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Posts Tagged ‘freelance writing’

Earn $1.50 A Word And Up At This Parenting Mag

AmericanBabyAmerican Baby magazine has been doling out mothering advice since 1938, and it’s not stopping anytime soon. The monthly pub’s key demographic these days are first-time millennial moms seeking advice on everything baby related.

The mag’s content is 50 percent freelance written and their various online counterparts, including Parenting.com, are in need of fresh content. The pub’s editors dish on the coverage they’re looking for:

American Baby is specifically targeted to the first-time, millennial mom in her 20s to early 30s, and that focus has a large impact on the book’s style and tone. “We’re very modern about our approach to having a baby, and I think that’s reflected in the writing,” says Mindy Walker, American Baby’s executive editor. “It’s very friendly, but we also use a lot of authority. We don’t dumb it down for the reader; we keep it very direct and approachable.”

To learn more about how to get published in this pub, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: American Baby.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $2 A Word At This Women’s Lifestyle Pub

RealSimpleReal Simple bills itself as the go-to mag for the busy woman looking for solutions to simplify her life. The pub’s scope is broad, covering everything from food and health issues to parenting, beauty, decor and more.

The mag is 60 percent freelance written and also has a thriving online presence. So what’s the best way to get your foot in the door at this popular service pub?

 Though most of Real Simple is pitchable, the FOB is particularly freelancer friendly. Naturally, deputy editor Noelle Howey advises new freelancers to start there. For “Health,” editors are looking for a wide range of topics: Nutrition, fitness, hygiene, metabolism, weight loss, skincare and more are all covered here and, if you can weave a pitch that tackles multiple health-related subjects at once, even better. “Family” is another good place for freelancers to break in, and editors are looking for pieces about how to manage family and relationship dynamics.

For more information on how to get published in this mag, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: Real Simple.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 A Word At Cosmopolitan for Latinas

CosmopolitanLatinasCosmopolitan for Latinas is a relatively new mag, but it has the advantage of a built-in audience that is already familiar with the Cosmopolitan brand. The twist is that this glossy is dedicated to all things Latina.

As managing editor Jessica Rodriguez says: “[We want] to be able to talk to [Latinas] about fashion and beauty and all of the issues and particular nuances about their bi-cultural lives.” The pub is in need of writers for their lifestyle, health and entertaining features, among others:

Editors at the mag assign out to freelancers, but there are a few sections of the book that are particularly friendly to pitches, too. “Real Talk,” a lifestyle section that weighs in on different issues, is one of them. Anything with a unique angle will catch the editors’ eyes here, and a good example is a piece called “I Won’t Date a Latin Guy.”

To learn more about how to get published in this mag, including the editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Cosmopolitan for Latinas.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 A Word and Up at This Foodie Pub

EatingWell

EatingWell strives to be the place ‘where good taste meets good health.’ This food-centric pub is all about healthy recipes, nutrition news and interesting narratives on the origins of our food.

The mag is looking for investigative pieces on nutrition and science-based articles on subjects like food sustainability. New writers who manage to break into the book often establish fruitful relationships with editors there:

Features need to be well researched and thorough; a news angle or a hook to a trend also helps. “Nourish” is an essay column about how food nourishes us in unexpected ways. It is open to top literary talent as well as new writers. Travel stories are welcomed only if they have a clear tie-in to health and come with easy recipes that meet the EatingWell nutrition guidelines. What the editors prefer are pitches in which the writer can show a personal connection to a particular locale and its cuisine.

For editors’ contact info and more tips on breaking into the book, read: How To Pitch: EatingWell.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How To Negotiate Pay Increases as a Freelancer

LifeAsAFreelancer

Becoming a freelancer full time can be an overwhelming undertaking. The reliability of your old job is long gone, replaced with a constant need to hustle for work.

And that’s not even going into the money issue. Freelancers often deal with a fluctuating financial situation. Some months you be may have more clients than you know what to do with, other times — not so much.

That’s why it’s so important to know what your work is worth:

I’ve found editors rarely pay much in increases; they have a budget for stories and that’s that. However, if you’re a steady contributor, you may be able to finagle an extra $50 or so. If the work isn’t too demanding, it might be worth your while to keep this client. Or perhaps you can negotiate other benefits. For example, instead of all rights to the work, your client takes only one-time rights, so you can easily sell the work (and make money) elsewhere.

To get more advice on freelancing, read: Pros and Cons of Life as a Freelancer.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

News-Driven Stories Land $1.50 A Word At Outside

Outside

Outside is looking for writers with a sense of adventure. The monthly mag features articles on pop culture, news, science, tech, fitness and more. Although one might assume the audience is primarily snowboarding dudes from Aspen, Colo., that’s not entirely the case.

Yes, the mag’s audience is predominately male, but many readers are city dwellers longing for an escape. The pub is 70 percent freelance written, and their newly redesigned website is on the hunt for writers keen on fast-breaking news.

The mag’s senior editor Abe Streep tells what kind of stories make it in the mag:

“A pitch on the best hikes in the National Parks probably won’t get you far,” said Streep. But travel news that leads to actionable service — say, a story on how the Grand Canyon’s new permitting system for rafters affects readers — is very welcome. News that leads to service is the ideal: new lodges, new technology, new training tools. The magazine is focusing more and more on its core mission: inspiring adventure. “We’re still looking for pop-culture stories,” said Streep, “but only those that are a natural fit for Outside.”

For editors’ contact info and more, read: How To Pitch: Outside.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

What to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed

KilledStory

Let’s say you landed a pitch (hooray!) and after all the effort you put into the research, reporting and writing — the piece gets rejected. What’s your next move?

It can be hard to pick yourself up after your story gets killed. It’s easy to take it personally — but there are countless reasons why your story didn’t make it to publication, and it may have nothing to do with your writing. It could be a time issue, internal changes at the magazine or it could be a new editor who just doesn’t care for your topic.

The latest Mediabistro feature looks at what you should do when your hard work doesn’t make it into the book. Here’s an excerpt:

Be prepared to take responsibility for any shortcomings or misunderstandings. Most importantly, be able to learn from the situation. Not every editor is willing to be your mentor, but some are willing to give you feedback as to why something won’t or didn’t work. And whatever you do, don’t be overly apologetic. You’ll only appear desperate and needy to the editor, which doesn’t bode well if you hope to work with him or her again. I learned the hard way that editors simply don’t have patience for it. Instead, thank them for the opportunity and assure that you’ll apply the lessons from the experience to future assignments.

For more advice on how to move forward, read: 6 Things to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Compelling Narratives Land $1 A Word at Hemispheres

Hemispheres

United Airlines’ Hemispheres doesn’t like to think of itself as just another airline mag. For one thing, it reaches more than 12 million fliers a month, and has attracted big name writers like The New York TimesDavid Carr and Esquire‘s Tom Chiarella.

The pub’s content is 80 percent freelance, and they are always looking for new writers with strong ideas:

“I think of us as a general-interest magazine, as opposed to something that’s more strictly in the travel category,” said Jordan Heller, Hemispheres‘ new editor-in-chief. Yes, the mag’s signature “Three Perfect Days” feature is still there, which highlights the ideal weekend travel itinerary in destinations across the globe, but in keeping with the vision of the EICs who came before him, Heller leans toward the kind of informative, well-reported, non-niche journalism one might find in Vanity Fair or Men’s Journal.

To hear more tips and editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Hemispheres.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Monetize Your Blog

Everyone has a blog nowadays, but not everyone manages to make money from it. If you’ve managed to strike upon a large readership for your blog, thanks to breaking news or a great idea, your road to monetizing is far from over. Just because the masses come to you for info or entertainment does not mean advertisers will do the same, or that a book deal is in the bag. In the latest Mediabistro feature, Blair Koenig shares her experience from building a successful blog STFU, Parents, which gets 1.5 to 2 million page views a month:

When you’re building your own personal blog, it’s up to you to figure out how to make money — whether it’s from ad networks, independent advertisers, book deals, stores or through other media outlets. Koenig jokes, “I know there’s a lot out there that makes it sound like if you’re a popular blogger someone’s going to just ring your doorbell and be like, ‘Hey, I want to make a movie [based on your blog]!’ But it’s really, really hard and usually a lot of that stuff is created from the blogger [rather] than the other way around.”

Koenig uses three different ad networks and a couple of independent advertisers to earn money on her blog. She landed a book deal after completing the grueling process of writing a 60-page book proposal. She has plans to build a store within her website featuring STFU, Parents-themed merchandise as well. But money doesn’t suddenly start flowing in when your blog becomes popular, according to Koenig. She’s appeared on Good Morning America and various news outlets to talk about her blog, and although these appearances spike traffic to her site, she’s not getting paid outright for any publicity.

For more tips and advice on blogging, read What You Need to Know About Writing for Blogs.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Land $2 a Word for Innovative Articles at AARP

AARP The Magazine, one of the most successful magazines for the over 50 set, is looking for freelancers who have something meaningful to say. And despite their older clientele, the magazine is not only published in print, but also on tablets and online.

AARP has an enormous readership (its circulation is 22 million, yet it reaches an astounding 34 million people). Even better news: 60 percent of their content comes from freelance writers. Marilyn Milloy, deputy editor, explains the magazine’s mission:

Our greater mission is to redefine aging in America by showing that attitude, aspiration and actions are more relevant to quality of life than how old you are,” she said. “We don’t have direct competitors, but magazines in our competitive set would include Reader’s Digest, More, Prevention and Money. We overlap with all of them. But we’re unique because of our size and our laser focus on people over 50. These are the people who most matter to us, so we show their images and offer content based on where they are in their lives — whether it’s advising how to get the most from their healthcare dollars, their work, their travel or their grocery shopping.

For editors contact info and pitching etiquette, read How To Pitch: AARP The Magazine.

Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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