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Posts Tagged ‘Hearst:’

An Inside Look At The Inside of Hearst

Cathie Black, former Chairman of Hearst Corporation, took on her new job as Chancellor of the city’s schools today. To commemorate that, Cooper Smith at Business Insider got an exclusive look inside the Hearst Corporation building, the place Black used to call her home away from home.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to work at Hearst, head on over and take the photographic tour. But be warned, it’s not all “exclusive” items. There’s definitely good stuff, like pictures of magazine layouts and a tour of the Good Housekeeping Institute. But then there’s also pictures of people waiting for elevators (shocking!) and people eating in a break room (maybe what they were eating was worth documenting?).

Oh, and there’s also a picture of Joanna Coles, Editor-in-Chief of Marie Claire, with a look on her face that says “What are you doing here you idiot?” so everyone can get a feel for what being an intern at Hearst is like. Check out the picture of Coles after the jump.

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It’s Official, Hearst And Lagardére Are Discussing A Deal

As 2010 drew to a close, rumors of French-based media conglomerate Lagardére selling off international divisions including Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S. (HFMUS) to Hearst began to heat up.  Today those rumors have been substantiated as Adweek is reporting that the two sides confirmed that they are in fact discussing a deal that would involve Lagardére selling their overseas press and magazine business to Hearst.  Among the major titles that would move from HFMUS to Hearst are Elle, Women’s Day, Car and Driver, and Road & Track.

The exclusive negotiations between Lagardére and Hearst will run through Jan. 30.  Other suitors that are looking to enter the Lagardére sweepstakes are Germany’s Bauer Media Group and the Meredith Corp.

UPDATE: According to WWD, Lagardére is pushing to retain editorial control over Elle even if Hearst purchases the magazine.

Meredith Corporation Joins Hunt For Hachette Titles

Are you one of the many people in the city who will be hosting a New Year’s Eve party tomorrow night? Well imagine your party is going great. You’re showing off your Justin Bieber t-shirt collection and everyone is really jealous. Then, right before midnight, Dan, the guy you didn’t invite because he always ruins everything, shows up. He then proceeds to well, ruin everything, by getting wasted and vomiting in the fruit punch. The party, something you carefully planned for what seems like forever, goes from being a perfect night to a terrible one. And all because Dan showed up late and screwed everything up.

If you’re Hearst, Meredith is Dan. Keith Kelly says that Meredith Corporation, owner of such titles as Better Homes & Gardens, Fitness, and Family Circle, has now entered into the fight to gain Elle and other magazines from Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S. (HFMUS). Just last week Kelly reported a rumor that Hearst was in the lead, but now, with the supposed mid-January deadline fast approaching, Meredith appears to be interested in working out a deal. Kelly notes that Hearst could still win out, because Meredith is publicly held, so any deal will have to be approved by shareholders.

Only time will tell if Meredith’s bid to be a Dan at Hearst’s (so far) perfect party happens, so stay tuned.

Hearst Rumored to Have Lead on Lagardére Group Selloff

The singer of the great (yes, great) band Survivor once eloquently crooned, “Don’t lose your grip on the dreams of the past, you must fight just to keep them alive.” The line from “Eye of the Tiger” will always be used when discussing Rocky, but should Hearst finally win its bid to acquire titles from Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S (HFMUS), perhaps the execs will make use of the song for a celebration. The fight has been going on for about a year now, but according to Keith Kelly of The New York Post, it could finally be over.

Sources are telling Kelly that the deal looks to be finalized in January. As before, the main hurdle, aside from the complicated international partnerships that will need to be sorted out, is that HFMUS’s parent, Lagardére Group, wants to keep control of its biggest brand, Elle.

Hearst continues to reveal little information on the subject, as Paul Luthringer, Spokesperson for the company, told Kelly, “We are always talking to other companies about opportunities, but we don’t comment on speculation as a matter of policy.”

Stick and move Hearst, stick and move.

Hearst Launches New Issue of TeenProm

Just the mere mention of prom is sure to make parents of teenagers everywhere break out in a nervous sweat, but we’ve got a job to do dammit. The 2011 issue of TeenProm is available today and on sale until April 26th. The magazine, which bills itself as the ultimate resource for all things prom, features actress Lucy Hale of the ABC Family show “Pretty Little Liars,” on the cover. Inside there are features from more stars, like Taylor Swift and Emma Watson.

If you’re a parent of a teenager who is prom-ready, FishbowlNY wishes you good luck. Just remember to install the GPS tracking system on their car before they leave for the night.

Redbook Announces Changes

Mary Morgan, Vice President, Publisher and Chief Revenue Officer at Redbook, has named Caroline Casey as Account Director, Beauty and Consumer Products. Casey will be managing several accounts at her new position, including Avon and Revlon.

Additionally, Redbook has promoted Katie Bohan to Senior Beauty and Consumer Products Director.

Morgan said of the news:

We are thrilled to welcome Caroline to the Redbook team and to congratulate Katie on this exciting new chapter in her career. With such seasoned sales professionals, Redbook will continue to deploy the most talented and strategic team in the business.

Magazines Tangle With The Web

If you’ve recently opened a current issue of your favorite magazine you may have noticed that publishers have taken off the gloves in an effort to prove that print is still viable.  NYT.com’s Jeremy W. Peters reports that magazines have adopted a more aggressive approach in their defense of the print medium with an ad campaign that attacks the merits of the Internet.  In a two-page layout headlined by the statement “This is not the Internet.  Feel free to curl up and settle in,” the pro-print ad shows a woman laying on a hammock on a beach and emphasizes the simple nature of magazines compared to distraction-heavy digital content.

Although many of the magazines carrying the ad have digital counterparts, the ad’s chief creator and president of marketing for Hearst Magazines Michael A. Clinton believes that people must remember that print still carries its weight in the industry:

Magazines didn’t have a consumer problem; they had an advertising problem.  We have to be delivering our content in different ways, but in a continually digitized world, the interesting thing is the passion people still have for the print product.

Although the anti-Internet element surfaced only recently, the overall campaign began in March.  The ads are designed by Y&R New York and have appeared in Hearst, Time Inc., Condé Nast, Meredith, and Wenner Media titles.

Embattled San Francisco Chronicle Workers Speak Out on Facebook

As the union for the San Francisco Chronicle braces for another round of negotiations with management, workers have taken to Facebook to express their frustrations and call for public support. Says one post:‎

‘Like’ this group to let Hearst know you stand behind San Francisco Chronicle workers. Last year, when Hearst publicly threatened to close the paper, Guild members rushed in to help. We sacrificed. We agreed to givebacks that cut our pay, vacation, benefits and job security on the promise that the company would do the same. They didn’t. Like Wall Street, Hearst took its bailout and sheltered its executives.

That deserves a “Like,” eh?

Hat tip Romenesko

Food Network Magazine Brings The Heat To Hearst

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Despite the shuttering of O at Home and the company layoffs in 2008, Hearst may be one of the few publishers (along with Rodale and Meredith) that came up as a winner for 2009. And by “winner” we mean “did less terribly than everyone else.” Yesterday Keith Kelly reported that the company’s Food Network Magazine — which plans to print 10 issues this year — may be “one of the fastest starting magazines in publishing history.” That doesn’t mean the magazine hasn’t had its share of problems: there has been a constant revolving door at the title despite only having 5 issues in total, with managing editor Tara Cox (who was poached from Every Day at Rachel Ray) took the same job at Men’s Journal after test-editor Jennifer Dunn ditched out after the first trial issue in 2008.

A source quoted in the piece also admits that several mid-level editors have given notice, designer Sarah Goldschadt may be heading overseas to be replaced by Shira Gordon of Self. That’s a lot of revolving doors for a magazine whose total paid circulation in 2009 was 1,196,835 for four issues.

Read More: Food Network cooks up a hit, despite turnover – New York Post

Previously: Hearst Consolidating O at Home Into O: The Oprah Magazine, Hearst the Latest to Layoff Staffers Company-Wide

Time Inc. Reuses Recipes But Cites Sources…Is It Plagiarism?

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Last week we reported how the trend of “reverse-publishing” was catching on at Meredith and Hearst, where the publishing companies were taking online recipes and putting them into “blogazine” format in print. Apparently, when Time Inc. tries something similar, its considered self-plagiarism, instead of just “crowdsourcing.”

Consider the recent New York Times article on Time’s Health, which re-used some of the recipes from the publisher’s other magazine, Real Simple. The same recipes were used, along with the original photography, although nutritional info was added. Health editor Ellen Kunes credited Real Simple as Health’s source, and said that the articles weren’t free, since they had to be retested and slightly altered to fit Health‘s standards. If the original source — again, managed by the same publisher — is cited, is this different than the content partnerships we see online, like those between Business Insider and Gawker?

Read More: For New and Healthy Recipes, a Magazine Turns to Leftovers — New York Times

Previously: “Reverse Publishing” Gains Traction at Meredith, Hearst

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