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Posts Tagged ‘Financial Times’

Another Year, Another Staged China Prime Minister Press Conference

NTYSinosphereLogoEvery March in the Great Hall of the People near Tiananmen Square in Beijing, a live-TV press conference with the Prime Minister of China caps an annual conference known as the National People’s Congress. And as New York Times Beijing bureau reporter Andrew Jacobs notes, every year it’s the same bogus drill:

But unbeknownst to many people in China, all the questions had been vetted in advance, with foreign reporters and Foreign Ministry officials having negotiated over what topics were permissible, and then how the acceptable questions would be phrased.

This year CNN, Reuters, CNBC, The Associated Press and the Financial Times were among the outlets permitted to ask questions. Most of those who covered the event agreed it was a lackluster affair, without even a nugget of bona fide news.

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Financial Times Gives Matthew Garrahan a Major Promotion

MatthewGarrahanHeadshotMatthew Garrahan, the Financial Times‘ Los Angeles correspondent, is heading east. Sometime this summer, the well-liked journalist will relocate to New York to complete his transition to the position of the paper’s global media editor.

Effective February 1, Garrahan will oversee the paper’s coverage of media, marketing and entertainment, managing a global team of correspondents. From today’s announcement:

“Matt has been an outstanding reporter in Hollywood for the Financial Times, consistently delivering front page scoops and deeper reportage on the entertainment industry,” said FT editor Lionel Barber. “He is a highly respected media observer and his move to New York as our media editor is a natural next step. He will be a superb leader in this vital beat.”

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Charles Townsend on Steering the Condé Nast Ship

CharlesTownsendThumbEmily Steel, who covers the marketing and media beats for the Financial Times, recently had the opportunity to sit down with 69-year-old Condé Nast chief executive officer Charles Townsend. The resulting feature is perfect MLK Monday holiday reading.

Townsend, a past commodore of the New York Yacht Club who named his own vessel Current Issue, sounds like he’s describing some very bad sailing weather when he talked to Steel about the past few years at the Condé Nast helm (he came on board in 2004). Challenges come “from every direction” and the horizon is “so different now.”

Townsend tells Steel that he loves it when creative director Anna Wintour previews upcoming issues with him. He also notes that the publishing company was a little late to the Internet party:

Townsend admits that it has taken a long time for Condé Nast to develop the right attitude towards the Web. “We did it the hard way,” he says. “We learnt with black eyes and bloody noses.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Jim Roberts to Mashable | Financial Times Subs Up | 3 Plead Guilty to Hacking

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Mashable Names Jim Roberts to Oversee Content Expansion (NYT)
Mashable, the digital media site, said Wednesday morning that it had hired Jim Roberts as executive editor and chief content officer, part of its push to expand the range of its content. Mashable’s announcement comes as many digital websites are looking to deepen their content by adding professional journalists in foreign bureaus and on investigative teams. Roberts spent much of his career at The New York Times, where he most recently served as assistant managing editor before taking a company buyout in January. He then worked briefly at Reuters. In both jobs, Roberts championed a digital strategy that included using interactive tools, social media and video to augment traditional storytelling techniques. paidContent The news about Roberts — whose most recent job was trying to reinvent Reuters online, until the wire service company decided to mothball the venture — came as a surprise to many, since he is a veteran newsman and Mashable is seen by some as a pageview-driven source of entertainment rather than a place that does serious journalism. Mashable Roberts: “Although this is the beginning of a new journey, it also feels like the natural progression for an editor who loves the news and loves even more the opportunity to experiment with new and innovative ways of spreading it to an audience — and growing that audience in the process.” FishbowlNY Roberts joins editor-in-chief Lance Ulanoff and a Web braintrust that includes Adam Ostrow, Mike Kriak, Stacy Martinet, Robyn Peterson and Seth Rogin.

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Financial Times Adds VP of Communities

StacyMarieIshmaelTwitterPicIt’s always a sign of confidence in an employee when a new role is essentially created for them. It happened recently at AP, as we reported, with Paul Cheung. Another example of this phenomenon is the Financial Times‘ newly installed VP of communities Stacy-Marie Ishmael.

Among other things, Ishmael previously helped establish a New York presence for FT‘s “Alphaville” blog. Per an interview with journalism.co.uk reporter Alastair Reid, that’s where she really got a sense of just how much digital journalism has become a conversation:

“[At "Alphaville"] we had drinks with our readers and engaged in lots of debates with them and it made us all better journalists,” she said, “because it made us more responsive to what people are talking about, what they are interested in, what’s resonating with them.”

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Bloomberg Professional To Carry Financial Times

2010 has been a banner year for the Financial Times.  The London-based business paper introduced their iPad app in May and is steadily approaching one million subscribers with a paywall model that has kept both profits and circulation numbers high.  Now FT is closing out the year by announcing that they will offer customers with a corporate license access to their newspaper through Bloomberg Professional service.

Nearly 300,000 Bloomberg subscribers will be able to connect with FT and, according to a company statement, over 900 corporate customers have already signed up through several third party providers.  Although only premium or corporate members are granted unlimited access to FT content, Bloomberg Professional users that do not have an FT license will be able to view headlines for articles that link directly to the Financial Times main page.  FT managing director B2B Caspar de Bono notes that the partnership with Bloomberg adds another platform to reach FT‘s professional reader base:

This agreement opens up another large and hugely significant channel to the FT and means that the mutual customers of the FT and the Bloomberg Professional service will have instant access to the FT’s news and analysis to help them make more informed decisions.  The FT aims to make its content available wherever our customers choose to access it, whether that’s in print, on a mobile or via the Bloomberg Professional service.

Financial Times iPad App Paying Major Dividends

The Financial Times introduced the world to their iPad application in May.  Less than six months and 400,000 subscribers later, the app has brought in over one million British pounds or roughly $1.6 million for those of you that do not have a universal currency converter on hand. 

At today’s MediaGuardian Changing Advertising Summit in London, FT‘s global commercial director, Ben Hughes, explained the methods behind the paper’s digital success:

“My job is to make the FT brand sweat.  Print [advertising] isn’t dead but media owners are just having to find new ways to put [different models] together.”

Hughes also noted that traditional print advertising has taken a backseat to digital ventures and generates only 40% of FT‘s total revenue.  The business newspaper’s iPad app accounts for 10% of FT‘s new digital subscriptions.

Local News Outlets Cover Times Pay Wall Plans

nyt logo.jpgThe New York Times announcement yesterday about plans to launch a pay wall model on its Web site next year, wasn’t just a big story for the media — it was also a big story for New York City.

Appropriately enough, New York’s media was on the case, with NY1 and others reporting the breaking news.

The New York Times will make you pay,” started Keith Kelly‘s story in The New York Post today, “Times online pinch”. “The Times announced yesterday that it will end its free-for-all online service and start charging to read complete articles.”

New York-based Henry Blodget, CEO and editor-in-chief of The Business Insider even sounded off, calling it “the right move.”

And New York magazine’s Daily Intel blog, which first published word of the Times metered pay wall plans, said the announcement had nothing to do with Apple’s expected announcement of its new tablet device next week, as rumored. “[D]espite the fevered speculation of just what the Apple device might be, publishers like the Times are taking a revised view about the tablet’s potential to reinvent their digital businesses,” reporter Gabriel Sherman said.

Sherman also quizzed Rob Grimshaw, of the Financial Times to see what the Times metering system might look like.

Read more: Times online pinchNew York Post

Why the Times Is Wary of an Apple Tablet DealNew York magazine

So Blodget, What Do You Think Of This Paywall Decision By The New York Times? –Business Insider

Previously: NYTimes.com Pay Wall: Media CEOs, Editors And Bloggers Weigh In

Bloomberg, News Corp. Not Interested In BusinessWeek

businessweek.pngYesterday, the big news in the magazine industry was McGraw-Hill‘s decision to put BusinessWeek up for sale. Bloomberg broke the story in the morning, and by the afternoon BusinessWeek‘s own media reporter, Jon Fine, had weighed in.

According to Fine, “McGraw-Hill had held discussions earlier this year with Bloomberg regarding a sale of BusinessWeek,” but the newswire passed. Then Bloomberg became the first news organization to report the sale.

Today, the Financial Times reported that the sale of BusinessWeek might only fetch $1 for McGraw-Hill and weighed the possible buyers.

“Industry members and bankers said it was unlikely that Time Warner’s Time Inc., publisher of Fortune, or Forbes would bid for a competitor while facing similar challenges themselves,” FT said. “Among the few groups investing in print media, bankers pointed to Bloomberg, which has recruited new management for an aggressive expansion of its financial magazine, Bloomberg Markets, and Bonnier, which has become a top-10 U.S. publisher through acquisitions…a Bonnier spokesman said it had always favored niche acquisitions. A spokesman for News Corp., owner of the Wall Street Journal and Barron’s, said it was not interested in BusinessWeek.”

As the Journal pointed out in its story about the possible sale today, it is not an easy market for business magazines right now. So who, if anyone, is going to step up and buy a flagging BusinessWeek?

Earlier: BusinessWeek On The Block?

Web Journalists To Debate Business Model At Upcoming Mediabistro Panel

keyboard.jpgNext week, mediabistro will be hosting a panel that will discuss how social media is changing the face of journalism, whether an online business model is on the horizon and what that business model may look like.

We suspect this panel, moderated by BusinessWeek media columnist Jon Fine, will be similar to last week’s Reuters <a href="panel or this week’s Gotham Media panel about the media in crisis. However, while Reuters and Gotham Media offered insight from “old media” editors like Lawrence Ingrassia from The New York Times, the Financial TimesChrystia Freeland and Andrew Edgecliff-Johnson and Air America‘s Bennett Zier, next week’s panel will have a distinctive point of view from panelists with vast online experience including NYU journalism professor and blogger Jay Rosen, Mediaite.com Editor at Large Rachel Sklar, blogger Maeghan Carberry and former Star-Ledger staffer Matt Romanoski, who helped found NewJerseyNewsroom.com.

In the hopes of learning a little bit more about what this panel will focus on, we picked moderator Fine’s brain for a bit. “There isn’t an answer,” Fine said of the ever elusive online business model question for media companies. “But if you can get people to pay for something you’re in good shape.”

Expect panelists to wrestle with this conundrum, offer suggestions and advice and describe their own experiences. It all goes down July 16.

(Photo via flickr)

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