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Posts Tagged ‘Gretchen Morgenson’

NY Times Staffers on What Makes a Good Editor

NYtimes buildingWhat makes a good editor? It’s a simple question that can be answered in a variety of ways. It’s completely subjective, of course, but it’s always interesting to hear what people think. The New York Times, as part of its Times Premier package, asked some of its staffers for their thoughts, and below are some highlights.

David Carr:

A good editor is the enemy of clichés and tropes, but not the overburdened writer who occasionally resorts to them.

Frank Bruni:

A great editor makes you feel safe and supported enough to take chances, but pipes up when you’re taking a truly stupid one.

Gretchen Morgenson:

She or he stands behind the reporter throughout any firestorm that ensues. A spine of steel is imperative.

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Samantha Bee Pays a Visit to the New York Times

Why haven’t other media outlets picked up on the incredible October 22 Bloomberg Businessweek story about some shady, profitable Wall Street maneuvers involving NYC equity firm Blackstone and Spanish gambling outfit Codere? That’s what Jon Stewart and Samantha Bee wanted to know last night on The Daily Show.

And so, Michael Moore/Roger and Me-style, Bee marched over first to the New York Times, where she spoke with reporter Gretchen Morgenson. Together, they engaged in a hilarious ten-second test. Ultimately though, the story fell victim to being “just another day on Wall Street.”

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Did The New York Times Hack Into a Goldman Sachs’ Email Account?

That’s a pretty serious accusation. But Felix Salmon questions the New York Timesstory about the court case against Goldman’s Fabrice Tourre (written by Louise Story and Gretchen Morgenson) for its dubious sourcing.

This is how they got the information: The story was sourced because a New York woman found emails in a laptop discarded in the garbage. Email messages for Tourre continued to stream in, but the woman ignored them until she heard Tourre’s name in the news for the SEC case. Then she gave the data to the Times.

That was the (heavily lawyered) explanation provided. But — even if that is the full truth — is it ethical? Even legal? Writes Salmon:

I understand that the computer was found in a garbage area, and that there’s a long tradition of investigative reporters using information found in the trash. But if Tourre left a key to his apartment in the trash, that wouldn’t give reporters the right to use that key to enter his apartment and snoop around. The laptop was essentially a key to Tourre’s email account — which held highly confidential correspondence between Tourre and his lawyers. An email account, these days, is arguably more private than an apartment, and breaking into a password-protected email account is clearly wrong.

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The 2011 Front Page Awards

FishbowlNY was fortunate enough to be invited as one of Marie Claire magazine’s guests to this year’s Front Page Awards, presented by The Newswomen’s Club of New York, honoring female journalists across a variety of media. The title’s editor at large, Abigail Pesta, was among the evening’s honorees for her piece “An American Tragedy,” which provided a harrowing, in-depth glimpse into honor killings in the U.S.

This year’s dinner was held at the Down Town Club in the Financial District and hosted by Toni Reinhold, president of the Newswomen’s Club and a reporter for Reuters.

Among the bold names at the event was anchor Dan Rather, who attended in support of his colleagues at “Dan Rather Reports,” several of whom won awards last night.

For a full list of the evening’s winners, click through.

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NYT Snags Three Loeb Business Journalism Awards; WSJ, “60 Minutes” Each Get Two

loeb.pngLast night, UCLA’s Anderson School of Management presented its 2009 Gerald Loeb Awards at the New York Athletic Club.

The New York Times was the big winner of the night, with business and financial editor Lawrence Ingrassia receiving the Lawrence Minard Editor Award and the paper and its magazine winning three of the 12 competition categories including the Large Newspaper and Magazine categories and the Best Writing award, which went to Gretchen Morgenson. (Rick Rothacker of The Charlotte Observer also won in the Best Writing category.)

The Wall Street Journal and CBS News’ “60 Minutes” both took home two awards each, and now defunct business magazine Portfolio earned one win in the Feature Writing category for Michael Lewis‘ story “The End.”

A full list of the winners after the jump

Earlier: Loeb Award Finalists Announced; Times, Economist Editors Get Career Achievement Awards

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Columbia Panel Examines Business Press Post-Crisis: “They Followed Conventional Wisdom”

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Last night’s panel (from left to right): Ackman, Starkman, Madrick and Morgenson

Last night, we headed up town to Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism for a panel discussing the future of business journalism.

The panel, which was called “Now What? Business Journalism After the Meltdown,” featured New York Times assistant business and financial editor Gretchen Morgenson, investor Bill Ackman, Jeff Madrick, editor of Challenge Magazine, and Dean Starkman, managing editor of The Audit, The Columbia Journalism Review‘s online critique of financial journalism. Starkman also wrote the CJR cover story critiquing the business press before and after the credit crisis and housing meltdown.

Moderator Bill Grueskin, the dean of academic affairs at Columbia J-School, opened the discussion by asking the panel how they thought the business press had fared in its coverage of the recent economic crisis and what lessons they had learned.

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