TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Frank Bruni’

NY Times Staffers on What Makes a Good Editor

NYtimes buildingWhat makes a good editor? It’s a simple question that can be answered in a variety of ways. It’s completely subjective, of course, but it’s always interesting to hear what people think. The New York Times, as part of its Times Premier package, asked some of its staffers for their thoughts, and below are some highlights.

David Carr:

A good editor is the enemy of clichés and tropes, but not the overburdened writer who occasionally resorts to them.

Frank Bruni:

A great editor makes you feel safe and supported enough to take chances, but pipes up when you’re taking a truly stupid one.

Gretchen Morgenson:

She or he stands behind the reporter throughout any firestorm that ensues. A spine of steel is imperative.

Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Frank Bruni is a Nice Person

Frank Bruni is the type of guy who will return your lost phone if he happens to find it. Our only beef with this is that he could’ve just tweeted directly to her. Instead, he let all his followers know about it.

Okay fine, we’d probably do that too.

In any case, Love saw his tweet and replied, “Frank you’re a gem, what a small world can we exchange dms?”

In this way, life will go on.

GLAAD Announces Media Award Finalists

The finalists for the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media Awards have just been announced. The awards are given annually to “recognize and honor media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community and the issues that affect their lives.”

While none of our local newspapers were nominated, Frank Bruni of the New York Times is up for Outstanding Newspaper Columnist. Below are the New York based magazine finalists, but congrats to all those who received recognition.

The New York award ceremony will be held March 16, at the Marriott Marquis.

Outstanding Magazine, Overall Coverage:

New York
People
Seventeen
The Advocate/Out
The New Yorker

Outstanding Magazine, Article:

Read more

Gawker Continues its Assault on Frank Bruni

For some reason, some of Gawker’s writers absolutely hate Frank Bruni, the New York Times columnist. The site has labeled him as one of “10 people who should quit media,” someone who once wrote “the most boring story ever told” and more. Is his writing that bad or is there maybe some jealousy involved? Hahaha! There’s no way it would be the latter! That would just be… Well, anyway.

Today at Gawker, John Cook has some more choice words for Bruni’s recent work, in which Bruni tells the story of a doctor friend who performs an abortion on a pro life activist who has intensely protested outside of the doctor’s office. Cook thinks it’s too good to be true, and asks a bunch of questions like how the pro-lifer could have slipped past her protesting friends and why the protestor chose the same clinic she frequently attacked to have the procedure.

Read more

The New York Times’ ‘Sunday Review’ to Debut June 26th

The wait for the new look “Week in Review” section in the Sunday New York Times is over: It will debut June 26th. And like everyone thought, it’s going to be called “Sunday Review.” According to a memo received by Poynter, select members of the press will be getting a sneak preview of it the Wednesday prior to its launch. Here’s a look at the memo:

We’re holding an informal press breakfast next Thursday, June 23 where we will offer a sneak peak at our newest section, Sunday Review. Sunday Review will offer new features and a new way of presenting our finest analytical and opinion writing; it will debut on Sunday, June 26.

We’ll have a prototype of the section on hand and more information to share. Editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal, op-ed editor Trish Hall, executive editor Bill Keller and columnist Frank Bruni will all be there.

There you have it. We can all relax now and get on with our lives. Okay, we’re lying, FishbowlNY really wants to see what the new section looks like, so this is kind of exciting. What can we say? We’re simple people with simple pleasures.

 

Frank Bruni to be First Gay Op-Ed Columnist in The New York Times’ History

Frank Bruni – a writer for The New York Times since 1995 – has been named an Op-Ed columnist. The move was announced by Andy Rosenthal as part of the much discussed Week in Review section revamp.

According to Rosenthal, Bruni’s column will offer an “opinionated look at a big event of the last week, from a different or unexpected angle, or a small event that was really important but everyone seems to have missed.” Bruni will contribute work for the print section as well as an online column.

Bruni will be the Times’ first openly gay Op-Ed columnist, an honor we’re sure he’s extremely proud of.

Bruni said of joining the Opinion Pages:

I’m excited and really grateful. At The Times and beforehand, I’ve been lucky to be able to write about many different topics, and I’m eager to take on a job that will allow me to range across most or all of them in a reflective, analytical and sometimes — I hope — spirited way.

Frank Bruni Discusses His Writing Habits, Other Subjects

Poytner caught up with Frank Bruni for a quick interview today, and it’s worth a read. Fittingly, Bruni covers a wide variety of subjects. Below are a couple of our favorite quotes.

On the state of print:

It’s sad to me that magazines and newspapers have hit hard times. Their information and entertainment value is incredible. Maureen Dowd has always said, of the Times, where else can you get that much value for that little money? And she’s right. Compare it to a movie ticket, or even to a sandwich. It’s a lot less than either, and more nutritious!

Noted: The New York Times > ham on rye.

And here’s what Bruni does before writing an article:

I do what I think most journalists do: I read up. Quickly and extensively. I get clips, I bop around the Internet. I also tend to do a lot of background reporting that may not lead to actual quotes but that informs stories and maybe enables me to write with more certainty and confidence.

Research and reading! Not rocket science, just good advice.

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

Read more

Editorial Changes At NYT: Corbett Named Standards Editor, Landman To Lead Culture

Jonathan Landman.jpgNew York Times executive editor Bill Keller has announced two new changes atop the editorial staff at the paper, starting with the announcement yesterday that Deputy News Editor Phil Corbett will be taking on the role of associate managing editor for standards next month after Craig Whitney retires.

“In that role, Phil will become the newsroom’s voice for all standards and ethics questions relating to content and news coverage, both in the printed newspaper and on the Web,” Keller said in a memo to staff. “This includes responsibility — along with Greg Brock — for dealing with corrections and editors’ notes, as well as questions from the Public Editor. He will also be the teller’s window for vetting conflict of interest and other policy rules outlined in the handbook on Ethical Journalism.”

Then today, Keller announced to the Times staff that Deputy Managing Editor Jonathan Landman (right) would be taking over the culture editor role vacated by Sam Sifton last month when he was picked to take up Frank Bruni‘s restaurant critic beat.

Keller called Landman’s selection a “no-brainer,” and noted that as he steps away from his role overseeing the Times‘s digital newsroom, the paper’s other leaders (including Keller himself) will have to focus more heavily on the Web:

“In proposing this change, Jon made a strong case that, in the next stage of integration, the support and promotion of this new kind of journalism must become more fully the responsibility of the newsroom’s top leadership — me, [managing editor Jill Abramson] and [managing editor John Geddes]. He reminded me that in the original proposal for an integrated newsroom — May, 2005 — I insisted that it is not enough to create new advocates for Web journalism within the NYT newsroom; the newsroom would be truly integrated only when the top editors took as much responsibility for our digital journalism as they do for the more traditional kind. We’ve stopped a little short of that ambition, in large part because we had Jon to defer to and depend on. We’ll have more to say on this important subject, but the main thing to say now is that Jill and I, in particular, see this as time to rearrange our priorities and devote more of our bandwidth to digital journalism.”

Said Landman in an announcement about his move today:

“It’s time for the newsroom to take the next step toward full integration, to put management of Web journalism and print in the same hands. That’s how we’ll be able to do the ambitious work we want to do.”

Read more of Keller’s memos about both Corbett and Landman here.

After the jump, the press release from the Times today announcing Landman’s appointment.

(Photo courtesy of The New York Times)

Read more

As He Heads Out The Door, Bruni Gives Insider Tips

bruni nightline.jpgAs Frank Bruni prepares to hang up his napkin and turn over his New York Times restaurant critic mantle to Sam Sifton, he was left with just a few loose ends to tie up.

“I’m using my last column as The Times‘s restaurant critic to correct lapses, attend to unfinished business, rummage through a cupboard of leftover advice and opine on an array of matters that didn’t come up often, or at all, in other articles,” he explained.

The advice that follows about how to manage the restaurant landscape in New York City is priceless. Bruni opines on where to get the best sushi and steak in the city, some favorites from recent visits, where to find value and some underrated restaurants.

We particularly love his advice about to navigate a menu:

“Scratch off the appetizers and entrees that are most like dishes you’ve seen in many other restaurants, because they represent this one at its most dutiful, conservative and profit-minded. The chef’s heart isn’t in them.

Scratch off the dishes that look the most aggressively fanciful. The chef’s vanity — possibly too much of it — spawned these.

Then scratch off anything that mentions truffle oil.

Choose among the remaining dishes.”

We’ll miss your epic appetite and well-seasoned wit, Bruni.

Good Tips at the End of His Meals New York Times

Earlier: Former NYT Restaurant Critic Reviews Choco Taco On Nightline

NEXT PAGE >>