’s All On the Line with Joe Zee was very clear about how he got to the top.

One: he worked for people he could learn from, namely legendary fashion stylist and editor Polly Mellen. (“She taught me what it was like to have a passion for something.”)

And, two, he worked his butt off. “I won’t put stock in people who tell me they wanna work in fashion, because they wanna be glamorous. They wanna be famous. They wanna be well known,” he said. “If you wanna be those things, wrong business.”

Part 1: Elle‘s Joe Zee Puts It All on the Line for Sundance Channel
Part 2: Elle‘s Joe Zee Reveals Exactly What a Magazine Creative Director Does

Elle‘s Joe Zee Puts It All on the Line for L.A. Fashion

For two seasons of Sundance Channel‘s All on the Line with Joe Zee, Elle creative director Joe Zee was part mentor, part professor and part psychologist for struggling fashion designers. But, for Season 3, Zee said it was time to shake things up a bit.

“We had done seasons one and two in New York, and not that it’s tapped out, but it’s time to sort of really grow what the series can be about,” he explained in our Media Beat interview. “And I think West Coast fashion has really sort of evolved in terms of what the importance of it has been in the past few years. And also this is the world I live in. The celebrity culture in America is huge and only getting bigger, and what someone wears on the red carpet, on television, or in the media can ultimately change a struggling designer’s business.”

So, how much does Zee’s on-screen persona align with the real thing? All of it, he says.

“The reality is we do what we do, because I am authentic in that position. I don’t do it because of the cameras. I don’t do it for any heightened drama. I do it because I really believe in it.”

Part 2: Elle‘s Joe Zee Reveals Exactly What a Magazine Creative Director Does
Part 3: How Elle‘s Joe Zee Broke Into Fashion (and How You Can Too)

Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

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In the final segment of our Media Beat interview with Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley, the print vet talked about the explosion of street style, where women can find designer goods (or versions of them) for cheap, and that hot-button issue every magazine editor grapples with: Photoshop.

Sure, a petition against Seventeen has the pub pledging to feature more “healthy, real women,” but is it even possible for a magazine to succeed without airbrushing its models? Uh, no, said Holley.

“I’ve done a bunch of focus groups, and women will constantly say, ‘Why don’t you just put a real person on the cover? I don’t wanna see a celebrity.’ That cover would sell 10 copies,” said Holley. “So, what women say they want and what they want are two different things sometimes. I mean, we do need to show more women with real bodies, absolutely. But I don’t think that should be a dead set rule.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

They say if you can’t beat ‘em join ‘em… or, do one better and let ‘em eat off your plate. That’s Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley‘s approach to the Web.

In the second installment of our Media Beat interview, Holley, who once headed Yahoo! Shine, said she realized pretty early that the days of finding new readers “on the back of a CVS newsstand somewhere” are over.

“Fashion blogging, to me, is the most exciting thing that’s happened in publishing in decades. It’s really created a new tier of content, and you can either separate yourself from that content or you can bring it in,” she explained. “One way that we bring it in is we have a desk where bloggers can come in and sit — they’re called our Lucky Style Collective — they contribute content to the magazine; they contribute certainly online. So, it’s a sharing of pockets of audience.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 3: Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

June Ambrose on How to Become a Fashion Stylist

Follow the conversations @juneambrose has with her “style socials” (or Twitter followers to you and me), and one thing becomes clear: people either want to dress like her or be her. So, in the final installment of our Media Beat interview, we got the celebrity stylist and star of VH1′s Styled by June to tell us the biggest mistake aspiring stylists make on the job.

“[A lack of] Osmosis. You know, sometimes, just sitting back and just sucking it all in, you learn so much,” Ambrose said. “When you’re new on the scene, I’ll definitely ask you trick questions just to kinda see where you are. Humility is your best aspect when you’re entering a new area, and I learned that. I would just sit around and just listen.”

But what about fashion courses — are they worth it? And how does a newbie afford the clothes necessary for editorial shoots? Watch the full video to find out.

Part 1: June Ambrose on Styling Diddy, Jay-Z and Hip-Hop’s Most Iconic Videos
Part 2: June Ambrose on Her New VH1 Show, Styled by June
Bonus! Stylist June Ambrose on Her Trademark Turban

June Ambrose on How to Become a Fashion Stylist

Follow the conversations @juneambrose has with her “style socials” (or Twitter followers to you and me), and one thing becomes clear: people either want to dress like her or be her. So, in the final installment of our Media Beat interview, we got the celebrity stylist and star of VH1′s Styled by June to tell us the biggest mistake aspiring stylists make on the job.

“[A lack of] Osmosis. You know, sometimes, just sitting back and just sucking it all in, you learn so much,” Ambrose said. “When you’re new on the scene, I’ll definitely ask you trick questions just to kinda see where you are. Humility is your best aspect when you’re entering a new area, and I learned that. I would just sit around and just listen.”

But what about fashion courses — are they worth it? And how does a newbie afford the clothes necessary for editorial shoots? Watch the full video to find out.

Part 1: June Ambrose on Styling Diddy, Jay-Z and Hip-Hop’s Most Iconic Videos
Part 2: June Ambrose on Her New VH1 Show, Styled by June
Bonus! Stylist June Ambrose on Her Trademark Turban

June Ambrose on Her New VH1 Show, Styled by June

On VH1′s Styled By June, premiering March 19, celebrity stylist June Ambrose shows how she and her team at Mode Squad, Inc. take stars like Jaleel White, Mischa Barton and Aubrey O’Day from ho-hum to haute. But considering Ambrose has been working her magic for over 20 years, what took her so long to jump into TV?

“It was about finding the right voice,” Ambrose explained in our Media Beat interview. “It is a formatted show, and I think that’s what’s going to surprise everyone. It’s not just this random reality of my life. You’re in my ‘Juniverse,’ yes, but in that ‘Juniverse,’ I take you through the process. I have this very strategic process that I take with each client every week. I break it down into three steps, and in that three steps you’re going to get to see the beginning, a middle and the end of emancipating, or redefining, them through a new look.”

We also got the fashionista to dish about her new eyewear line with Selima Optique and what fans can expect from her upcoming women’s collection.

Part 1:June Ambrose on Styling Diddy, Jay-Z and Hip-Hop’s Most Iconic Videos
Part 3: June Ambrose on How to Become a Fashion Stylist
Bonus! June Ambrose on Her Trademark Turban

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June Ambrose on Styling Diddy, Jay-Z and Hip-Hop’s Most Iconic Videos

Whether showing that turbans can be chic or sending the paps into a tizzy just by entering Jay-Z and Beyonce‘s TriBeCa crib, June Ambrose often has the fashion world falling at her feet. And she single-handedly upgraded hip-hop’s street corner image with her innovative approach to music videos. (See this and this.)

In our Media Beat interview, Ambrose explained how she tapped into her West Indian roots for one of her most iconic looks: those shiny suits donned by Diddy and Mase in Notorious B.I.G‘s posthumous “Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems” clip.

“I showed [Diddy] the red metallic and he said, ‘I am not wearing that.’ I had to make one red leather outfit and one metallic leather outfit and… I won!” the star of VH1′s Styled by June said.

“You have to go into this business very fearless, and you have to have integrity for what you do… I said to him, ‘You have to just trust me. I know that sounds wild, but I put my career on this moment. I’m telling you it will make a huge difference.’ Once he saw the first take and he looked at playback, he looked at me and said ‘okay.’ And that was the beginning of not only a great working relationship, but a great friendship.”

Part 2:June Ambrose on Her New VH1 Show, Styled by June
Part 3: June Ambrose on How to Become a Fashion Stylist
Bonus! June Ambrose on Her Trademark Turban

Subscribe to mediabistroTV on YouTube.

Stylist June Ambrose on Her Trademark Turban

We sat down with celebrity stylist June Ambrose for Media Beat recently to talk about her work as a celebrity stylist, how other fashionistas can break into the biz, and what to expect from her upcoming VH1 show, Styled By June.

The full interview airs Monday, March 5, but here’s a bonus clip where Ambrose tells how she came up with her trademark turban.

“People would tweet and say, ‘Oh, black women can’t pull off a turban. They end up looking like mammy dolls.’ Oh really?” Ambrose said. “I’ll show you how it’s done.”

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Watch the full interview with June Ambrose:
Part 1:June Ambrose on Styling Diddy, Jay-Z and Hip-Hop’s Most Iconic Videos
Part 2: June Ambrose on Her New VH1 Show, Styled by June
Part 3: June Ambrose on How to Become a Fashion Stylist

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