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Posts Tagged ‘Harper’s’

Cover Battle: Harper’s or Field & Stream

Welcome back to FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This time around we’re pitting Harper’s versus Field & Stream. Harper’s cover always has a similar look, but we liked this picture of people in suits trying their hand at art. Silly suit wearers! You can only understand art if you wear plaid shirts and enjoy artisanal hushpuppies.

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Harper’s Adds Business Column

Harper’s is adding a business column to its pages. “The Anti-Economist” — penned by Jeff Madrick — is the first business commentary column in the magazine’s history. Madrick is a former economics columnist for The New York Times and an author of several books.

“These days, reporting on and demystifying economic news is one of the most important responsibilities journalists have to their readers,” said Harper’s editor-in-chief, Ellen Rosenbush, in a statement to The New York Observer.

Madrick’s first piece appears in Harper’s October issue.

Journalists Question Veracity of Harper‘s Award-Winning Guantánamo Story

Was Scott Horton‘s “The Guantanamo ‘Suicides’” article, surprise winner of the National Magazine Award for Best Reporting, just another empty conspiracy theory?

The premise of the article was that three detainees who reportedly hanged themselves in Guantanamo had actually been killed during a torture session, and President Obama’s administration at minimum failed to fully investigate this because of what a public relations nightmare it would have been. But Alex Koppelman at Adweek argues that the theory doesn’t hold up.

Koppelman says that the story was shopped around to many investigative journalists, including The New Yorker’s Seymour Hersh and NBC News’ chief Pentagon correspondent Jim Miklaszewski. Several devoted months to investigating the story, but ultimately set it aside after deeming it not credible.  “Only after the big guys passed was the story shopped to Horton,” writes Koppelman. “He won for reporting, but in fact the story fell right into his lap, factual flaws and all.”

What made other journalists pass on the story? For one, Horton’s main sources “were perimeter guards, distant from the prisoners.” When they compared their accounts with “official reports of the suicide… it didn’t match up.”  Moreover, Horton’s story left out a few key details, including the fact that one of the independent autopsies of the prisoners “ended with the conclusion that hanging was, in fact, the most likely cause of death.” And another questionable point is the fact that the story’s source, who reportedly saw the detainees carted off in a white van, had “no way of knowing whether the men he saw were the ones who died later that night.”

The Harper‘s story has met with controversy from the beginning, though the National Magazine Awards stands by its choice.

Another Times Buyout: Magazine Editor Paul Tough

tough.jpgWe learned from a guild memo to New York Times staffers yesterday that 74 editorial staffers have taken the buyout offers provided by the company.

And now, The New York Observer reports that New York Times Magazine editor Paul Tough is among those who said goodbye to the Times yesterday. (Gawker has even more names.)

Tough joined the paper eight years ago, and was previously an editor at Harper’s and a reporter and producer for the public radio show “This American Life.” Like other Times buyout-takers, Tough is an author. He recently published Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America.

Times Magazine Editor Paul Tough Takes BuyoutNew York Observer

Previously: Times Staffers Prepare For Not So Merry Christmas

(Photo via Tough’s Web site)

Harper’s No Content Promise

harpers content.jpg
Check out this house ad in the October issue of Harper’s Magazine.

The ad promises that you’ll never find “content” in the pages of Harper’s.

“Everybody gives you ‘content.’ But you’ll never find that in Harper’s Magazine” the ad boasts. “Instead you’ll get literature. Investigative reporting. Criticism. Photojournalism. Provocative adventures. Daring commentary. And truth-telling as only Harper’s Magazine can tell it.”

What do you think of this new advertising platform? Are you sick of the word “content” as well?

Slate Founder Michael Kinsley To Lead New Digital Launch For Atlantic

Atlantic Consumer Media, which publishes The Atlantic, has brought on Slate founder Michael Kinsley as a media columnist and the editor of an upcoming digital property that will launch early next year.

“As both an editor and a columnist, Michael has long been at the vanguard of publishing’s digital transformation,” said Atlantic Consumer Media President Justin B. Smith. “We are thrilled to welcome him and his considerable talents to the Atlantic Media family.”

A well-known media figure, Kinsley has been an editor at The New Republic and Harper’s and edited the opinion pages at The Los Angeles Times. He has also previously written regular columns for The Washington Post and Time magazine.

Atlantic Media didn’t provide any more detail about the upcoming digital project, but we’ll let you know if we find out any more details. The New York Times points out that Atlantic Media is also currently building Atlantic Wire, “a real-time sampling of opinion and commentary.”

Shouldn’t More People be Reading Harper’s?

2008-10.jpgJon Friedman wants to know why Harper’s isn’t more widely read (notwithstanding Moe Tkacik). Is it because, as Friedman notes, “its covers have all the pizzazz of a form letter from the Internal Revenue Service.” Certainly an apt observation, though Drudge isn’t especially pretty to look at either and it seems to do okay. We think it’s worth pointing out that unlike, say, The New Yorker, Harper’s firewalls most of its content behind a subscription service, and even though we prefer to read long-form pieces in print online access has a way of putting you in the conversation. Not to mention, the Harper’s Index seems to us to be a blog just waiting to happen!

Of course, truth be told, we happen to subscribe to both the New Yorker and Harper’s and we rarely pick the latter up (though it does happen to be the publisher of two of our favorite magazine articles ever). So what gives other than the fact the Internet has killed our attention span?

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