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Posts Tagged ‘Gabriel Snyder’

The Atlantic Wire Relaunches

The Atlantic has relaunched The Atlantic Wire today, and it’s got FishbowlNY’s stamp of approval. It’s a clean, bold look, along with categories – Politics, Business, Entertainment, Technology, National, Global – that are constantly updated throughout the day.

Always a place to catch the latest news, the new tagline – “What Matters Now” – stresses that, and the site is more social than before. A reader forum called “Open Wire” lets people discuss the big stories of the day.

Bob Cohn, Editorial Director for The Atlantic Digital team, says the redesign should keep people coming back. “With this months-in-the-works relaunch, we’ll provide an analytical and energetic take on the day’s most important stories. If you’ve been away from your desk for a couple of hours, The Atlantic Wire will tell you everything you need to know about what matters now.”

The site’s new Editor, Gabriel Snyder, must be excited about the spread. Nothing like getting a new, exciting job, and a newly furnished home to go with it. FishbowlNY suggests putting up a Bo Jackson poster in the basement.

The Atlantic Continues Its Online Surge

Yesterday The Atlantic added Gabriel Snyder to run The Atlantic Wire, a move that garnered a lot of praise, and today the good news for the magazine continues: TheAtlantic.com just set new traffic records.

In January the site got a little over five million unique visitors, beating the previous high of 4.77 million set in November of 2010. Additionally, TheAtlantic.com recieved over 25 million page views last month, which marked its second highest total ever.

Keep up the good work fellas. And ladies, of course.

Gabriel Snyder To Run The Atlantic Wire

Gabriel Snyder has been put in charge of The Atlantic Wire, the magazine’s digital component and news aggregation site.  In his new role, Snyder will compile real time news stories and help lay out the day’s headlines for the site. While The Atlantic and theatlantic.com are located in DC, Snyder will work out of Manhattan’s Madison Avenue and is expected to add 15 new hires to work under him.  Snyder explained the benefit of a New York home base.

For the same reason that a lot of places based in New York want a DC bureau, because they want people steeped in the culture of DC, I think this will bring [to DC] people who are more attuned to what’s going on in New York.

Snyder, a former contributor to Variety and W, has resided in New York since 2008 when he served as editor-in-chief of Gawker – a stint that lasted until his untimely dismissal last February.  He then found work at Newsweek where he ran the magazine’s website, however — due to the magazine’s sale to Sidney Harman in August — he only lasted five months in that role.

Leno’s New Promo | O’Reilly Defends Obama | New Media Guidelines | Gawker’s Cold Embrace | Ad Money Returns | The Bieber Experience

The Atlantic: You know shit is about to get real when Bill O’Reilly starts chastising the CPAC for being too mean to Obama.

PRNewser: Social media campaigns and viral endorsements are getting into some gray areas, ethics-wise. That’s why The Word of Mouth Marketing Association has created these helpful Guidelines For Social Media Disclosure.

New York Observer: Former Gawker Managing Editor Gabriel Snyder can take some cold comfort in knowing them former Wonkette Ana Marie Cox does not miss the Nick Denton experience.

Business Insider: Advertisers are going to pay media companies money up front again! Maybe! According to some guy from CBS!

WebNewser: That Justin Bieber kid is blowing up the Internet. If only NBC had managed to get an exclusive endorsement deal with him, and then only show delayed, “best of” footage.

Changes At The Gawker Masthead

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This week has seen some major changes over at Nick Denton‘s premiere site, Gawker.com. First off: Managing Editor Gabriel Snyder is out after 18 months at the job. In a memo to the staff, Snyder sniffed that he’d be “canned” after leaving the West Coast and writing for The Observer to come work for Denton. Snyder’s replacement will be Remy Stern, the founder of Cityfile.com, which Denton has also acquired. Interesting choice, since Cityfile and Gawker would have at one point seemed to overlap in their respective goals, but as Gawker has widened itself from a New York-centric blog to a more global outreach, Cityfile’s acquisition could represent Denton’s desire to hang on to the old Gawker stake in Manhattan drama. Denton’s official reason for buying up Cityfile was, as he told The Wall Street Journal, “to compete more effectively with reference sites. We and they are in a battle for position in Google search results.”

Meanwhile Weekends Editor Foster Kamer will be leaving his post to take a new position writing with Roy Edroso at The Village Voice‘s Runnin’ Scared blog starting March 1st. Kamer will also be leaving his (week)day job of associate editor at BlackBook. Foster announced his departure on Twitter, claiming it had nothing to do with Snyder being fired and we believe him…we’ve been hearing rumors of The Voice not-so-subtly courting the 25-year old wunderkind for weeks now.

Read More: Gawker Finds Itself in the Spotlight — Wall Street Journal

Shafrir, Lawson To Return To Gawker

ggg.jpgAs revealed by TheAwl.com yesterday, and confirmed by Gawker editor-in-chief Gabriel Snyder via Twitter, it looks like Doree Shafrir will be returning to Nick Denton‘s empire in the New Year.

TV writer Richard Lawson will be back, too, Snyder tweeted. He left Gawker earlier this year to work for TV.com.

Shafrir left Gawker in 2007 to join The New York Observer, but was among those let go from the paper in June.

Could these decisions to return to the blog have anything to do with Gawker’s recent decision to offer its writers full-time employment and benefits?

Doree Returns (To Gawker) –TheAwl

Previously: Gawker Offers Writers Full-Time Employment

More On Gawker Media’s Full-Time Status

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Monday morning Nick Denton announced that for the first time ever, Gawker Media writers would have the opportunity to become full-time employees instead of freelancers. Ostensibly good news in this wintery publishing climate, where benefits like health insurance (and even unemployment) are a thing of the past. Sheila McClear, a former Gawker editor who successfully went to court to get unemployment from Gawker told Fishbowl “I congratulate them for going legit.” Sheila is speaking of course, about the common practice for blogs (and most other media these days) to use use freelancers and permalancers in editorial roles so as not to have to dole out benefits or pay the 15% tax for full-time employees.

Many are speculating why Denton finally made the switch: certainly it doesn’t help him financially to pay writers as full-time employees, but it does make an appealing draw to Gawker for heavy-hitting journalists who may not have been willing to work under the previous conditions. Also speculated is that having full-time employees filed under 1099 status is technically illegal, and Denton may have finally gotten in some hot water with the IRS over unpaid taxes. We reached out to Gawker Media and asked them exactly what the terms and conditions of for the new W2 employees are.

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Why “Self-Destructive” LA Times Writer Is Better Suited For Gawker

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Richard Rushfield (center) Photo via FishbowlLA

Richard Rushfield is one of the few West Coasters that are still kept on Gawker‘s payroll. Hell, even Gabriel Snyder had to move back to New York to take the job as managing editor of the online publication. And if that doesn’t make him an outlier enough, Rushfield actually quit The Los Angeles Times (and no, that’s not code for “got fired by Sam Zell” or “took a buyout package”) to take on the role of a full-time blogger. Now he has a book out called Don’t Follow Me, I’m Lost, about what some would call was his counter-intuitive switch from mainstream to digital media.

Our colleagues over at FishbowlLA had a chance to sit down with Rushfield and pin him down on why he left an editor’s job to work at a blog. From their interview, we’ve hypothesized three theories on what makes Rushfield so well suited for the blogosphere.

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One Last Thought On Robert Novak|Newsday Rejects Ad Chastising Parent Co.|Time Inc. Buys Detroit Home|More Reaction To Reader’s Digest Ch. 11 News|Is Anyone Profiting From Gawker’s Threesome Video?

FishbowlDC: One final thought about Robert Novak‘s death today: “There’s no question if you walked out of here and I dropped dead, my obit would probably have [the Plame affair] in the lede.”

New York Times: Cablevision-owned Newsday has rejected an ad by the Tennis Channel chastising the cable provider for not carrying the network.

Detroit Free Press: Time Inc. has purchased a house in Detroit’s West Village that will serve as the media company’s home base as it covers the Michigan city’s struggles to survive the recession.

Paid Content: More reactions to the news that Reader’s Digest Association will likely file for Chapter 11.

Mediaite: The NSFW Eric Dane-Rebecca Gayheart threesome video is racking up big page views for Gawker. But since Nick Denton reinstated page view bonuses at the Web media company, is anyone profiting from the onslaught of clicks? Unfortunately, the popular post’s writer, Gabriel Snyder, is Gawker’s managing editor, so he’s not eligible for the page view bonus, although he will get a bonus for overall increased traffic to the site.

WaPo Writer’s Gawker Experience Raises Questions Of Fair Use

wapo.pngWe feel a bit guilty blogging about this right now, fearing that it will just add fuel to the fire raging over blogs (like this one) that draw information and quotes from stories in news sources like The Washington Post. But thanks to an article in the Post this weekend, the wound is open and raw, so we have to at least let you know what’s been going on.

Yesterday, Post writer Ian Shapira wrote about his experience when Gawker picked up an article he wrote for the paper early last month about a business coach who explains millennials to baby boomers. At first, Shapira was excited by Gawker’s take on his article. “I confess to feeling a bit triumphant…I was flattered,” he wrote.

Then, an email from his editor changed his mind: “But when I told my editor, he wrote back: They stole your story. Where’s your outrage, man?”

Shapira goes on to discuss the amount of work that went into his 1,500-word story that, although not “Pulitzer material” still required hours of travel, interviews, note-taking, transcribing and writing. You know, all the work that goes into any piece of journalism that is not merely a rehashing of someone else’s story. Was it fair of Gawker to rip the story from the pages of the Post and steal Shapira’s thunder? Right or wrong, it’s become common practice on news blogs.

And so, the debate continues.

Updated with Gawker’s reply. Read on.

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