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Posts Tagged ‘freelancing’

Get Your Story Ideas Through Ebony’s Ample Pitch Box

Ebony-articleTopically speaking, nothing is off-limits when it comes to pitching Ebony, one of the oldest and few remaining print publications focusing on the black community.

What’s more important than what you pitch is how you pitch. The editors here appreciate short queries that show freelancers know the magazine well, including the particular section they are pitching. Bonus points if your pitch captures the interests of both genders:

Keep in mind, too, that Ebony’s content caters to both women and men. “I make sure that every story evokes the female and male perspective and mindset. We are a lifestyle publication in every aspect, from work to home to children to wellness. It’s about everything,” said [managing editor Wendy Wilson]. “I think we have an incredible opportunity to really focus on black men and no one else is paying attention to them.” Be inclusive in pitches because, ultimately, both guys and gals will be reading.

For more, including tips for specific sections, read: How To Pitch: Ebony

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Copy Editing: Intro

Copy Editing: IntroStarting January 6, learn basic copy editing skills using the AP Stylebook! In this course, you'll learn how to use dictionaries and online reference tools to edit work, ask the right questions to clarify convoluted copy, prepare for a copy editing test, and tailor your resume to find more work as a copy editor. Register now!

Get Your Pitch Accepted into NYMag.com’s Daily Roster of 150+ Posts

NYMag.com-articleNYMag.com, the online destination for New York magazine, covers news, culture, fashion and pyschology with the same witty, urbane voice that declared itself over four decades ago, epitomized by Tom Wolfe‘s legendary, novella-length “Radical Chic.”

There is no corner of NYMag.com closed to accepting a pitch, but to have a fair shot, you should heed the advice of deputy editor Jebediah Reed:

As a general rule, Reed suggested, “a freelance pitch should always bring something fresh to the table, something you have that other publications don’t and writers haven’t said or reported yet. Any pitch that does that, that brings something fresh and valuable and smart to the editor’s attention, is a good pitch.” Everything on the family of sites if pitchable and, with so many packages running at any given time, there’s a chance to not only be published, but also build a relationship with editors if your ideas are on point.

For more, including, which sections of the site are poised to expand, read: How To Pitch: NYMag.com

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Profiles and Photo Essays to New Lifestyle Magazine Oak Street

Oak-Street-articleMen’s clothing line Frank & Oak recently made a foray into the world of publishing with Oak Street magazine, whose 190-page introductory issue debuted this spring. The magazine both capitalizes on and reflects the interests of its global, creative, young professional base.

Freelancers are encouraged to pitch photo essays and FOB items as well as long-form features, which top out at 5,000 words. There’s good news for young writers trying to make a name for themselves:

[Editor-in-chief Ethan Song] said he welcomes pitches from writers of all experience levels. “We’re more interested in capturing the essence of a movement, and because younger writers are often living those movements, we enjoy hearing from them,” he explained.

For more, including the types of stories editors are on the lookout for, read How To Pitch: Oak Street 

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Poignant Personal Stories and Service Pieces to Brides

Brides-articleTurn wedding season into more than weekends spent at converted farmhouses and wages diverted to bridal registries and formal wear. If you can operate as both guest and reporter at these functions, you could have your piece make it to Brides’s “Real Weddings” section. Up your chances by pitching a story on a wedding whose bride and groom, or bride and bride, are underrepresented in the wedding magazine world.

Generally speaking, when pitching Condé Nast‘s 80-year-old bridal mag, you want to be different, but not too different:

Bottom line is your query will get a second look if it’s hitting on something that’s relatable and that you won’t find in every other bridal mag. Explained [executive editor Lauren Iannotti]: “It’s hard to find super new, fresh ideas that aren’t kooky and weird, and we’re challenged to do it all the time. So any fine reporter out there who can get that surprising service-y nugget that doesn’t come out of left field, that sort of feels real and great, we would love that.”

For more tips, including other sections ripe for pitching, read: How To Pitch: Brides

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Try Your Luck and Win $10-$50 OFF Freelancing 101

Mediabistro is introducing its newest boot camp: Freelancing 101. This four-week interactive online event starts April 28, and teaches students the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients.

With St. Patrick’s Day quickly approaching, Mediabistro is inviting you to try your luck with code GETLUCKY. Register with the promotional code and you could win anywhere from $10-$50 OFF your registration! Make sure to sign-up before 3/17 to redeem this offer! Read more

What to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed

KilledStory

Let’s say you landed a pitch (hooray!) and after all the effort you put into the research, reporting and writing — the piece gets rejected. What’s your next move?

It can be hard to pick yourself up after your story gets killed. It’s easy to take it personally — but there are countless reasons why your story didn’t make it to publication, and it may have nothing to do with your writing. It could be a time issue, internal changes at the magazine or it could be a new editor who just doesn’t care for your topic.

The latest Mediabistro feature looks at what you should do when your hard work doesn’t make it into the book. Here’s an excerpt:

Be prepared to take responsibility for any shortcomings or misunderstandings. Most importantly, be able to learn from the situation. Not every editor is willing to be your mentor, but some are willing to give you feedback as to why something won’t or didn’t work. And whatever you do, don’t be overly apologetic. You’ll only appear desperate and needy to the editor, which doesn’t bode well if you hope to work with him or her again. I learned the hard way that editors simply don’t have patience for it. Instead, thank them for the opportunity and assure that you’ll apply the lessons from the experience to future assignments.

For more advice on how to move forward, read: 6 Things to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Set Your Freelance Writing Rates

Being a freelancer comes with many perks: working from home, flexible hours and the ability to pick your own projects. But it can be difficult to figure out how much your work is worth. Should you have an hourly rate or a per-project one? New writers might want to accept a lower rate to build clips, but how do you know when a rate is too low? Is the project even worth your time?

In the latest Mediabistro feature, seasoned freelancers share their experiences, so you can learn from their mistakes and maximize the value of your work.

Freelancer Aubre Andrus says she set a salary goal for herself and calculates her hourly rate from there. For her, the fact that she isn’t working on income-generating tasks 40 hours a week was a determining factor.

“This rate helps me devise my per-project fee and helps me decide if a project is worth my time,” explained Andrus. That, along with tracking her monthly earnings, has helped her stay on target to attain her salary goal.

Read more in 4 Things to Consider When Setting Your Freelance Writing Rate. [subscription required]

Where’s The Best Place For Freelancers To Work In NYC?

coffee shop.jpgYesterday, a story we came across in The Wall Street Journal got us thinking: where do New York’s laptop-toting freelancers and bloggers like to work when they step out of their home offices?

Coffee shops, cafes, delis, libraries, book shops and even bars offer wireless Internet access, but it seems that more and more are making those of us looking for a place to work feel unwelcome. Wouldn’t it make your life easier if there was a list of the best places to work in the city?

Well, we’re on the case. Send us an email or leave a note in the comments letting us know your favorite laptop-friendly haunts. We’ll gather all your tips, take a trip there ourselves and compile the results for you. We’ll rank places based on quality and reliability of the Internet connection, friendliness of the staff, selection of coffee and snacks, access to electrical outlets, difficulty finding a place to sit, and any other factors we decide are important (if we missed anything, let us know).

We can’t wait to hear from you and start investigating the best places to work in the city.

Related: New York Coffee Shops Hate On Laptops