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Posts Tagged ‘Gabriel Sherman’

2011 Mirror Awards Winners

Today the Newhouse School of Public Communications held its annual Mirror Awards, which celebrates the best in media industry journalism. If it sounds a little absurd, well, it is. But as we know, every award is a little odd, so on with the winners!

Best Single Article, Traditional Media: Gabriel Sherman, “Chasing Fox”  (New York)
Best Single Article, Digital Media: Jim Hopkins, “All Shook Up” (Gannett Blog)
• Best Profile, Traditional Media: Ken Auletta, “The Networker” (The New Yorker)
• Best Profile, Digital Media: Joel Meares, “The Biggest Fish in Albany?” (Columbia Journalism Review)
• Best Commentary, Traditional MediaJames Wolcott (Vanity Fair)
Best Commentary, Digital MediaEric Alterman (Center for American Progress)
• Best In-depth Piece, Traditional Media: Mary Van de Kamp Nohl, “Paper Money” (Milwaukee Magazine)

Roger Ailes Unhappy with Sarah Palin

According to Gabriel Sherman, Roger Ailes advised Sarah Palin not to comment on the tradgedy involving Gabrielle Giffords, and when she did anyway, espcially in her typical “take brain out of head, place brain on table, then speak” way, it angered Ailes:

Ailes was not pleased with her decision, which turned out to be a political debacle for Palin, especially her use of the historically loaded term “blood libel” to describe the actions of the media. ‘The Tucson thing was horrible,’ said a person familiar with Ailes’s thinking. ‘Before she responded, she was making herself look like a victim. She was winning. She went out and did the blood libel thing, and Roger is thinking, ‘Why did you call me for advice?’

If this is true, and Palin deliberately went against the advice of the man who not only pays her a hefty salary, but pulls major weight in the Republican party, FishbowlNY would like to welcome Ailes to our WTF Palin? Club, which was formed years ago. We have t-shirts. We’ll send you one.

Gabriel Sherman to Write Book on Fox News

FishbowlNY is sure the picture on the right is sending chills up and down your spine, but we only posted it for a good reason: One of our favorite writers, Gabriel Sherman, just announced that he’s signed a deal with Random House to write a book about Fox News.

Sherman spoke to us last month about his profile on A.J. Daulerio, and we’ve always enjoyed his pieces in New York, so if you see him today, give him some dap and congratulate him. Unless you don’t know him personally, then maybe just tell him “congrats.” Actually, if you don’t know him, maybe just think “congrats” and keep walking, no need to be creepy.

More Drama at Harper’s

We’ve been following the fight between the union at Harper’s Magazine and its publisher, John “Rick” MacArthur, since Gabriel Sherman first wrote about it. Today, Sherman says that the magazine’s union has ratcheted up the rhetoric. It has sent out a letter signed by 84 writers – including powerhouses Zadie Smith and Jonathan Lethem – that asks MacArthur to reconsider the expected firing of editors Ben Metcalf and Ted Ross. Both Metcalf and Ross are part of the union, which was created to change the direction MacArthur was taking the magazine.

Aside from asking that the editorial staff remain intact, the letter also requests that MacArthur opens up the magazine to outside funding. It closes with a “thanks for everything but you’re doing it wrong” statement:

We truly appreciate the space Harper’s Magazine has provided for our work and the generosity and commitment you have demonstrated over the past three decades. But we fear that in a publishing climate as precarious as this one, acrimonious staff relations and sustained losses of editorial experience can imperil any magazine. We do not claim to know the intricacies of the magazine’s financial situation, but it is our firm belief that its future depends on employing editors and researchers who enjoy a strong, secure, and harmonious working environment.

Your move MacArthur.

Gabriel Sherman Discusses His Profile of Deadspin’s A.J. Daulerio

In the February issue of GQ, Gabriel Sherman profiles A.J. Daulerio, the Editor-in-Chief at Deadspin.com. We thought a blogger getting attention that is usually reserved for high-profile celebrities was noteworthy (editors note: Playgirl if you’re looking for someone to profile, I’m available), especially considering Daulerio’s irreverent style. We reached out to Sherman for his take on the piece, and he took the time to answer a few questions.

FBNY: GQ typically features celebrities – or at least people everyone knows about – but most people don’t know Daulerio. Do you think the decision to profile him means bloggers are becoming celebrities in their own right?

Sherman: I think the notion of someone being defined as a “blogger” is outdated. Blogs, such that they even exist anymore, are just a platform. The Internet has collapsed all forms of media into what we now call ‘content.’ A blog post competes for reader attention with television and 5,000-word magazine pieces and daily newspaper articles. Daulerio made for a fascinating profile subject because he’s had a major impact on two interconnected worlds: sports and media. That he happens to publish his content in blog form isn’t really central to what makes him a a compelling figure. Daulerio’s fearlessness, and controversial approach to reporting, are what make him interesting. It’s not about bloggers becoming celebrities per se. The question is really about someone having impact and driving a conversation, which A.J. has managed to do in a significant way, even if it means foisting penis photos on the rest of us.

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GQ Talks to The Man Behind Deadspin

A.J. Daulerio is the Editor-in-Chief of Deadspin.com, and if you’re looking for someone to blame because you now know that Brett Favre takes pictures of his own penis, he’s your man. In a GQ profile, Gabriel Sherman talks to Daulerio about what his reporting style has done for Deadspin (good things), journalism (not always good things) and Daulerio himself (mostly bad things).

It’s a great read, and sort of surprising to see in GQ. Typically, the magazine profiles people that everyone knows, but Daulerio doesn’t fall into that category. Though maybe after today he will.

Also, keep an eye out tomorrow for our interview with Sherman, where we’ll get his perspective on Daulerio and his effect on journalism.

Harper’s Publisher Battles Own Staff

Take one magazine publisher who hates the Internet, add some staffers who have unionized because of the owner’s shady moves, and what do you get? Nothing good.

Gabriel Sherman at The Daily Intel reports that there is plenty of chaos at Harper’s Magazine, where John MacArthur, owner/publisher of the title, and staffers are tangled in a dispute that will only get worse. Apparently staffers at the magazine decided to unionize in response to several moves MacArthur has made – including firing Roger Hodge, the mag’s former Editor-in-Chief who sought to protect staff from cuts, and MacArthur putting his own name above senior editors on the masthead. When MacArthur found out about the union, he wasn’t very pleased, and now the staff is even more worried:

The Harper’s union has been locked in a bitter contract dispute with MacArthur since July. And now he’s trying to lay off Harper’s’ literary editor, Ben Metcalf, who’s worked at the magazine since the mid-nineties and who played a key role in the union drive — a move the union says is pure retaliation.

Oh and yes, there’s that whole hating the Internet thing. MacArthur flat out refuses to believe that their rival, The Atlantic, finally posted a profit only because it concentrated on boosting its web presence.

But MacArthur should keep doing what he’s doing, we’re sure fighting against staff and declaring the Internet worthless is a great model for success.

UPDATE:

Kathy Park Price, VP of Public Relations for Harper’s, just emailed us to say that there were some inaccuracies in Sherman’s report. You can decide who to believe. Price says, “The union was certified to represent Harper’s in late October.  Also, Harper’s agreed to meet with the union immediately, and has since waited for the union to schedule a meeting to begin negotiations.  The negotiations began one week ago, on January 7.  Rick [MacArthur] never contested the staff’s right to unionize.  He contested the inclusion of certain senior editors in the unit as being part of management.”

Local News Outlets Cover Times Pay Wall Plans

nyt logo.jpgThe New York Times announcement yesterday about plans to launch a pay wall model on its Web site next year, wasn’t just a big story for the media — it was also a big story for New York City.

Appropriately enough, New York’s media was on the case, with NY1 and others reporting the breaking news.

The New York Times will make you pay,” started Keith Kelly‘s story in The New York Post today, “Times online pinch”. “The Times announced yesterday that it will end its free-for-all online service and start charging to read complete articles.”

New York-based Henry Blodget, CEO and editor-in-chief of The Business Insider even sounded off, calling it “the right move.”

And New York magazine’s Daily Intel blog, which first published word of the Times metered pay wall plans, said the announcement had nothing to do with Apple’s expected announcement of its new tablet device next week, as rumored. “[D]espite the fevered speculation of just what the Apple device might be, publishers like the Times are taking a revised view about the tablet’s potential to reinvent their digital businesses,” reporter Gabriel Sherman said.

Sherman also quizzed Rob Grimshaw, of the Financial Times to see what the Times metering system might look like.

Read more: Times online pinchNew York Post

Why the Times Is Wary of an Apple Tablet DealNew York magazine

So Blodget, What Do You Think Of This Paywall Decision By The New York Times? –Business Insider

Previously: NYTimes.com Pay Wall: Media CEOs, Editors And Bloggers Weigh In

Critics Respond To Times‘ Pay Wall Plans

425825719_3bf95d6e86.jpgHow long have we been living under the looming shadow that is the threat of a New York Times‘ pay wall? The answer most likely is since TimesSelect’s fall in 2007, after the paper’s first attempt at getting online readers to pay for content.

Since then, publisher Arthur Sulzberger has made vague promises, culminating in today’s announcement of a plan to launch a metered pay model on NYTimes.com next year. It makes sense: last year saw the Times‘ hemorrhaging money (losing $35 million in the third quarter alone), and speculation that the paper wouldn’t make it to 2010.

Thankfully, Carlos Slim stepped in last year, but it still remains to be seen how the Grey Lady will make it back into the black. While alienating some readers, the metered system of content-charging that Sulzberger is planning may actually be the best compromise between giving away your product for free and going on almost total lock-down mode like the The Wall Street Journal. Under this plan, The New York Times will eventually allow you to read only a certain number of articles per month before asking you to subscribe, much like Variety or The Financial Times (although some have pointed out that the FT‘s model is looking more and more like the Journal‘s).

But even before today’s not completely unexpected announcement, media critics were chomping at the bit to react to the Times‘ possible pay plans. After the jump, a look at what some of them are saying.

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Times Announces Pay Model

nyt logo.jpgAfter months of hemming and hawing The New York Times today finally announced plans for a pay model for its Web site, NYTimes.com.

The model will be a metered plan, as predicted by New York magazine’s Gabriel Sherman over the weekend. Although announced today, the plan won’t go into effect until next year, the New York Times Co. said.

The metered plan will allow users to access a certain number of articles for free before being prompted to pay for additional access, much like The Financial Times‘ current model. Subscribers to the print edition will continue to have free access.

Said publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr.:

“Our new business model is designed to provide additional support for The New York Times‘ extraordinary, professional journalism. Our audiences are very loyal and we believe that our readers will pay for our award-winning digital content and services.”

Full release after the jump

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